(full site)
Fark.com

Try out our new mobile site!


Back To Main
   U.S. housing prices rise the most in the past six years. Even in Washington, the cost to rent the White House for four years is now up to $2 billion

08 Nov 2012 12:51 PM   |   1851 clicks   |   First Coast News
Showing 1-26 of 26 comments
Refresh
The Stealth Hippopotamus    [TotalFark]  
nice

08 Nov 2012 09:22 AM
tallguywithglasseson    [TotalFark]  
I'd think going up .001 percent would be the most in the past six years.

08 Nov 2012 10:26 AM
bdub77    [TotalFark]  
Well according to my nutjob friend the US debt will go from 16T to 50T over the next four years, so it would seem the cost is closer to 34 trillion.

The only solution to these revenue problems was of course to cut taxes even more.

08 Nov 2012 11:06 AM
Rik01    [TotalFark]  
Is it wise to base economic recovery on housing sales? The cost of an average home has been steadily spiraling upwards over the last 40 years, becoming one of the major expenses a consumer will invest in.

The impact on local areas is tremendous, as new land is cleared, new sanitation services installed, new roads built, the natural contours of the land changed, assorted tax backed support programs implemented and a ripple effect begins concerning the environment.

Eventually, the consumer has to pay for it all.

Then there's all of those repossessed homes sitting empty in areas already developed.

It's like comparing it to the late 1950's and the car. Most families had one car. Later, two. By the time the cost of a car more than quadrupled, it seems that everyone had a car for every driver in the family, along with motorized toys like dirt bikes, ATVs and RVs. This was great for the automobile and gas industries.

The environmental impact was tremendous, much more harmful than the old clear cutting of timber and surpassing pre-EPA times of massive industrial pollution.

So, the secondary damage of massive development generates a long term cost to be spread out among the populace.

Over a 20 year period, this can surpass the original cost of a new home.

It's, IMO, like claiming the environmental pollution, a couple of hundred years back, in Europe, dropped sharply for a century or so and was a good thing. Except, it did so because 1/3 of the population was killed off by the Plague. It was also a great time for low unemployment, since most of the skilled working force was gone.

Technically, that was a 'good' thing but the secondary cost was high. Not to mention that the Dark Ages followed.

So, is building new homes a wise indicator of economic recovery?

08 Nov 2012 12:13 PM
rocketpants    [TotalFark]  
Wonderful. The faster my house gains value, the sooner I can get the eff out of Florida.

08 Nov 2012 12:56 PM
Buffalo77     
Rik01

Is it wise to base economic recovery on housing sales? The cost of an average home has been steadily spiraling upwards over the last 40 years, becoming one of the major expenses a consumer will invest in.

The impact on local areas is tremendous, as new land is cleared, new sanitation services installed, new roads built, the natural contours of the land changed, assorted tax backed support programs implemented and a ripple effect begins concerning the environment.

Eventually, the consumer has to pay for it all.

Then there's all of those repossessed homes sitting empty in areas already developed.

It's like comparing it to the late 1950's and the car. Most families had one car. Later, two. By the time the cost of a car more than quadrupled, it seems that everyone had a car for every driver in the family, along with motorized toys like dirt bikes, ATVs and RVs. This was great for the automobile and gas industries.

The environmental impact was tremendous, much more harmful than the old clear cutting of timber and surpassing pre-EPA times of massive industrial pollution.

So, the secondary damage of massive development generates a long term cost to be spread out among the populace.

Over a 20 year period, this can surpass the original cost of a new home.

It's, IMO, like claiming the environmental pollution, a couple of hundred years back, in Europe, dropped sharply for a century or so and was a good thing. Except, it did so because 1/3 of the population was killed off by the Plague. It was also a great time for low unemployment, since most of the skilled working force was gone.

Technically, that was a 'good' thing but the secondary cost was high. Not to mention that the Dark Ages followed.

So, is building new homes a wise indicator of economic recovery?


Yes

08 Nov 2012 01:02 PM
lude     
I look for the cost of housing in and around the White House to drop sooner or later, you can see how "white flight" has occurred as more minorities and renters move in.

//lude

08 Nov 2012 01:04 PM
ggecko     
It's easier to have a higher percentage gain when you start from a lower price.

A $5,000 rise on a $300,000 home is only 1.67% but a $5,000 rise on that $100,000 home (that was just $300,000 a couple years back and got beat to death) is a 5% rise.


But that aside, don't you love realtors? When prices go up they scream "BUY NOW before they go higher". When prices drop they scream "BUY NOW because they are at the bottom". Even the logic in this article, that rising prices encourage more to sell their homes to entice would-be buyers to purchase homes before prices rise further. Much of that is contradictory. If that logic was true, why did foreclosures which put more homes on the market, kill the home sales? More homes on the market means more people will buy them and will pay higher prices? DAFUQ. That only worked in early 2000's because banks were pretty much approving ANYONE so money was cheap and easy.


For FIVE YEARS now I read our local paper and EVERY SINGLE article they ever run (like this article) is from realtors and all it says is "BUY NOW".

08 Nov 2012 01:04 PM
Molavian     

lude: I look for the cost of housing in and around the White House to drop sooner or later, you can see how "white flight" has occurred as more minorities and renters move in.

//lude


lulz

08 Nov 2012 01:06 PM
DubyaHater     

Rik01: Is it wise to base economic recovery on housing sales? The cost of an average home has been steadily spiraling upwards over the last 40 years, becoming one of the major expenses a consumer will invest in.

The impact on local areas is tremendous, as new land is cleared, new sanitation services installed, new roads built, the natural contours of the land changed, assorted tax backed support programs implemented and a ripple effect begins concerning the environment.

Eventually, the consumer has to pay for it all.

Then there's all of those repossessed homes sitting empty in areas already developed.

It's like comparing it to the late 1950's and the car. Most families had one car. Later, two. By the time the cost of a car more than quadrupled, it seems that everyone had a car for every driver in the family, along with motorized toys like dirt bikes, ATVs and RVs. This was great for the automobile and gas industries.

The environmental impact was tremendous, much more harmful than the old clear cutting of timber and surpassing pre-EPA times of massive industrial pollution.

So, the secondary damage of massive development generates a long term cost to be spread out among the populace.

Over a 20 year period, this can surpass the original cost of a new home.

It's, IMO, like claiming the environmental pollution, a couple of hundred years back, in Europe, dropped sharply for a century or so and was a good thing. Except, it did so because 1/3 of the population was killed off by the Plague. It was also a great time for low unemployment, since most of the skilled working force was gone.

Technically, that was a 'good' thing but the secondary cost was high. Not to mention that the Dark Ages followed.

So, is building new homes a wise indicator of economic recovery?


Thinking is not allowed here. We will build more poorly constructed cookie-cutter homes. Sure the insulation was never installed, the outlets were never properly wired, the kitchen tile cracks after six months, the vinyl siding is falling off......but look, the house has four bedrooms and six bathrooms!!
To hell with the existing homes out there. The old owners probably pissed on the carpet and stole all the copper piping before they were evicted. Let them rot. We will cut down more trees and threaten the habitats of more animals in an attempt to cover the entire United States with cheap construction.
/New home construction is great
//but what kind of house is being built?

08 Nov 2012 01:07 PM
factoryconnection    [TotalFark]  

Rik01: So, is building new homes a wise indicator of economic recovery?


Not entirely but it sure is important to the home construction, renovation, furniture and moving industries, all of which were walloped by the recession.

Also, Subby: Nice.

08 Nov 2012 01:16 PM
JackieRabbit     
So does this mean I can once again go out and take a home equity loan for 240% of its value if I only have a part-time job at Burger King?

08 Nov 2012 01:17 PM
jst3p    [TotalFark]  

factoryconnection: Rik01: So, is building new homes a wise indicator of economic recovery?

Not entirely but it sure is important to the home construction, renovation, furniture and moving industries, all of which were walloped by the recession.

Also, Subby: Nice.


This and this.

08 Nov 2012 01:17 PM
DownDaRiver     
And that's just to alter the new chairs that Michelle has ordered so that they fit her huge ass better

08 Nov 2012 01:19 PM
redundantman     
Four more years of "thanks Fartbongo"

08 Nov 2012 01:24 PM
Fark Rye For Many Whores     
le-monde-selon-fernand.comView Full Size

08 Nov 2012 01:30 PM
cptjeff     
Housing prices are high "even" in Washington? Is subby high? In Washington, even a 10x12 room in a basement with rats will run you $500 a month if you're lucky. A room in a better neighborhood will run you a grand. Housing prices are insane here.

Yeah yeah, not the point I know, but "Even in Washington" doesn't really work when setting up a joke about housing prices.

08 Nov 2012 01:34 PM
Bijin     
Subby: Good work on this. Gave me a good laugh.

08 Nov 2012 01:40 PM
JackieRabbit     

cptjeff: Housing prices are high "even" in Washington? Is subby high? In Washington, even a 10x12 room in a basement with rats will run you $500 a month if you're lucky. A room in a better neighborhood will run you a grand. Housing prices are insane here.

Yeah yeah, not the point I know, but "Even in Washington" doesn't really work when setting up a joke about housing prices.


When I worked for the government, I was invited to DC for a three month rotational assignment. My agency had purchased some condos in a building just across the street to house employees on extended details to headquarters. But unfortunately, none of them were available for the time I would be there. So I'd have to find alternative housing. I couldn't find anything for less than $1500/mo and that was not in a very good neighborhood. This was back in the 90s, so I can't imagine how much it would cost now. Some of the younger employees lived way out in Maryland or Virginia and six or eight of them would share a small house. It's the only way they could afford to live.

08 Nov 2012 01:40 PM
azazyel     

cptjeff: Housing prices are high "even" in Washington? Is subby high? In Washington, even a 10x12 room in a basement with rats will run you $500 a month if you're lucky. A room in a better neighborhood will run you a grand. Housing prices are insane here.

Yeah yeah, not the point I know, but "Even in Washington" doesn't really work when setting up a joke about housing prices.


Sounds like Washington State (or at least around Seattle)

08 Nov 2012 01:47 PM
Fark_Guy_Rob     
I'm just hoping prices stay low for another 3 years until I can buy a house.

08 Nov 2012 01:56 PM
Debeo Summa Credo     

Rik01: It's, IMO, like claiming the environmental pollution, a couple of hundred years back, in Europe, dropped sharply for a century or so and was a good thing. Except, it did so because 1/3 of the population was killed off by the Plague. It was also a great time for low unemployment, since most of the skilled working force was gone.


Couple hundred?

Technically, that was a 'good' thing but the secondary cost was high. Not to mention that the Dark Ages followed.

Dark Ages preceded the Black Death.

08 Nov 2012 01:56 PM
HaywoodJablonski     
Is this the thread where we brag about our mortgages? Well alright.

I have a $5 million 2-year mortgage at 1% fixed. Paid it off in 2 months

08 Nov 2012 01:57 PM
que.guero     

cptjeff: Housing prices are high "even" in Washington? Is subby high? In Washington, even a 10x12 room in a basement with rats will run you $500 a month if you're lucky. A room in a better neighborhood will run you a grand. Housing prices are insane here.

Yeah yeah, not the point I know, but "Even in Washington" doesn't really work when setting up a joke about housing prices.



$500 a month for a basement-level shiathole sounds like a hell of a deal compared to Vancouver where basement "studios" start around $1200.

08 Nov 2012 02:09 PM
cptjeff     

que.guero: cptjeff: Housing prices are high "even" in Washington? Is subby high? In Washington, even a 10x12 room in a basement with rats will run you $500 a month if you're lucky. A room in a better neighborhood will run you a grand. Housing prices are insane here.

Yeah yeah, not the point I know, but "Even in Washington" doesn't really work when setting up a joke about housing prices.


$500 a month for a basement-level shiathole sounds like a hell of a deal compared to Vancouver where basement "studios" start around $1200.


Ah, but you get that "studio" to yourself. This is a room in a basement. You're also sharing the basement with a couple other people. 

And it was in Wheaton, which ain't exactly close to anything. Yes, I looked at this place. No, there weren't photos on the listing.

08 Nov 2012 02:21 PM
pjargon     
Actually the cost to get in the white house is ~$4 Billion, $2 Billion only gives you a 50/50 shot

09 Nov 2012 12:02 AM
Showing 1-26 of 26 comments
Refresh
This thread is closed to new comments.


Back To Main

More Headlines:
Main | Sports | Business | Geek | Entertainment | Politics | Video | FarkUs | Contests | Fark Party | Combined