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   Fifteen pictures of ugly-ass baby platypi--platypuses--whatever the hell it is

09 Nov 2012 12:15 PM   |   7163 clicks   |   Buzzfeed
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Grapple     
Hey.. Where's Perry?

09 Nov 2012 12:18 PM
enry    [TotalFark]  
Needs more fedoras.

09 Nov 2012 12:19 PM
abhorrent1     
They're cute. Until they jab you with that spine and kill you dead.

09 Nov 2012 12:19 PM
AbiNormal     
I was fine until the baby penguin. D'awwwww.....so cute.

09 Nov 2012 12:22 PM
Theaetetus    [TotalFark]  
That's terrifying! Doesn't that fool holding them know how poisonous they are?!

09 Nov 2012 12:22 PM
CygnusDarius     

abhorrent1: They're cute. Until they jab you with that spine and kill you dead.


Australia's official song.

09 Nov 2012 12:22 PM
DansLaLuna     
Puggles!

09 Nov 2012 12:23 PM
CygnusDarius     

DansLaLuna: Puggles!


farm2.static.flickr.comView Full Size

09 Nov 2012 12:25 PM
Purple_Paramecium    [TotalFark]  
They look delicious.

....what?

/D'awwwwwwwwww

09 Nov 2012 12:25 PM
Broktun     
art.ngfiles.comView Full Size
 

entimg.msn.comView Full Size

09 Nov 2012 12:25 PM
brantgoose    [TotalFark]  
I Googled. There is no official name for baby platypuses. It is a "common" misconception that they are called puggles. One person suggest platypups.

I would call them kittens or kits. Baby beavers are called kits and it just seems right to call baby platypuses (or platypi), kittens or kits as well. They can also be called pups though, so if you have your heart set on platypups, why not? Who cares? How many times do you need to talk about baby platypuses in a given year?

09 Nov 2012 12:27 PM
Surly U. Jest     

brantgoose: I Googled. There is no official name for baby platypuses. It is a "common" misconception that they are called puggles. One person suggest platypups.

I would call them kittens or kits. Baby beavers are called kits and it just seems right to call baby platypuses (or platypi), kittens or kits as well. They can also be called pups though, so if you have your heart set on platypups, why not? Who cares? How many times do you need to talk about baby platypuses in a given year?


Platypussies?

09 Nov 2012 12:32 PM
Gig103    [TotalFark]  
www.mikepirone.comView Full Size


PERRY THE PLATAPUS!!

09 Nov 2012 12:35 PM
foxyshadis     

brantgoose: I Googled. There is no official name for baby platypuses. It is a "common" misconception that they are called puggles. One person suggest platypups.

I would call them kittens or kits. Baby beavers are called kits and it just seems right to call baby platypuses (or platypi), kittens or kits as well. They can also be called pups though, so if you have your heart set on platypups, why not? Who cares? How many times do you need to talk about baby platypuses in a given year?



The "official" plural for platypus is platipode, much like octopode and antipode. But that's entirely based on a language no one has spoken in a thousand years and has nothing to do with how anyone actually speaks, plus let's be honest, a platypus is already a freak of nature as it is. I'd almost take it as a refutation of evolution, just based on the fact that they seem to be a collection of leftover parts of many different animals; maybe after cosmic game of Spore someone leftover evolution points at the end and went for teh lulz.

As for pups, well, platypups is just cute enough that I think it could make it. Puggles just sounds like a Harry Potter fan's pet.

09 Nov 2012 12:40 PM
Now I Is!     

09 Nov 2012 12:40 PM
Thats_Not_My_Baby     
This seems to be a good place for hippo gets explosive diarrhea 

Skip to ~00:45 (unless you like the majesty of walking hippos)

09 Nov 2012 12:44 PM
czetie     
Take your pick of platypuses or platypodes, but absolutely not "platypi".

Like "octopus", the "pus" refers to the Greek word for foot, and the Greek plural would be "podes". But since we speak English not Greek, "platypuses" and "octopuses" are perfectly acceptable English plural formations.

"Platypi" (and "octopi" for that matter) are simply nonsense, pretentious pseudo-Latin formations based on the misconception that the -us is a masculine singular Latin ending. Romanes eunt domus, indeed.

09 Nov 2012 12:44 PM
dennysgod     
25.media.tumblr.comView Full Size

09 Nov 2012 12:46 PM
Bermuda59     

Grapple: Hey.. Where's Perry?


Perry the Platypus, What an unexpected surprise. And by unexpected, I mean completely expected!

09 Nov 2012 12:52 PM
gunther_bumpass     

foxyshadis: brantgoose: I Googled. There is no official name for baby platypuses. It is a "common" misconception that they are called puggles. One person suggest platypups.

I would call them kittens or kits. Baby beavers are called kits and it just seems right to call baby platypuses (or platypi), kittens or kits as well. They can also be called pups though, so if you have your heart set on platypups, why not? Who cares? How many times do you need to talk about baby platypuses in a given year?


The "official" plural for platypus is platipode, much like octopode and antipode. But that's entirely based on a language no one has spoken in a thousand years and has nothing to do with how anyone actually speaks, plus let's be honest, a platypus is already a freak of nature as it is. I'd almost take it as a refutation of evolution, just based on the fact that they seem to be a collection of leftover parts of many different animals; maybe after cosmic game of Spore someone leftover evolution points at the end and went for teh lulz.



Left overs? No no - the article clearly states that it is a "mashup". A MASHUP.

Farking hate that word and all that use it.

09 Nov 2012 12:54 PM
maxx2112     
Needs more fez.

th00.deviantart.netView Full Size

09 Nov 2012 12:56 PM
The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men     
Note: Like most Aussie wildlife the Platypus is venomous.

Link

09 Nov 2012 01:03 PM
dustygrimp     
PHINEAS AND FERB THREAD!

09 Nov 2012 01:12 PM
foxyshadis     
Huh, looks like my link didn't come through, or an admin just hates me today.
www.mediafire.comView Full Size

www.mediafire.comView Full Size

09 Nov 2012 01:37 PM
Gordon Bennett     
Platypodes.

09 Nov 2012 01:40 PM
docbenspock     
images2.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size


\I don't know if this is fur or really tiny feathers. I can't tell. It's so warm, but it breathes

09 Nov 2012 02:09 PM
12monkeys     

Theaetetus: That's terrifying! Doesn't that fool holding them know how poisonous they are?!


In a thread where everyone is being pedantic about the proper pluralization of the word "platypus", I feel I should point out that they are venomous, not poisonous.

09 Nov 2012 02:09 PM
mc_hfcs     

czetie: Take your pick of platypuses or platypodes, but absolutely not "platypi".

Like "octopus", the "pus" refers to the Greek word for foot, and the Greek plural would be "podes". But since we speak English not Greek, "platypuses" and "octopuses" are perfectly acceptable English plural formations.

"Platypi" (and "octopi" for that matter) are simply nonsense, pretentious pseudo-Latin formations based on the misconception that the -us is a masculine singular Latin ending. Romanes eunt domus, indeed.


This, almost verbatim, is what I was going to post. It's good to know us pedantic f**ks all have the same info, at least! I do think "platypi" and "octopi" are OK, but only for humor/satire purposes. Mangling language for humorous reasons has been an English tradition since English broke off from German and attained all those Welsh properties.

One other "masculine singular Latin" misconception that bugs me is: "penis" is not pluralized as "penii". I know it looks and sounds kind of funny, but really, isn't "penes" (the true plural of that word) much funnier? At least when spoken? Think about it.

09 Nov 2012 03:07 PM
slimfast    [TotalFark]  
i46.tinypic.comView Full Size

09 Nov 2012 03:23 PM
baltimoreblonde     
Oh, there you are, Perry.

09 Nov 2012 03:24 PM
slimfast    [TotalFark]  
i48.tinypic.comView Full Size

09 Nov 2012 03:28 PM
Cheesehead_Dave    [TotalFark]  
They don't do much.

09 Nov 2012 03:40 PM
Gordon Bennett     

mc_hfcs: One other "masculine singular Latin" misconception that bugs me is: "penis" is not pluralized as "penii". I know it looks and sounds kind of funny, but really, isn't "penes" (the true plural of that word) much funnier? At least when spoken? Think about it.


Yes.

debtcrushingdad.comView Full Size

09 Nov 2012 03:44 PM
Kalashinator     

abhorrent1: They're cute. Until they jab you with that spine and kill you dead.


The venom hasn't killed any people, it just activates every last pain receptor in your body and doesn't respond to morphine. And lasts up to a few months. It can only kill you if you suck-start a 12-gauge to end it.

09 Nov 2012 03:45 PM
czetie     

mc_hfcs: czetie: Take your pick of platypuses or platypodes, but absolutely not "platypi".

Like "octopus", the "pus" refers to the Greek word for foot, and the Greek plural would be "podes". But since we speak English not Greek, "platypuses" and "octopuses" are perfectly acceptable English plural formations.

"Platypi" (and "octopi" for that matter) are simply nonsense, pretentious pseudo-Latin formations based on the misconception that the -us is a masculine singular Latin ending. Romanes eunt domus, indeed.

This, almost verbatim, is what I was going to post. It's good to know us pedantic f**ks all have the same info, at least! I do think "platypi" and "octopi" are OK, but only for humor/satire purposes. Mangling language for humorous reasons has been an English tradition since English broke off from German and attained all those Welsh properties.

One other "masculine singular Latin" misconception that bugs me is: "penis" is not pluralized as "penii". I know it looks and sounds kind of funny, but really, isn't "penes" (the true plural of that word) much funnier? At least when spoken? Think about it.


Personally I rarely have the need to refer to the penis in the plural, but YMMV.

Not remotely as funny but equally as pedantic is "virus", the plural of which is "viruses". The word doesn't have a plural in Latin at all, being a sort of aggregate noun like "stuff". 

/CSB: I'm the one who was proposing earlier in the week that the plural of "Austin Maxi" was either "Maxii" or "Maxin", so I'm all for mangling the language.

09 Nov 2012 04:37 PM
Lachwen     

mc_hfcs: czetie: Take your pick of platypuses or platypodes, but absolutely not "platypi".

Like "octopus", the "pus" refers to the Greek word for foot, and the Greek plural would be "podes". But since we speak English not Greek, "platypuses" and "octopuses" are perfectly acceptable English plural formations.

"Platypi" (and "octopi" for that matter) are simply nonsense, pretentious pseudo-Latin formations based on the misconception that the -us is a masculine singular Latin ending. Romanes eunt domus, indeed.

This, almost verbatim, is what I was going to post. It's good to know us pedantic f**ks all have the same info, at least! I do think "platypi" and "octopi" are OK, but only for humor/satire purposes. Mangling language for humorous reasons has been an English tradition since English broke off from German and attained all those Welsh properties.

One other "masculine singular Latin" misconception that bugs me is: "penis" is not pluralized as "penii". I know it looks and sounds kind of funny, but really, isn't "penes" (the true plural of that word) much funnier? At least when spoken? Think about it.


Would this be a good place for me to rant about how all food is "organic" no matter how it was grown? That's my favorite pedantic rant.

09 Nov 2012 05:06 PM
czetie     

Lachwen: Would this be a good place for me to rant about how all food is "organic" no matter how it was grown? That's my favorite pedantic rant.


You would be technically correct which, as we all know, is the best kind of correct.

09 Nov 2012 06:43 PM
Gig103    [TotalFark]  

Lachwen: Would this be a good place for me to rant about how all food is "organic" no matter how it was grown? That's my favorite pedantic rant.


My brain literally explodes when people buy organic food.

09 Nov 2012 08:47 PM
iron de havilland    [TotalFark]  

12monkeys: Theaetetus: That's terrifying! Doesn't that fool holding them know how poisonous they are?!

In a thread where everyone is being pedantic about the proper pluralization of the word "platypus", I feel I should point out that they are venomous, not poisonous.


Second. There are not a lot of venomous mammals, but platypuses are.

Poisonous mammals exist too.

/Have you met by brother's ex-wife?

09 Nov 2012 09:13 PM
OK So Amuse Me     

Kalashinator: abhorrent1: They're cute. Until they jab you with that spine and kill you dead.

The venom hasn't killed any people, it just activates every last pain receptor in your body and doesn't respond to morphine. And lasts up to a few months. It can only kill you if you suck-start a 12-gauge to end it.


Yikes! You sound like you may have come into contact with the business end of a platypus. Doesn't sound like much fun.

I think the tiniest ones are absolutely adorable!

10 Nov 2012 12:37 AM
NephilimNexus     
adaptivereuse.netView Full Size

10 Nov 2012 04:21 AM
Priapetic     

czetie: Lachwen: Would this be a good place for me to rant about how all food is "organic" no matter how it was grown? That's my favorite pedantic rant.

You would be technically correct which, as we all know, is the best kind of correct.


Excellent.

That being said, let me help you out, Lachwen and others struggling with this whole "organic foods" thing. In English you see, words frequently have more than one meaning. For example the word ring can be both a verb and an item of jewelry - ring the bell versus wear a ring. In the case of food, the scientific term "organic" - referring to compounds containing carbon and generally focused on biology has also been used to mean foods that have been grown or raised in a manner eschewing use of compounds not commonly found in nature - most commonly pesticides, antibiotics and growth hormones. The idea is that those compounds have seen explosive growth in their use in the last 20 years and since their long term impact on human growth and development is uncertain, avoidance is prudent. The exact definition of what constitutes "organic" is not well defined, but the general concept is widely understood.

/pedantic is just another way of saying asshole
//I understand you're speaking ironically Lach, but others mean it

10 Nov 2012 11:53 AM
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