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   New York Magazine publishes powerful Hurricane Sandy cover, captures the moment

04 Nov 2012 04:44 PM   |   25494 clicks   |   Yahoo
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Haliburton Cummings     
in before the lock...

i like pictures

04 Nov 2012 04:46 PM
ladyfortuna     
I hadn't seen that one. It is an interesting image, and shows (in my opinion) the vulnerability of our infrastructure especially in older cities.

04 Nov 2012 04:50 PM
henryhill     
yea, powerful

04 Nov 2012 04:50 PM
ArgusRun     
images.nymag.comView Full Size

04 Nov 2012 04:51 PM
boom     
Well done!

04 Nov 2012 04:51 PM
mark12A     
I'm looking forward to the powerful New Yorker Hurricane Sandy cartoon

04 Nov 2012 04:52 PM
skinink    [TotalFark]  

Would like to mail this cover to every Republican who's a Global Warming denier.


mit.zenfs.comView Full Size


04 Nov 2012 04:54 PM
downtownkid     
Hey, I was in the upper right corner of that big dark spot. If you look closely, you can't see my house from here.

04 Nov 2012 04:55 PM
puppetmaster745     
Holy HDR, Batman

04 Nov 2012 04:55 PM
snocone    [TotalFark]  
Time will tell who is stupid.
In the mean time, it is obvious who is behaving stupidly.

04 Nov 2012 04:55 PM
Ima4nic8or     
I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.

04 Nov 2012 04:56 PM
EZ1923     
If I lived in NYC, I would frame that.

04 Nov 2012 04:56 PM
snocone    [TotalFark]  
There are many reasons for not stacking humans 20 million deep a few square miles.
This one has been brought to you by Doc Obvious.

04 Nov 2012 04:58 PM
downtownkid     

Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.


You really don't understand how living in a city works, do you?

Anyway, your perception of what happened seems to be pretty distorted. Most people were adequately prepared and did just fine. North of 39th Street it was business as usual. The only areas with real problems are the ones that were completely devastated, and you have similar issues in any disaster area.

04 Nov 2012 04:59 PM
Haliburton Cummings     

Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.


wow...

you just don't get it do ya....

well, the pacific plate seems to be warmin its diaper for a big load so you'll see soon enough...

enjoy!

04 Nov 2012 05:00 PM
Fark Rye For Many Whores     

skinink: Would like to mail this cover to every Republican who's a Global Warming denier.
[mit.zenfs.com image 567x756]


Is this related? I'm not a Denier but I don't see how one storm proves a pattern.

04 Nov 2012 05:05 PM
Spanky_McFarksalot     
apparently the east coast and new york and the first place in the world to ever experience a power outage due to a storm.

04 Nov 2012 05:05 PM
skinink    [TotalFark]  
Ima4nic8or must be trolling, that's too much derp in one statement. And how many people only have cell phones and not home phones? I don't have a home line, only a cell phone. Luckily I kept all my previous phones because I had them all charging in case the power went out. The only concern is that the cell towers would go out of action as well, then I would be cut off.

It was lucky that in Boston the hurricane seemed to be mostly a non event. I didn't even lose power.

04 Nov 2012 05:06 PM
cmb53208     

Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.


Plugging in the cell phones? Those phones are like the black plastic wall unit land lines people depended on in Charleston, SC after Hugo hit in 1989. Moreover, folks recieved vital news via news websites and Facebook on those phones.

The fuel became an issue after public transit was halted and New Yorkers had to drive, assuming rhey had a car. Cabs needed fuel as did generators.

04 Nov 2012 05:07 PM
Gosling     

Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.


The range of essential everyday survival skills changes over time. Hundreds of thousands of years ago you had to get your own food, so everyone had to know how to do that. These days, you have to know how to operate devices that let you know what's going on halfway across the globe in an instant. Someone else is making a living getting the food you previously had to hunt or farm yourself so the rest of the population doesn't have to. So that skill atrophies. Spearing a bison is a much less relevant skill to the modern American than knowing not to publish their credit card number on Facebook.

04 Nov 2012 05:07 PM
Fissile     

snocone: There are many reasons for not stacking humans 20 million deep a few square miles.
This one has been brought to you by Doc Obvious.


==================

There are even more reasons for not living in suburbs, places that have neither the benefits/charms of the country nor the city, but combine the downside of both.

I suppose it makes more sense to live in a places that require massive inputs of fossil fuels and the wars, environmental destruction, and cultural/societal obliteration that goes along with it.

04 Nov 2012 05:08 PM
Haliburton Cummings     

Fark Rye For Many Whores: skinink: Would like to mail this cover to every Republican who's a Global Warming denier.
[mit.zenfs.com image 567x756]

Is this related? I'm not a Denier but I don't see how one storm proves a pattern.


i49.tinypic.comView Full Size


what a Denier might look like...

04 Nov 2012 05:09 PM
Ima4nic8or     
"And how many people only have cell phones and not home phones?"

Only the crazy folks. Cell phones are an unreliable, trendy luxury item. They are not really that good as a primary means of communication.

04 Nov 2012 05:09 PM
ladyfortuna     

Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.


I'm going to answer you seriously even if you're trolling, which I'm not saying you are, just... here goes.

Mind you I live in a rural area, grew up camping, and generally have at least two weeks worth of food on hand plus equipment/gear to get the hell out if needed just because of the way I was raised. However if you've ever seen how the average apartment is sized, you'd understand how especially anywhere with more than a couple of floors of tenants, no, they're not prepared. People who live in tiny apartments don't have the space to stock up for emergencies, and since NYC hardly ever has this kind of thing happen (at least since it became a major metropolis), there's not been much reason for that to change. People who live out in the more suburban areas are still mostly people who work in the city, so they've got a lot of the same mentality. NYC has always been touted (to me) as a place where you can get anything you want, 24/7. A huge chunk of the places that provided that however, I believe, were in the flooded/no power areas.

Also NYC has a HUGE footprint, despite all those skyscrapers. Public transit was virtually shut down at first, and a lot of it still is due to fuel/power issues. You can walk, sure, but if you have to walk what you normally take the subway for and it's 5-6x as far as you are used to or more, well... I say this having visited Manhatten once for a few hours; that place scared the crap out of me since I am from a small city you can drive across in 5 min on the highway.

As to cell phones, most people don't have landlines anymore. I know I don't, however I also don't have a lot of people I'd need to contact anyway so I don't usually worry about it. However, unless you turn your phone off, you will need to charge it within a couple of days at best, sooner if not. Mine (smartphone) lasts about a day because I am lazy and haven't figured out how to root it to stop the programs that drain the battery.

If you really want a good idea of the sheer scope of the storm's aftermath, go watch the videos on weather.com and nbc - entire neighborhoods are just GONE closer to the shore. Again, this isn't a regular thing in the upper-mid-atlantic region, so people weren't nearly as prepared as they would be in Florida. I've never in my life owned a generator, have lived in Western NY pretty much my whole life.

I had started a class like two days after Katrina hit and was upset with the government for not responding quickly enough, and we were talking about it in class, when my professor made a very good point. In the military (he knew I was in the Army before), when you take a group of ~250 people out to the field, it takes about 3 days to get everything ready to go, and this is in a basic training company with regular practice at the exercise. Imagine doing this for thousands or MILLIONS of people with just a few days warning on the storm's landfall. After he made that point, I've at least stopped being mad about the gulf coast response times, and I'm applying that logic to this one too.

So just some food for thought, hopefully it helps people put things in perspective, and if you don't agree, that's ok. This is just how I see it. I am a little on the other side of the fence too; I don't think it's very intelligent to live on the ocean and expect that this could never happen. Hence why I live 400+ miles inland.

04 Nov 2012 05:10 PM
bighairyguy    [TotalFark]  
What's a magazine?

04 Nov 2012 05:11 PM
starsrift     

Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.


NYC is the 13th most densely populated city in the world; seven of the preceding twelve are in India. People pay thousands of dollars to live in closets. It's a completely different lifestyle compared to the rest of the USA.

04 Nov 2012 05:11 PM
Haliburton Cummings     

Ima4nic8or: "And how many people only have cell phones and not home phones?"

Only the crazy folks. Cell phones are an unreliable, trendy luxury item. They are not really that good as a primary means of communication.


only partially idiotic:

the one advantage is that a landline will still work if the power goes out.

04 Nov 2012 05:11 PM
JonBuck     

Ima4nic8or: "And how many people only have cell phones and not home phones?"

Only the crazy folks. Cell phones are an unreliable, trendy luxury item. They are not really that good as a primary means of communication.

Maybe

that was true in the mid-late 90s, but not now. Welcome to the 21st century.

04 Nov 2012 05:15 PM
Fark Rye For Many Whores     

Ima4nic8or: mean to be a dick


Everyone I know is still going to work through this shiat.

04 Nov 2012 05:16 PM
Mister Peejay     

cmb53208: Moreover, folks recieved vital news via news websites and Facebook on those phones.


Call me callous, but what news is so vitally important that they couldn't figure out by trying to turn the lights on?

04 Nov 2012 05:17 PM
ladyfortuna     

starsrift: Ima4nic8or:

NYC is the 13th most densely populated city in the world; seven of the preceding twelve are in India. People pay thousands of dollars to live in closets. It's a completely different lifestyle compared to the rest of the USA.


And then when they've made enough money they move up to my neck of the woods to retire :D

Seriously, my neighbor and his wife are both from the Bronx, lived here like 20 years and they still have the accent.

04 Nov 2012 05:17 PM
Joe Peanut     
www.washingtonpost.comView Full Size

04 Nov 2012 05:17 PM
scottapeshot     
Staten Island gets screwed AGAIN.

04 Nov 2012 05:18 PM
tomWright     
chicagoboyz.netView Full Size

04 Nov 2012 05:18 PM
mark12A     
Is this related? I'm not a Denier but I don't see how one storm proves a pattern.

Just Bloomberg trollin', getting some buzz....

/been a below average hurricane season
//just sayin'

04 Nov 2012 05:19 PM
JonBuck     

Mister Peejay: cmb53208: Moreover, folks recieved vital news via news websites and Facebook on those phones.

Call me callous, but what news is so vitally important that they couldn't figure out by trying to turn the lights on?


Oh, I don't know, this maybe?

04 Nov 2012 05:19 PM
Bendal     

Haliburton Cummings: Ima4nic8or: "And how many people only have cell phones and not home phones?"

Only the crazy folks. Cell phones are an unreliable, trendy luxury item. They are not really that good as a primary means of communication.

only partially idiotic:

the one advantage is that a landline will still work if the power goes out.


Only until the switching station batteries fail. When Hurricane Fran hit Raleigh several years ago, we lost power during the storm but the landline kept working. Then a few hours later that line went dead too; the batteries at the switching station died and nothing worked (the cellphone towers were down as well).

04 Nov 2012 05:19 PM
Mister Peejay     

bighairyguy: What's a magazine?


That's the thing that people on the Internet keep mistakenly calling a clip.

04 Nov 2012 05:20 PM
Haliburton Cummings     

JonBuck: Mister Peejay: cmb53208: Moreover, folks recieved vital news via news websites and Facebook on those phones.

Call me callous, but what news is so vitally important that they couldn't figure out by trying to turn the lights on?

Oh, I don't know, this maybe?


PJ Harvey works a call centre?

04 Nov 2012 05:22 PM
Mister Peejay     

JonBuck: Mister Peejay: cmb53208: Moreover, folks recieved vital news via news websites and Facebook on those phones.

Call me callous, but what news is so vitally important that they couldn't figure out by trying to turn the lights on?

Oh, I don't know, this maybe?


That's a heartwarming example of how social media can be useful in a crisis, but I mean after-the-fact.

04 Nov 2012 05:23 PM
Pete_T_Mann     

Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm.


You needed the storm to tell you that? Though I admit, I wondered if maybe the storm would show some side of New York that was repressed, some toughness there not normally perceptible--but I thought it more likely there would be lots of whining and crying over things like no cell phone and not having power for a couple days. Things went pretty much as I expected. My relatives from Louisiana are very amused by it all.

04 Nov 2012 05:27 PM
tomWright     

Mister Peejay: bighairyguy: What's a magazine?

That's the thing that people on the Internet keep mistakenly calling a clip.


golfclap.jpg

04 Nov 2012 05:27 PM
downtownkid     

Mister Peejay: JonBuck: Mister Peejay: cmb53208: Moreover, folks recieved vital news via news websites and Facebook on those phones.

Call me callous, but what news is so vitally important that they couldn't figure out by trying to turn the lights on?

Oh, I don't know, this maybe?

That's a heartwarming example of how social media can be useful in a crisis, but I mean after-the-fact.


I just lived through this. Went four days with no heat, electric, hot water, internet or cell service. In the end not a big deal as I was well prepared. The internet and cell service WERE important, and we hiked out of the neighborhood til we picked up a signal. It was important to find out how wide the power outage was, when we could expect a return of services, etc. and react accordingly. They also helped us check on loved ones and let them know that we were okay.

04 Nov 2012 05:28 PM
rewind2846     
FTA: "Bloomberg Businessweek took a slightly different tack with their Nov. 5 cover. The coverline: "IT'S GLOBAL WARMING, STUPID."

"Our cover story this week may generate controversy," Bloomberg Businessweek Editor-in-Chief Josh Tyrangiel wrote on Twitter, "but only among the stupid."

*bookmarks Bloomberg Businessweek website*

04 Nov 2012 05:28 PM
fozziewazzi     

tomWright: [chicagoboyz.net image 548x700]


img268.imageshack.usView Full Size

04 Nov 2012 05:29 PM
Haliburton Cummings     

Bendal: Haliburton Cummings: Ima4nic8or: "And how many people only have cell phones and not home phones?"

Only the crazy folks. Cell phones are an unreliable, trendy luxury item. They are not really that good as a primary means of communication.

only partially idiotic:

the one advantage is that a landline will still work if the power goes out.

Only until the switching station batteries fail. When Hurricane Fran hit Raleigh several years ago, we lost power during the storm but the landline kept working. Then a few hours later that line went dead too; the batteries at the switching station died and nothing worked (the cellphone towers were down as well).


worked at a telco...thats rare. (usually) they aren't battery powered unless your location is under 150,000 subscribers.
if the switch went down, it was a line interruption, not batteries...

just sayin...telco threadjack over

04 Nov 2012 05:29 PM
Haliburton Cummings     

Mister Peejay: bighairyguy: What's a magazine?

That's the thing that people on the Internet keep mistakenly calling a clip.


ahh the gun nuts...always good for a laugh

04 Nov 2012 05:31 PM
ArgusRun     
If you are in another part of the country, I can understand some of the ire. When something happens to the city, it becomes major news simply because that's where the national news media is headquartered. My suburb of NYC has a similar issue. So many media personalities (Colbert etc) and reporters live here, that every local issue has the potential to go national. Our minor condo dispute was on Fox. A high school soccer club membership controversy was in the Times.

That said, remember that the tri-state area has 22 million people. That's the equivalent of the bottom 20 states or so.

04 Nov 2012 05:31 PM
Fissile     

Pete_T_Mann: Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm.

You needed the storm to tell you that? Though I admit, I wondered if maybe the storm would show some side of New York that was repressed, some toughness there not normally perceptible--but I thought it more likely there would be lots of whining and crying over things like no cell phone and not having power for a couple days. Things went pretty much as I expected.  My relatives from Louisiana are very amused by it all.


=========

Your relatives in Louisiana are probably amused by flush toilets, spouses who are not first cousins, and road signs that are not shot full of holes.

04 Nov 2012 05:31 PM
mongbiohazard     

Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.



Couple things...

Most people are acting like grownups. Don't let a few reports of bad behavior here and there trick you in to thinking that's how most people are acting. Just remember back to Katrina... in the immediate aftermath of Katrina there were horror stories flooding the airwaves - almost none of which were even true. Remember how the Superdome was being described as some kind of Mad Max, post-apocalyptic rape-and-murder-thon? Turns out it was bullshiat. And the few true reports of bad eggs get exaggerated by the myopia of the news cycle... The populations of New York and New Jersey are like 16 million people - so keep that in mind when you hear a report of ONE guy getting arrested after pulling a gun out at a gas station. 15,999,999 other people did NOT pull out guns at the gas station.

For another thing this is NYC and NJ close to winter, not sunny California. Most people are living in NYC are in high rises and without electricity you are going to be awful cold this time of year. For another, people in these urban areas don't have a whole lot of square footage in their apartments to store weeks of food and supplies. So while *I* also have enough emergency supplies for my family to go a few weeks without power I'm not going to be too smug about a couple in a 400 sq ft studio not being able to prepare to that same level. On top of that, they live in one of the shiniest examples of capitalism ever... in the NYC metro area you can buy pretty much anything, so even in unusual circumstances you really don't have too many problems getting resources in the NYC/NJ area. It takes a full on disaster to disrupt the ability of resources to flow around that area... which brings me to...

I also think you're underestimating the scale of this disaster. It's massive. It was a full-on multi-state disaster. I thought at first comparisons to Katrina were ridiculous, but as time goes on it becomes apparent that the scale of damage at least is not really all that out of the question for comparison. It is going to be a long time before things are back to normal - though I do think this is going to be a VERY resilient area to have gotten hit. But this is one of the worst disasters in the city's history. The subways have never taken a hit like this before, there are many tunnels, both vehicular and mass transit, which are still flooded. Entire neighborhoods were just erased, and days after the storm hit they still had 20,000 people trapped by floodwaters in Hoboken. And the storm did widespread damage all over the entire STATE of NJ. I've got relatives up there in both north and south NJ, and they all only got electricity back yesterday. 1/4 of the cellphone towers across TEN STATES are damaged and offline - and many of he others operating on emergency power.

Which also brings me to your final issue, landline phones. Many people in these urban areas don't have landline phones. In America in general 40% of households no longer have a landline, and even when they do many of those are VOIP phones through their cable providers which are not working when the cable isn't. Costs of living are high, and a landline phone is redundant and useless for the majority of people the vast majority of the time. My relatives, however, were able to communicate with my family via text messages, so we were able to send them needed supplies right away. Communication can be VERY important in situations like this. And also, a lot of the copper telecom infrastructure was also destroyed or damaged.

All in all, I think you're totally underestimating the impact of this storm... the scope of the damage was much bigger and more serious than you're giving it credit for. This was a massive disaster, not just some wind and rain.

04 Nov 2012 05:35 PM
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