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   Doctor operates on the wrong side of one patient's brain, the wrong part of another patient's spine and leaves the operating room during surgery. Doctor "Those cases have changed how I provided care and made me a better physician"

05 Nov 2012 03:36 AM   |   8919 clicks   |   Denver Channel
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Arthur Jumbles     
Oops?

04 Nov 2012 11:01 PM
Ambivalence    [TotalFark]  
I thought shiat like "medical school" and "surgical residency" were supposed to make you a better physician. By the time you're hacking into a patient's brian you're supposed to already be a pretty damn good surgeon, not some iidiot farktard.

04 Nov 2012 11:19 PM
Asa Phelps    [TotalFark]  
if at first you don't succeed - try, try again.

04 Nov 2012 11:36 PM
NowhereMon     
So, tort reform then?

04 Nov 2012 11:56 PM
Benevolent Misanthrope    [TotalFark]  
WTF? If one of my employees farked around like that on the job, they'd be in Progressive Discipline faster than you could say "Jack Robinson". Not just the mistakes, which are bad enough, but the actual not doing her job at all - not reading the report from radiology and therefore not diagnosing the patient at all, leaving the OR during surgery...

Colorado should never have allowed her to settle with no discipline. These were not just odd mishaps, they demonstrate that she just doesn't do her job when she doesn't feel like it. She should be removed from any chance of her farking around causing anyone else harm.

04 Nov 2012 11:57 PM
BronyMedic     

Ambivalence: I thought shiat like "medical school" and "surgical residency" were supposed to make you a better physician. By the time you're hacking into a patient's brian you're supposed to already be a pretty damn good surgeon, not some iidiot farktard.


Mistakes happen because people are people. The fact that people think Doctors are immune to making them demonstrates the kind of flawed thinking that we attribute to educated people. And the fact of the matter is that they frequently have more to do with the practices of a system than the decisions of an individual person.

04 Nov 2012 11:58 PM
BronyMedic     

Benevolent Misanthrope: WTF? If one of my employees farked around like that on the job, they'd be in Progressive Discipline faster than you could say "Jack Robinson". Not just the mistakes, which are bad enough, but the actual not doing her job at all - not reading the report from radiology and therefore not diagnosing the patient at all, leaving the OR during surgery...

Colorado should never have allowed her to settle with no discipline. These were not just odd mishaps, they demonstrate that she just doesn't do her job when she doesn't feel like it. She should be removed from any chance of her farking around causing anyone else harm.


This, too.

04 Nov 2012 11:59 PM
MaudlinMutantMollusk    [TotalFark]  
Know what they call the guy who graduates dead last in his med school class?

/doctor

05 Nov 2012 12:00 AM
Ambivalence    [TotalFark]  

BronyMedic: Ambivalence: I thought shiat like "medical school" and "surgical residency" were supposed to make you a better physician. By the time you're hacking into a patient's brian you're supposed to already be a pretty damn good surgeon, not some iidiot farktard.

Mistakes happen because people are people. The fact that people think Doctors are immune to making them demonstrates the kind of flawed thinking that we attribute to educated people. And the fact of the matter is that they frequently have more to do with the practices of a system than the decisions of an individual person.


sure mistakes happen, but proper training in "best practices" is supposed to reduce their frequency by a great deal. A doctor having a "series" of mistakes is not just an example of normal human imperfection, it demonstrates a fundamental lack of skill or adherence to proper proceedure.

05 Nov 2012 12:08 AM
AbbeySomeone     
Nothing to see here people, they have no f*cking clue about what is ailing you but will give you whatever systemic altering drugs to keep you coming back.

05 Nov 2012 12:09 AM
BronyMedic     

AbbeySomeone: Nothing to see here people, they have no f*cking clue about what is ailing you but will give you whatever systemic altering drugs to keep you coming back.


How do you go from saying things that are so intelligent and thought-out, to saying complete derp like this?

05 Nov 2012 12:28 AM
SpaceyCat    [TotalFark]  

AbbeySomeone: Nothing to see here people, they have no f*cking clue about what is ailing you but will give you whatever systemic altering drugs to keep you coming back.


While medicine is a science, it is not a precise science like math. What works for one person will do nothing for another person or make another person sicker. While doctors are SUPPOSED to have more information and a better clue than you, that does not mean you can completely rely on them for the correct answer. If you don't think something is correct for you, push back and say no or ask for further information. Or get another opinion.

The idiot in the article needs to her have license revoked and banned from medicine completely. One mistake is ok. Four in that short of a period of time? Fark no. That shows that you have a distinct disability in what you do. Personally, I think she should be held financially accountable - those that she farked up, she needs to pay for their care for the rest of their lives. Operating on the wrong side of the body is so incredibly BASIC.

\there's a reason why they call it medical practice

05 Nov 2012 12:38 AM
dramboxf    [TotalFark]  
Anyone wanna bet what the leading cause of needless death is in this country?

Obesity? Nah.
Cardiac issues? Nope.
Alcoholism/Drug Abuse? No siree.
Cancer? Not even close.
DUI/Car Accidents? PUH-leese.

Over 900,000 Americans die every year due to physician error.

05 Nov 2012 12:47 AM
BronyMedic     

dramboxf: Anyone wanna bet what the leading cause of needless death is in this country?

Obesity? Nah.
Cardiac issues? Nope.
Alcoholism/Drug Abuse? No siree.
Cancer? Not even close.
DUI/Car Accidents? PUH-leese.

Over 900,000 Americans die every year due to physician error.


[Citation Needed]

The actual number is between 48,000 to 98,000 people die each year due to medical error or malpractice. This includes missed or wrong diagnosises, and medication errors.

05 Nov 2012 12:55 AM
namatad    [TotalFark]  

BronyMedic: Mistakes happen because people are people. The fact that people think Doctors are immune to making them demonstrates the kind of flawed thinking that we attribute to educated people. And the fact of the matter is that they frequently have more to do with the practices of a system than the decisions of an individual person.


but these are not mistakes. Once is a mistake, a couple times a year, sure fine.
But this? This is a clear pattern of dangerous incompetence, negligence.
And the Medical Boards are culpable.
WHY did they not want to discipline her?
WHAT is the point of a Medical Board if they dont actually protect society from people like this?
Rubber stamping Board Examines I guess. Woot!! We are so lucky that they are there protecting doctors like this.

/shudder

05 Nov 2012 12:59 AM
namatad    [TotalFark]  

BronyMedic: The actual number is between 48,000 to 98,000 people die each year due to medical error or malpractice. This includes missed or wrong diagnosises, and medication errors.


Which leads to a number of different causes with a number of different solutions to improve the numbers.
Misdiagnosis? Better double checking and better diagnostic processes, aimed at finding misdiagnosis rather than cutting expenses.
Medication errors? Shudder. So many causes. Why are our pharmacists counting 30 pills from a big container into a little container? Prefilled 30bottles could probably go a long way to cutting some of those errors down. Dont get me started on dr's handwriting

but in the end, eternal vigilance on the part of the patient is probably the only solution.

/The checks which were done in pre-op for my last knee surgery amused me. Multiple people asking which knee, and signing the leg. Dr, nurse, anesthesiologist, oh yes, and ME.
/csb

05 Nov 2012 01:07 AM
dramboxf    [TotalFark]  

BronyMedic: [Citation Needed]

The actual number is between 48,000 to 98,000 people die each year due to medical error or malpractice. This includes missed or wrong diagnosises, and medication errors.


Here's the problem with that number. And, as a medic, you should be aware of this.

The entire system of how a hospital death is reported is broken; Physicians insist that they, and only they, because of their massive education, are qualified enough to decide why[1] a specific patient died.

M&M, have you ever heard of it?

There exists in this country a parade of lies, if you will. A resident makes a mistake and a patient dies and after review the doctors decide that the ACTUAL cause of death was something else, something systemic or incurable. SO MANY physician mistakes are covered up because it's all "part of the process of making good physicians."

I recognize the fact that doctors-in-training are going to make mistakes. I recognize that this is part of the process of creating doctors. But they need to be more honest about it, more open that when we train physicians (and yes, even paramedics) they are going to make mistakes and patients will die.

I have a problem with the insular community that holds out a hand and says "ONLY WE are qualified to judge what is an honest, innocent mistake and what is farked up."

[1] There's a difference between the medical cause of death and what has led to it. Just as in law, if a victim is shot to death, the medical cause of death is "cardiac arrest due to hypovolumia" and the legal cause of death is "homicide by gunshot."

I also saw your [citation needed] and will have to get back to you; I got that # from a ER physician friend of mind and he's half a world away (AUS) and not responding to an 'emergency' email.

05 Nov 2012 01:21 AM
Solid Muldoon     
And they will make me the best inmate ever!

05 Nov 2012 03:38 AM
ongbok    [TotalFark]  
A doctor operating on the wrong side of a person's brain is not only a failure on the doctor, but a failure on the entire surgical staff also.

05 Nov 2012 03:44 AM
elffster     
A friend of mine is a doctor, not just a doc but a surgeon. She is pretty careful when doing her job, and yes, they will ask a patient more than once which body part has the boo-boo and needs fixing.

But she has pointed out often that even though a person can finish medical school, that does not mean they are smart.

05 Nov 2012 03:49 AM
Gyrfalcon    [TotalFark]  
1. Mistakes happen, for sure, and doctors are no more immune to them than anybody else.
2. That said, this KIND of mistake shouldn't be happening at this LEVEL of medicine. Operating on the wrong side of someone's brain isn't in the same league as misdiagnosing the flu for pneumonia; or even amputating the left leg when it was supposed to be the right leg.
3. Misdiagnoses happen because doctors are under a lot of pressure; and because some diseases present as other diseases. And also because, let's face it, sometimes mistakes will happen and not be discovered in time to save the patient, which was how John Ritter died--nobody recognized a dissecting aortic aneurism as not being a simple heart attack in time to save his life.
4.However, there are also crappy doctors, like there are crappy teachers, crappy accountants and crappy mechanics. There are people who don't belong in their chosen field and most of the time they get discovered in time to prevent greater harm, in medicine or in auto mechanics. Sometimes they don't.

But to think there's some kind of locked-hands double dealing on the part of doctors to keep evil and/or incompetent physicians practicing even when they know people are dying is ridiculous. Doctors suffer because of these quacks and bush-league Mengeles, as much as attorneys suffer from wannabe Dream Team members; just because one or two bad doctors slip through the cracks doesn't mean all doctors are conspiring to keep scalpels in their wicked brethrens' hands as long as possible. Medicine is an art, and all survivors are JUST SURE that their family member would have survived if only Evil Doctor hadn't been there. That doesn't make it true. Second-guessing does nobody any good at all.

05 Nov 2012 03:49 AM
WizardofToast     
www.youdopia.comView Full Size

05 Nov 2012 03:50 AM
Hoopy Frood     
Pathologist: Have you seen this before?

Doug: Seen it? Upstairs they call that a "Doug"!

05 Nov 2012 03:51 AM
Gosling     
Hi, everybody!

05 Nov 2012 03:53 AM
Gunther     

BronyMedic: Ambivalence: I thought shiat like "medical school" and "surgical residency" were supposed to make you a better physician. By the time you're hacking into a patient's brian you're supposed to already be a pretty damn good surgeon, not some iidiot farktard.

Mistakes happen because people are people. The fact that people think Doctors are immune to making them demonstrates the kind of flawed thinking that we attribute to educated people. And the fact of the matter is that they frequently have more to do with the practices of a system than the decisions of an individual person.


Sure, doctors make mistakes. Few of them make so many mistakes they have to repeatedly surrender their medical licence and move from state to state just so they can keep practicing medicine.

05 Nov 2012 04:01 AM
powhound     
RateMyNeurosurgeon.com?

[RATE] 0/5 stars: wrong farking side of BRAIN!!!!!

05 Nov 2012 04:04 AM
DO NOT WANT Poster Girl    [TotalFark]  

Gyrfalcon: 1. Mistakes happen, for sure, and doctors are no more immune to them than anybody else.
2. That said, this KIND of mistake shouldn't be happening at this LEVEL of medicine. Operating on the wrong side of someone's brain isn't in the same league as misdiagnosing the flu for pneumonia; or even amputating the left leg when it was supposed to be the right leg.
3. Misdiagnoses happen because doctors are under a lot of pressure; and because some diseases present as other diseases. And also because, let's face it, sometimes mistakes will happen and not be discovered in time to save the patient, which was how John Ritter died--nobody recognized a dissecting aortic aneurism as not being a simple heart attack in time to save his life.
4.However, there are also crappy doctors, like there are crappy teachers, crappy accountants and crappy mechanics. There are people who don't belong in their chosen field and most of the time they get discovered in time to prevent greater harm, in medicine or in auto mechanics. Sometimes they don't.

But to think there's some kind of locked-hands double dealing on the part of doctors to keep evil and/or incompetent physicians practicing even when they know people are dying is ridiculous. Doctors suffer because of these quacks and bush-league Mengeles, as much as attorneys suffer from wannabe Dream Team members; just because one or two bad doctors slip through the cracks doesn't mean all doctors are conspiring to keep scalpels in their wicked brethrens' hands as long as possible. Medicine is an art, and all survivors are JUST SURE that their family member would have survived if only Evil Doctor hadn't been there. That doesn't make it true. Second-guessing does nobody any good at all.


I work with doctors as a faculty member in a medical school. and have been on the patient side of things.

When my father died due to obvious hospital and doctor negligence, I could not find a local doctor out by his residence to review or testify on our behalf, due to protectionism attitudes.

The medical social world is very insular among doctors and you'd have to live in it to see the extent of it, and that's all I'm saying on that.

05 Nov 2012 04:12 AM
hammettman     
If I ever need brain surgury, and I can still hold a sharpie, I'm going to make sure I denote on my body the difference between my right and left side.

i90.photobucket.comView Full Size

05 Nov 2012 04:13 AM
orbister     

BronyMedic: The fact that people think Doctors are immune to making them demonstrates the kind of flawed thinking that we attribute to educated people. And the fact of the matter is that they frequently have more to do with the practices of a system than the decisions of an individual person.


The trouble does not arise when "people" think doctors never make mistakes. It comes when doctors think that they themselves never make mistakes. Some errors are never, ever excusable: leaving swabs in, operating on the wrong place, operating on the wrong patient and so on. And yet they happen, and generally they happen because the doctor concerned was so sure s/he was right that s/he ignored the warnings of colleagues or bullied them into not warning in the first place.

05 Nov 2012 04:15 AM
moothemagiccow    [TotalFark]  
"The board's primary obligation is to protect the public health and safety and welfare in Colorado," he said. "That's our mandate."

In other news, Colorado has closed all its prisons in favor of exile to Missouri. A senior official was quoted as saying "Two states away, keep the criminals at bay."

05 Nov 2012 04:15 AM
TheVeryDeadIanMartin     
I once read a story about a doctor in Quito, Ecuador, who accidentally cut a main artery during a routine operation. Instead of trying to stop the bleeding, he and his assistant simply bolted, hopped on a plane, and left the country. Meanwhile the woman bled out and died on the table. Her husband became suspicious when no one could update him on her condition and finally barged into the operating room four hours later to find his wife dead on the table and the machines still on.

05 Nov 2012 04:23 AM
The Iron duke     
FtA: 'she was selected as chief neurosurgery resident at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, after obtaining her undergraduate degree at Duke'....
So Duke..

05 Nov 2012 04:39 AM
Feral_and_Preposterous     
Okay, FTA: The hospital knew it would be a controversial hire, according to a draft media plan the hospital came up with to explain her hiring. CALL7 Investigators obtained the media plan, which explains what arguments would and wouldn't work to explain her hiring.

The plan notes Colorado never revoked Crute's license and that New York and Illinois regulators, after thoroughly investigating Crute, issued her licenses to practice medicine. It notes her distinguished academic background and that the four medical errors in Colorado were only .0006 percent of the patients she treated.


I suck at the maths, but does this mean she treated 666,666 people? I think I've forgotten how to do that calculation. Would one of you math whizzes care to provide the correct answer?

05 Nov 2012 05:22 AM
gwowen     

Feral_and_Preposterous: Okay, FTA: The hospital knew it would be a controversial hire, according to a draft media plan the hospital came up with to explain her hiring. CALL7 Investigators obtained the media plan, which explains what arguments would and wouldn't work to explain her hiring.

The plan notes Colorado never revoked Crute's license and that New York and Illinois regulators, after thoroughly investigating Crute, issued her licenses to practice medicine. It notes her distinguished academic background and that the four medical errors in Colorado were only .0006 percent of the patients she treated.


I suck at the maths, but does this mean she treated 666,666 people? I think I've forgotten how to do that calculation. Would one of you math whizzes care to provide the correct answer?


Yes, that's what it means - or more than 150 a day for ten years (no vacations). Which is, of course, completely insane.

05 Nov 2012 05:29 AM
thamike    [TotalFark]  
welovesoaps.comView Full Size


"I'm not going to lie to you. There's some problems with your father's aynal caynal."

05 Nov 2012 05:30 AM
Feral_and_Preposterous     

gwowen: Feral_and_Preposterous: Okay, FTA: The hospital knew it would be a controversial hire, according to a draft media plan the hospital came up with to explain her hiring. CALL7 Investigators obtained the media plan, which explains what arguments would and wouldn't work to explain her hiring.

The plan notes Colorado never revoked Crute's license and that New York and Illinois regulators, after thoroughly investigating Crute, issued her licenses to practice medicine. It notes her distinguished academic background and that the four medical errors in Colorado were only .0006 percent of the patients she treated.


I suck at the maths, but does this mean she treated 666,666 people? I think I've forgotten how to do that calculation. Would one of you math whizzes care to provide the correct answer?

Yes, that's what it means - or more than 150 a day for ten years (no vacations). Which is, of course, completely insane.


Good. I was hoping I wasn't losing it. And I agree, that claim seems ludicrous.

05 Nov 2012 05:41 AM
Day_Old_Dutchie     

ongbok: A doctor operating on the wrong side of a person's brain is not only a failure on the doctor, but a failure on the entire surgical staff also.


No...no..your OTHER left..

05 Nov 2012 05:45 AM
No Such Agency    [TotalFark]  

namatad: /The checks which were done in pre-op for my last knee surgery amused me. Multiple people asking which knee, and signing the leg. Dr, nurse, anesthesiologist, oh yes, and ME.


And that's how mistakes are not made. Key points here are "physical documentation" and "multiple people". I think assholes like this doc get in trouble because they are not willing to work as a team or admit potential weakness/fallibility.

05 Nov 2012 05:47 AM
Summoner101     

Feral_and_Preposterous: gwowen: Feral_and_Preposterous: Okay, FTA: The hospital knew it would be a controversial hire, according to a draft media plan the hospital came up with to explain her hiring. CALL7 Investigators obtained the media plan, which explains what arguments would and wouldn't work to explain her hiring.

The plan notes Colorado never revoked Crute's license and that New York and Illinois regulators, after thoroughly investigating Crute, issued her licenses to practice medicine. It notes her distinguished academic background and that the four medical errors in Colorado were only .0006 percent of the patients she treated.


I suck at the maths, but does this mean she treated 666,666 people? I think I've forgotten how to do that calculation. Would one of you math whizzes care to provide the correct answer?

Yes, that's what it means - or more than 150 a day for ten years (no vacations). Which is, of course, completely insane.

Good. I was hoping I wasn't losing it. And I agree, that claim seems ludicrous.


Doctors are not known for their math skills.

05 Nov 2012 06:22 AM
Heist     

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Know what they call the guy who graduates dead last in his med school class?

/doctor


Yes, but that doctor usually goes on to be a PCP in rural Arkansas, not a neurosurgeon.

05 Nov 2012 06:27 AM
orbister     

No Such Agency: And that's how mistakes are not made. Key points here are "physical documentation" and "multiple people". I think assholes like this doc get in trouble because they are not willing to work as a team or admit potential weakness/fallibility.


I have heard of one surgeon (I am sure he's not the only one) who starts each theatre session by telling the other staff "Your job is to stop me killing someone". He admits fallibility and actively encourages more junior staff to tell him when he's screwing up, or about to. Unfortunately that view is far from universal in the medical profession, far too many of whose members are outraged at the idea that they could ever make a mistake, or that the rules should apply to them.

Q. What's the difference between God and a neurosurgeon?
A. God doesn't think He's a neurosurgeon.

05 Nov 2012 06:35 AM
oryx     
Some people learn from their mistakes. She didn't.

05 Nov 2012 06:41 AM
SkunkWerks     

Gyrfalcon: But to think there's some kind of locked-hands double dealing on the part of doctors to keep evil and/or incompetent physicians practicing even when they know people are dying is ridiculous.


Looking at the facts in this story, I'm going to have to say it's not "ridiculous". When a review board lets "a couple" mistakes slide, that you might attribute to human "understanding".

When a review board lets seventeen mistakes slide by, then basically reinvents math to claim it was only a six-thousandths of a percent margin for error, you can't even call it "gross negligence" anymore

At that point you have little other choice but to conclude it was deliberate.


Does that mean that I believe absolutely every medical professional is- by their very nature- part of a vast underground railroad of surgical hacks and medical malignancies?

No. But to suggest that this review board hired that woman on either in complete ignorance of what a liability she was, or in honest good faith that she'd be doing better from now on far more closely fits the definition of "ridiculous".

They hired her deliberately- and in full knowledge of what a risk she posed to their clientele. What other explanation can there be for this other than willfully choosing one's own colleagues over public safety?

05 Nov 2012 06:49 AM
MayoSlather     

ongbok: A doctor operating on the wrong side of a person's brain is not only a failure on the doctor, but a failure on the entire surgical staff also.


This. My last knee operation both the doctor and nurses marked and verified they had the correct knee. While the brain is a different situation it's also so much more vital to be working on the right area; this should have been triple checked before an incision was made.

05 Nov 2012 06:58 AM
ShannonKW     
Nightmare Inducing Story Bro:

Hospital I worked at did cerebral angiograms. This is a way of getting a picture of the layout of the blood vessels in someone's brain. The way they do it is by injecting a radio-opaque dye into those blood vessels and then taking an X-ray. Gives you a bird's nest looking picture of everywhere that the blood is flowing. It's useful for spotting brain circulation problems like strokes, aneurisms, etc.

Naturally, since you're injecting stuff directly into a guy's brain it's a no-shiat, serious procedure with a genuine specialist physician at the helm. So, here's our doc, masterfully threading all the stuff exactly to the right place before his admiring team, totally focused. When he gets everything just so, he calls for the dye.

Instantly, bells and whistles go off, vital signs go every which way, and the patient changes color in moments as they furiously scramble to identify the problem. It wasn't dye. It was floor cleaner, that extra-strength anti-fungal stuff they use to sterilize hospital surfaces. Outcome: total basket case, and they pulled the plug a few days later.

The family were a hell of a lot more understanding than anyone had a right to expect, though they did get an "undisclosed settlement". It was a totally inexcusable error, but I still can't help but wonder how that doctor felt in that moment. I actually feel sorry for that farker. I've felt the panic of error before, realizing I'd misread the schedule and missed a midterm exam, but nothing like that crushing weight of awful realization. It's a wonder the man didn't commit suicide. I'd bet he considered it.

05 Nov 2012 07:01 AM
dstrick44     

BronyMedic
2012-11-04 11:58:26 PM
Ambivalence: I thought shiat like "medical school" and "surgical residency" were supposed to make you a better physician. By the time you're hacking into a patient's brian you're supposed to already be a pretty damn good surgeon, not some iidiot farktard.

Mistakes happen because people are people. The fact that people think Doctors are immune to making them demonstrates the kind of flawed thinking that we attribute to educated people. And the fact of the matter is that they frequently have more to do with the practices of a system than the decisions of an individual person


No.
A mistake like this is akin to your mechanic filling your gas tank with brake fluid.
I know, I know, Dr's are busy and don't have time to think about rights and lefts, so let's just add that duty to the nurse's already looooonnnnng list of responsibilities and have her literally draw a dotted line that says "CUT HERE".
The other side can say in red magic marker,"DO NOT AMPUTATE THIS ARM"

05 Nov 2012 07:02 AM
cajunns     
Not knowing right from left is a more blatant problem than not being medically competant

05 Nov 2012 07:09 AM
KrispyKritter     
why do you think they call it 'practicing medicine', people? practice makes perfect!

meanwhile there is untold amounts of people every year who think doctors are supposed to be farking miracle workers capable of resurrecting their beloved senior citizen parent who has been succumbing to a variety of illnesses after a long hard life and can just make mom or dad tap dance like they are 20 again. sorry, it doesn't work that way.

people get smashed in accidents, riddled with bullets, ruined by disease --- all sorts of BAD things happen to GOOD people. doctors aren't gods in lab coats. they are human beings like you and i. they might be under the weather with a cold, have a hangover, be in the middle of a miserable divorce, suffering through what is happening to the health of their own loved ones -- shiat happens. they are just people.

the medical profession is incredibly difficult. some people need to grow up and realize it ain't all fun and games out there. i'll admit i'm biased. it was good doctors who cared and worked hard that gave me my life back.

05 Nov 2012 07:18 AM
weirdneighbour     
Heist
MaudlinMutantMollusk: Know what they call the guy who graduates dead last in his med school class?

/doctor

Yes, but that doctor usually goes on to be a PCP in rural Arkansas, not a neurosurgeon. 


I always thought the answer was 'dentist'

05 Nov 2012 07:20 AM
SkunkWerks     

ShannonKW: It's a wonder the man didn't commit suicide. I'd bet he considered it.


It's often said of surgeons- particularly good ones- that they lack a certain warmth and are often have a terrible bedside manner. "Detachment" I believe is the professional practice of it. The notion that being too attached to your clientele leads you to make judgement calls based upon that attachment, rather than your own expertise.

My father had an orthopedic surgeon take care of him after he nearly paralyzed himself in a bad car accident. Ended up having about 80% of his spine fused, and his x-rays show an installation in there which looks a lot like an erector set. The doctor did good work (most of my father's doctors were dumbstruck that he managed to bounce back as well and as quickly as he did), and I'm sure the price tag was a reflection of his expertise.

But the good doctor wasn't much of a conversationalist.

In follow-up visits, the guy looked like a caged animal. He was ready to climb the walls to escape having to speak to us- even though that is, you know, kinda the point of a follow-up visit.

I don't know if it was professionalism, or maybe if the profession attracts people like him. I'm not passing judgement on the attitude either, really. It's just that I often wonder what's behind the facade, if facade it even is. I suppose what I'm saying is that to assume he felt guilt (at least to any great degree) may be assuming a lot.

Though, if you're right, I'm intrigued.

05 Nov 2012 07:21 AM
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