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   Remember that total bullshiat story about how NJ unions were supposedly turning away out-of-state nonunion utility workers who wanted to fix things up after Sandy? It's bullshiat in Jersey, all right - but not in New York. There's a paper trail

06 Nov 2012 10:39 AM   |   9955 clicks   |   The Daily Caller
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NowhereMon     
Look, just get back to us when you get your story straight...

06 Nov 2012 09:15 AM
RexTalionis    [TotalFark]  
If the first time you reported this story turned out to be completely fabricated, why should I believe you when you report this story again?

06 Nov 2012 09:26 AM
Gulper Eel    [TotalFark]  
So the union backed off. Even they recognized that if there's shaking-down to be done, the state legislature gets to be first in line.

06 Nov 2012 09:35 AM
BalugaJoe    [TotalFark]  
Everyone in Long Island is in the mafia.

06 Nov 2012 10:41 AM
crapo87     
I don't see where they're turning anyone away.

06 Nov 2012 10:42 AM
Lehk     
why should i believe anything from cocksucker carlson's online rag?

06 Nov 2012 10:43 AM
factoryconnection    [TotalFark]  
Well there it is... the IBEW went too far. And then they went back on it, figuring that the shoddy work done by the low-wage guys will have to be redone.

I guess I'll vote "no" on unionization at my electrician shop, and then vote yes later.

06 Nov 2012 10:44 AM
sprawl15    [TotalFark]  
man has a bowtie

bowties cannot tell a lie

06 Nov 2012 10:44 AM
super_grass     
So wait...

Charging shiatloads of money for food and fuel after a disaster is wrong because it's gouging.

But keeping labor prices high thanks to government-legislated monopolies after the same disaster is okay?

Fark union apologists. explain this.

06 Nov 2012 10:51 AM
Gulper Eel    [TotalFark]  

BalugaJoe: Everyone in Long Island is in the mafia.


Not true. There are also Bloods, Crips, Latin Kings, and Martha Stewart when she's in the Hamptons.

06 Nov 2012 10:52 AM
angryjd     
Are the people on this page saying unions don't actually do this? Methinks they have never had any exposure to unions...

06 Nov 2012 10:52 AM
LowbrowDeluxe     
I work in insurance talking with a lot of small time contractors. Don't generally deal with unions, but from the people I've dealt with I bet I can tell you how this happened, and it's not some bullshiat omg unions are evil thing. There's a lot of companies who chase the storms, and since they have the manpower, tools, and experience to deal with disaster relief, they get hired. Unfortunately, there's enough of them nowadays that a lot of the local guys are getting less or none of the recovery work, and it's creating a lot of bad blood. I wouldn't be at all surprised if an organized collection of local workers tried to force their 'share' of the work. It's a disaster, their home and neighborhood is farked, fixing it is within their job description, and the money instead of going to them and helping them get back on their feet is going out of state. I don't know which method is actually better for disaster recovery, I can personally understand local governments and associations giving the contracts to people who specialize in that sort of work, but for instance if you're a tree trimmer, ain't no one getting their hedges manicured right now and there is a whole lot of work clearing limbs and felling dead trees. Sucks to be benched while some out of towner is taking your lunch.

06 Nov 2012 10:52 AM
JohnCarter     
Farking unions...great and needed 100 years ago, now sort of like carriage makers, payphone operators, and film developers. The time may have passed

06 Nov 2012 10:53 AM
cirby     
factoryconnection:
Well there it is... the IBEW went too far. And then they went back on it,

...after they got caught.

06 Nov 2012 10:53 AM
Joe Blowme     
Elections have consequenses. Reap what you sow NY'ers.

06 Nov 2012 10:53 AM
Je5tEr     

factoryconnection: Well there it is... the IBEW went too far. And then they went back on it, figuring that the shoddy work done by the low-wage guys will have to be redone.

I guess I'll vote "no" on unionization at my electrician shop, and then vote yes later.


Yeah its not like crews who get experience with large amounts of hurricane damage EVERY YEAR would have any experience relevant to Long Island's current troubles.

06 Nov 2012 10:54 AM
iheartscotch     
Oh, I'm quite afraid that the unions will look like scumbags when your friends arrive.

/ unions served a point once; when it became more about the union then the individual workers in the union; that is when, to me, they lost any good will they had gained.

06 Nov 2012 10:55 AM
thurstonxhowell     

RexTalionis: If the first time you reported this story turned out to be completely fabricated, why should I believe you when you report this story again?


06 Nov 2012 10:55 AM
Satanic_Hamster     

LowbrowDeluxe: I work in insurance talking with a lot of small time contractors. Don't generally deal with unions, but from the people I've dealt with I bet I can tell you how this happened, and it's not some bullshiat omg unions are evil thing. There's a lot of companies who chase the storms, and since they have the manpower, tools, and experience to deal with disaster relief, they get hired. Unfortunately, there's enough of them nowadays that a lot of the local guys are getting less or none of the recovery work, and it's creating a lot of bad blood. I wouldn't be at all surprised if an organized collection of local workers tried to force their 'share' of the work. It's a disaster, their home and neighborhood is farked, fixing it is within their job description, and the money instead of going to them and helping them get back on their feet is going out of state. I don't know which method is actually better for disaster recovery, I can personally understand local governments and associations giving the contracts to people who specialize in that sort of work, but for instance if you're a tree trimmer, ain't no one getting their hedges manicured right now and there is a whole lot of work clearing limbs and felling dead trees. Sucks to be benched while some out of towner is taking your lunch.


That and you just don't let every single work crew who decides to show up go to work on your electrical equipment... No matter how wide spread a disaster is, there's an upper limit on the number of crews they're going to want to be working at once just from a logistical and management position alone, much less questions over pay rates and qualifications.

06 Nov 2012 10:57 AM
fickenchucker     
I said it in the last thread when it turned out to be misinformation. The real problem for unions is everyone is willing to believe stories like this apparently true and factual one.

Anyone who has had to deal with unions knows how irrational and corrupt they can be. The die has been cast, and ironically enough for that phrase, it was union work that destroyed their formerly glorious reputations.

If unions want to regain their respect and clout they have decades of housecleaning and refocusing to do. Until then they're rarely more than obstructionists lining the pockets of their leadership at the expense of the union brother masses. Just like every other Communist organization.

06 Nov 2012 11:02 AM
BooBoo23    [TotalFark]  

super_grass: But keeping labor prices high thanks to government-legislated monopolies after the same disaster is okay?


Are you insinuating that the linemen out there should take a pay cut to clean up this mess?

06 Nov 2012 11:03 AM
WarszawaScream    [TotalFark]  

BalugaJoe: Everyone in Long Island is in the mafia.


We prefer the term organized activity, thank you.

And I got nothing here. I'm Long Island, I'm union, and I'm just farking disgusted by the idea. I don't know if it's true or not because I'm CSEA and not IBEW, but I can't begin to imagine anyone... yeah I really got nothing.

Anyone turning anybody away needs to walk down my motherfarking block into ground zero of this shiatstorm and watch people throwing out their entire farking lives. See how fast your union dues matter then, dipshiat.

06 Nov 2012 11:03 AM
vpb    [TotalFark]  
So if it doesn't work the first time, just refurbish it again and try again?

06 Nov 2012 11:09 AM
Aarontology     

BooBoo23: super_grass: But keeping labor prices high thanks to government-legislated monopolies after the same disaster is okay?

Are you insinuating that the linemen out there should take a pay cut to clean up this mess?


he's saying he's against people making money because he's a communist.

06 Nov 2012 11:13 AM
vpb    [TotalFark]  

angryjd: Are the people on this page saying unions don't actually do this? Methinks they have never had any exposure to unions...


Or maybe your only idea of unions comes from wing-nut blogs? It's kind of a stupid claim considering that the workers are there temporarily and there is no chance of union workers being laid off due to lack of work. So, it's an implausible and stupid claim.

06 Nov 2012 11:14 AM
Aarontology     
Another thing people should realize is that when out of staters come in to help things like this, they're not doing it as employees. They're doing it as independent contractors and they end up costing way, way more than the regular workers since the out of staters have the power companies over a barrel.

That happened here after Snowmageddon a couple of years ago. There weren't enough guys to fix all the damage quick enough, so a bunch of people came in from out of state and ended up charging more for their wages than the regular employees.

06 Nov 2012 11:15 AM
vpb    [TotalFark]  

Aarontology: BooBoo23: super_grass: But keeping labor prices high thanks to government-legislated monopolies after the same disaster is okay?

Are you insinuating that the linemen out there should take a pay cut to clean up this mess?

he's saying he's against people making money because he's a communist.


Only job creators should have money. People who actually produce or fix things should be grateful they have a job. They don't need money too.

06 Nov 2012 11:15 AM
LowbrowDeluxe     

BooBoo23: super_grass: But keeping labor prices high thanks to government-legislated monopolies after the same disaster is okay?

Are you insinuating that the linemen out there should take a pay cut to clean up this mess?


No, no, he's just saying they should take a pay cut if they want to get the work instead of the storm chaser with an RV full of day laborers who will do it for less. That's how the invisible hand of the free market works. After all, it's just a natural disaster there's no way it's also affecting the local economy and disrupting their regular work.

06 Nov 2012 11:16 AM
Aarontology     

vpb: Only job creators should have money. People who actually produce or fix things should be grateful they have a job. They don't need money too.


He also apparently doesn't understand the difference between "price gouging" and "regular prices"

06 Nov 2012 11:17 AM
BooBoo23    [TotalFark]  

Aarontology: he's saying he's against people making money because he's a communist.


And that's fine. He can drop his rates at the truck stop men's room if he wants to, but I'm not sure that asking the linemen to take a pay cut right now is such a good idea.

06 Nov 2012 11:18 AM
Aarontology     

BooBoo23: And that's fine. He can drop his rates at the truck stop men's room if he wants to, but I'm not sure that asking the linemen to take a pay cut right now is such a good idea.


Yeah, I'm really not sure what the point of that is either.

There's a reason linesman make good money. Because one slip up can kill them, their crew, and cause a lot of property damage. All while, (at least in this case) working ridiculous hours to ensure the power comes back on.

Electricity isn't like plumbing where someone who doesn't really know what they're doing can kind of muddle through. You want people who know exactly what they're doing, and you want them to be well paid to attract top talent

It's like people forget how capitalism works sometimes.

06 Nov 2012 11:21 AM
King Something     

super_grass: So wait...

Charging shiatloads of money for food and fuel after a disaster is wrong because it's gouging.

But keeping labor prices high thanks to government-legislated monopolies after the same disaster is okay?

Fark union apologists. explain this.


Goods vs services.

When paying someone for a particular service, you get what you pay for:
Exhibit A: Over-the phone PC tech support - would you rather deal with the $30/hr union worker who speaks American English or the sub-minimum wage guy from India who tells you to do the needful?
Exhibit B: Night-Ladies - would you rather spend an hour or two with a lady who looks like she understands the concept of personal hygiene but charges $1000 for full service; or the lady who looks like she hasn't bathed in a week, probably has more social diseases than she does teeth, but only charges $10?
Exhibit C: Automotive mechanical work - would you rather get a radiator hose installed at Pep Boys for $50 (with a warranty and guarantee), Bubba's Oil And Tires for $20 (no warranty or guarantee), or Sam's Club for $19 (no warranty or guarantee, except for the guarantee that your money will be used to help Walmart exploit Chinese slave labor)?

Think about which you would choose in the above scenarios and why, and then consider choosing between having power lines reconnected by $30/hr local union workers who'll still be in town after the job's done, or by $9/hr non-union guys from out-of-state who'll go back to their home the minute they finish "fixing" the problem.

/disclaimer: I am neither an over-the-phone PC tech support guy, a night-lady, an automotive mechanic nor a power line technician
//I've never had to go to Pep Boys more than once to fix a problem on any car I've ever had, nor have I ever had a new problem pop up immediately after they fix the old one

06 Nov 2012 11:21 AM
lawboy87     
So, those crews from FL, GA, AL, SC, NC, etc. who go to NJ or NY, - just how much higher a wage do you think they are probably receiving (inclusive of overtime, etc.) than they would receive if they were working in their home states? (My guess is that they will receive a salary at least 25%-50% greater than they would receive doing the same work back in Biloxi, Greensboro or Tallahassee.)

Now, who spent the time, money and effort to negotiate those higher wages? The local NY/NJ unions did. So why is it so outrageous for them to at least seek to recoup some of those costs from what amount to "free rider" outside, non-union types who are all to happy to avail themselves of that much higher wage?

You think those crews are doing this out of the goodness of their hearts? They are doing it because they know they will be cashing in with a much higher paycheck (due primarily to the difference in the prevailing wages between the two regions). Again, I just don't see what is so outrageous about the local unions trying to recover a small fraction of the cost they incurred in securing those higher prevailing wages in the first place.

06 Nov 2012 11:22 AM
cig-mkr     

King Something: super_grass: So wait...

Charging shiatloads of money for food and fuel after a disaster is wrong because it's gouging.

But keeping labor prices high thanks to government-legislated monopolies after the same disaster is okay?

Fark union apologists. explain this.

Goods vs services.

When paying someone for a particular service, you get what you pay for:
Exhibit A: Over-the phone PC tech support - would you rather deal with the $30/hr union worker who speaks American English or the sub-minimum wage guy from India who tells you to do the needful?
Exhibit B: Night-Ladies - would you rather spend an hour or two with a lady who looks like she understands the concept of personal hygiene but charges $1000 for full service; or the lady who looks like she hasn't bathed in a week, probably has more social diseases than she does teeth, but only charges $10?
Exhibit C: Automotive mechanical work - would you rather get a radiator hose installed at Pep Boys for $50 (with a warranty and guarantee), Bubba's Oil And Tires for $20 (no warranty or guarantee), or Sam's Club for $19 (no warranty or guarantee, except for the guarantee that your money will be used to help Walmart exploit Chinese slave labor)?

Think about which you would choose in the above scenarios and why, and then consider choosing between having power lines reconnected by $30/hr local union workers who'll still be in town after the job's done, or by $9/hr non-union guys from out-of-state who'll go back to their home the minute they finish "fixing" the problem.

/disclaimer: I am neither an over-the-phone PC tech support guy, a night-lady, an automotive mechanic nor a power line technician
//I've never had to go to Pep Boys more than once to fix a problem on any car I've ever had, nor have I ever had a new problem pop up immediately after they fix the old one


Paying people more money doesn't result in better quality. I supervised six union electricians and eight union mechanics and let me tell you they weren't equal in skillsets. A few I couldn't trust to fix a ham sandwich. And these guys were all making $34 an hour plus bennies.

06 Nov 2012 11:30 AM
super_grass     

King Something: super_grass: So wait...

Charging shiatloads of money for food and fuel after a disaster is wrong because it's gouging.

But keeping labor prices high thanks to government-legislated monopolies after the same disaster is okay?

Fark union apologists. explain this.

Goods vs services.

When paying someone for a particular service, you get what you pay for:
Exhibit A: Over-the phone PC tech support - would you rather deal with the $30/hr union worker who speaks American English or the sub-minimum wage guy from India who tells you to do the needful?
Exhibit B: Night-Ladies - would you rather spend an hour or two with a lady who looks like she understands the concept of personal hygiene but charges $1000 for full service; or the lady who looks like she hasn't bathed in a week, probably has more social diseases than she does teeth, but only charges $10?
Exhibit C: Automotive mechanical work - would you rather get a radiator hose installed at Pep Boys for $50 (with a warranty and guarantee), Bubba's Oil And Tires for $20 (no warranty or guarantee), or Sam's Club for $19 (no warranty or guarantee, except for the guarantee that your money will be used to help Walmart exploit Chinese slave labor)?

Think about which you would choose in the above scenarios and why, and then consider choosing between having power lines reconnected by $30/hr local union workers who'll still be in town after the job's done, or by $9/hr non-union guys from out-of-state who'll go back to their home the minute they finish "fixing" the problem.

/disclaimer: I am neither an over-the-phone PC tech support guy, a night-lady, an automotive mechanic nor a power line technician
//I've never had to go to Pep Boys more than once to fix a problem on any car I've ever had, nor have I ever had a new problem pop up immediately after they fix the old one


You're assuming that unions are consumer protection organizations. They are not, their purpose is to secure a good wage for their members. Being a union member is not the same as being experienced, licensed, and bonded.

06 Nov 2012 11:35 AM
ManRay     
Protectionism? In my union?

I don't understand why something like this could persist...unions have such an opposite reputation when it comes to putting the job ahead of their own interests.

06 Nov 2012 11:38 AM
SkunkWerks     

NowhereMon: Look, just get back to us when you get your story straight...


That.

06 Nov 2012 11:39 AM
Englebert Slaptyback     

LowbrowDeluxe


I work in insurance talking with a lot of small time contractors. Don't generally deal with unions, but from the people I've dealt with I bet I can tell you how this happened, and it's not some bullshiat omg unions are evil thing. There's a lot of companies who chase the storms, and since they have the manpower, tools, and experience to deal with disaster relief, they get hired. Unfortunately, there's enough of them nowadays that a lot of the local guys are getting less or none of the recovery work, and it's creating a lot of bad blood. I wouldn't be at all surprised if an organized collection of local workers tried to force their 'share' of the work. It's a disaster, their home and neighborhood is farked, fixing it is within their job description, and the money instead of going to them and helping them get back on their feet is going out of state. I don't know which method is actually better for disaster recovery, I can personally understand local governments and associations giving the contracts to people who specialize in that sort of work, but for instance if you're a tree trimmer, ain't no one getting their hedges manicured right now and there is a whole lot of work clearing limbs and felling dead trees. Sucks to be benched while some out of towner is taking your lunch.


True, but (and you alluded to this, so we're agreeing) from a recovery perspective it probably makes more sense to hire the larger firms that have more of everything and can cover more ground than it does to hire a slew of individual local guys just because they're local.

06 Nov 2012 11:39 AM
muck4doo     

Aarontology: Another thing people should realize is that when out of staters come in to help things like this, they're not doing it as employees. They're doing it as independent contractors and they end up costing way, way more than the regular workers since the out of staters have the power companies over a barrel.

That happened here after Snowmageddon a couple of years ago. There weren't enough guys to fix all the damage quick enough, so a bunch of people came in from out of state and ended up charging more for their wages than the regular employees.


You mean the people who have to travel across state lines to the job site, and don't get to eat or sleep at home are getting paid more? That's terrible.

06 Nov 2012 12:06 PM
lizyrd     

super_grass: So wait...

Charging shiatloads of money for food and fuel after a disaster is wrong because it's gouging.

But keeping labor prices high thanks to government-legislated monopolies after the same disaster is okay?

Fark union apologists. explain this.



Okay, so fuel is sold at a prevailing cost, with a deviation of around 4% in a several hundred square mile area. A storm hits and knocks out power to a bunch of gas stations. Only one station still has power. They're still buying tankers at wholesale prevailing cost. But then they jack the price to the consumer up to 20%, above retail price since the people have no where else to go. That's gouging.

The linesmen that come up from Florida are earning prevailing wage while in New York. As in, that's already what the labor in New York costs. They're not increasing the price of labor because of the storm. That's not gouging, in fact it's the exact opposite.

They're not turning anyone away, they're saying that any non-member coming in that benefits from the union's negotiation of wages has to pay dues on wages earned. If a linesmen from Florida is so anti-union that he won't pay 1% to the IBEW for the pay bump, he should just stay home. If the Floridian utilities are so anti-union that they refuse to withhold the 1% as required by contract, they can refuse the big emergency dollars from the local utility.

No one is doing this because they want to "fix the place up." The utilities out West and down South are sending workers because the local utilities in the devastated areas are paying big, big bucks for extra help. The linesmen are coming up because they're making big money on overtime for this.

06 Nov 2012 12:09 PM
Aarontology     

muck4doo: You mean the people who have to travel across state lines to the job site, and don't get to eat or sleep at home are getting paid more? That's terrible.


Seeing as how the original post was that I was responding to was biatching and moaning about how bad it is that the regular guys aren't facing a pay cut, hiring out of staters at a higher cost is counter productive towards the goal of cost reduction.

So yes. From that perspective, it is terrible. Especially considering the hours a lot of the regular guys are working which precludes them from eating or sleeping at home as well.

06 Nov 2012 12:10 PM
Enigmamf    [TotalFark]  

fickenchucker: The die has been cast, and ironically enough for that phrase, it was union work that destroyed their formerly glorious reputations.


When have unions ever been highly regarded by the majority or by conservatives? For decades they were treated practically as communists. Heck, they still are.

06 Nov 2012 12:31 PM
Joe Blowme     

Enigmamf: fickenchucker: The die has been cast, and ironically enough for that phrase, it was union work that destroyed their formerly glorious reputations.

When have unions ever been highly regarded by the majority or by conservatives? For decades they were treated practically as communists. Heck, they still are.


shoe fits and all that

06 Nov 2012 12:35 PM
MindStalker     

super_grass: So wait...

Charging shiatloads of money for food and fuel after a disaster is wrong because it's gouging.

But keeping labor prices high thanks to government-legislated monopolies after the same disaster is okay?

Fark union apologists. explain this.


Letter was sent Monday before the storm actually hit. After storm hit and damage was known they recanted. Its hard to know if this letter was even related to the storm, or if it was a simply a end of the month form letter send every month.

06 Nov 2012 12:41 PM
fickenchucker     

Enigmamf: fickenchucker: The die has been cast, and ironically enough for that phrase, it was union work that destroyed their formerly glorious reputations.

When have unions ever been highly regarded by the majority or by conservatives? For decades they were treated practically as communists. Heck, they still are.



Unions grew from the need to push back against corporate abuses. And for many years post-"The Jungle", there was a decently positive national opinion of unions. But then they won the basics we all enjoy, like a shorter work week, health insurance, etc. and realized their only reason for existence was to obstruct the advancement of technology. It went downhill over the course of my lifetime, to the point no-one really cares about unions anymore.

Unions have themselves to blame for the widely-publicized links to the mafia, featherbedding, and insane protections of bad employees based on seniority, rather than skill level.

06 Nov 2012 12:43 PM
SkunkWerks     

fickenchucker: Enigmamf: fickenchucker: The die has been cast, and ironically enough for that phrase, it was union work that destroyed their formerly glorious reputations.

When have unions ever been highly regarded by the majority or by conservatives? For decades they were treated practically as communists. Heck, they still are.


Unions grew from the need to push back against corporate abuses. And for many years post-"The Jungle", there was a decently positive national opinion of unions. But then they won the basics we all enjoy, like a shorter work week, health insurance, etc. and realized their only reason for existence was to obstruct the advancement of technology. It went downhill over the course of my lifetime, to the point no-one really cares about unions anymore.

Unions have themselves to blame for the widely-publicized links to the mafia, featherbedding, and insane protections of bad employees based on seniority, rather than skill level.


Where you find large degrees of influence, you also find large degrees of abuse.

That's the price of fighting fire with fire, I'm afraid.

06 Nov 2012 12:51 PM
hocho064     

Gulper Eel: BalugaJoe: Everyone in Long Island is in the mafia.

Not true. There are also Bloods, Crips, Latin Kings, and Martha Stewart when she's in the Hamptons.


These groups all adore this guy:

www.movieleatherjacket.comView Full Size

06 Nov 2012 12:53 PM
OscarTamerz     
But in New York, no government official has stepped in to ensure that utility crews from other states won't have to show their union membership cards before going to work

So Governor Cuomo has his lips sucking union cock as always.

www.sunrunhome.comView Full Size


Looks like he's practicing for a little bukkake 2 cock action.

06 Nov 2012 12:53 PM
cefm     
And I can send a letter to Santa Claus demanding a hot-oil massage froma circa 1970 Raquelle Welch, but that doesn't mean it's going to happen.

How exactly would this have been enforced? The out-of state crews sign up with the utility, and the utility gives them orders and pays their invoices - the IBEW is not involved. They're free to take it up with the utility itself, but their letters aren't worth the paper they're printed on.

06 Nov 2012 12:55 PM
SkunkWerks     

cefm: And I can send a letter to Santa Claus demanding a hot-oil massage froma circa 1970 Raquelle Welch, but that doesn't mean it's going to happen.

How exactly would this have been enforced? The out-of state crews sign up with the utility, and the utility gives them orders and pays their invoices - the IBEW is not involved. They're free to take it up with the utility itself, but their letters aren't worth the paper they're printed on.


And it would have worked too!

If not for you meddling kids! And that dog!

06 Nov 2012 12:57 PM
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