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   CixelsyD yob saw detanimircsid tsniaga yb loohcs tcirtsid, emerpuS truoC selur

10 Nov 2012 12:33 PM   |   5120 clicks   |   Toronto Star
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calbert    [TotalFark]  
dyslexia isn't reading words backwards subby.


/get it right before your next lame attempt at an overused, unoriginal, unfunny headline

10 Nov 2012 11:25 AM
Revek     
Lets talk about the subbys genital warts.

10 Nov 2012 12:04 PM
sno man    [TotalFark]  
.ybbuS daB

But cool story. Good to see the family get a bit of compensation for their efforts for their son.

10 Nov 2012 12:11 PM
BokChoy     
Go to hell submitter

10 Nov 2012 12:35 PM
Ess_Aytch     
FTFA: "Students with special needs today have a wider variety of supports, funding and services available to them," he said in a statement.

I call a gigantic, steaming pile of bullshiat on that one. The trend today is to dump kids with special needs into regular classrooms in the name of inclusiveness, but provide limited resources, at best, to help those kids. Teachers spend most of their time with the special needs and other lower kids, while average students are left to fend for themselves.

10 Nov 2012 12:38 PM
Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener     
CixelsyD

It's like Claritin-D, but for Mr. Mxyzptlk's people.

10 Nov 2012 12:39 PM
Monkey MKIII     
I also have sexDaily

10 Nov 2012 12:45 PM
zulius     

Ess_Aytch: FTFA: "Students with special needs today have a wider variety of supports, funding and services available to them," he said in a statement.

I call a gigantic, steaming pile of bullshiat on that one. The trend today is to dump kids with special needs into regular classrooms in the name of inclusiveness, but provide limited resources, at best, to help those kids. Teachers spend most of their time with the special needs and other lower kids, while average students are left to fend for themselves.


It's been 20 years since I've been in this "program," and sadly,i hope I'm not agreeing. Developmentally, i was behind, but appearance? "normal." So, i was sent to fend for myself, save a few hours with the school psychologist a week...
I would hope things were better now, apparently not...

10 Nov 2012 12:46 PM
PsychoLaurie     

Ess_Aytch: FTFA: "Students with special needs today have a wider variety of supports, funding and services available to them," he said in a statement.

I call a gigantic, steaming pile of bullshiat on that one. The trend today is to dump kids with special needs into regular classrooms in the name of inclusiveness, but provide limited resources, at best, to help those kids. Teachers spend most of their time with the special needs and other lower kids, while average students are left to fend for themselves.


Very true. The kids who are gifted also get no support. This is supposed to make sure no child is left behind, but everyone gets left behind. As a teacher, I spent more time modifying lesson plans than I did writing them along with endless hours of special ed meetings that accomplished nothing other than making kids cry. It's even worse now with teaching to the test. Those scores are the only thing schools really care about now.

10 Nov 2012 12:48 PM
SnarfVader     
After reading that headline, I have a achehead.

10 Nov 2012 12:48 PM
sandbar67     
Has anyone mentioned that subby is a dumbass yet?

10 Nov 2012 12:51 PM
Drubell     
Well congrats on your greenlight, subby, I guess.

10 Nov 2012 12:52 PM
Martonio     
Wow, he wrote the headline backwards...how original.

10 Nov 2012 12:59 PM
RedVentrue     

PsychoLaurie: Ess_Aytch: FTFA: "Students with special needs today have a wider variety of supports, funding and services available to them," he said in a statement.

I call a gigantic, steaming pile of bullshiat on that one. The trend today is to dump kids with special needs into regular classrooms in the name of inclusiveness, but provide limited resources, at best, to help those kids. Teachers spend most of their time with the special needs and other lower kids, while average students are left to fend for themselves.

Very true. The kids who are gifted also get no support. This is supposed to make sure no child is left behind, but everyone gets left behind. As a teacher, I spent more time modifying lesson plans than I did writing them along with endless hours of special ed meetings that accomplished nothing other than making kids cry. It's even worse now with teaching to the test. Those scores are the only thing schools really care about now.


What about gifted dyslexics?

10 Nov 2012 01:01 PM
danielscissorhands     

Martonio: Wow, he wrote the headline backwards...how original.


Actually, no he didn't. He wrote the individual words backwards.

10 Nov 2012 01:02 PM
Cambrian     
ybbus DAOF

10 Nov 2012 01:04 PM
skinbubble    [TotalFark]  
25.media.tumblr.comView Full Size


/oblig

10 Nov 2012 01:06 PM
Honest Bender    [TotalFark]  
Talk like Yoda, subby does. At the end of the sentence, subby puts the subject. Very annoying, that writing style is.

10 Nov 2012 01:08 PM
tudorgurl    [TotalFark]  

PsychoLaurie: Ess_Aytch: FTFA: "Students with special needs today have a wider variety of supports, funding and services available to them," he said in a statement.

I call a gigantic, steaming pile of bullshiat on that one. The trend today is to dump kids with special needs into regular classrooms in the name of inclusiveness, but provide limited resources, at best, to help those kids. Teachers spend most of their time with the special needs and other lower kids, while average students are left to fend for themselves.

Very true. The kids who are gifted also get no support. This is supposed to make sure no child is left behind, but everyone gets left behind. As a teacher, I spent more time modifying lesson plans than I did writing them along with endless hours of special ed meetings that accomplished nothing other than making kids cry. It's even worse now with teaching to the test. Those scores are the only thing schools really care about now.


So much this.

10 Nov 2012 01:08 PM
Fark Rye For Many Whores     

calbert: dyslexia isn't reading words backwards subby.


/get it right before your next lame attempt at an overused, unoriginal, unfunny headline


img827.imageshack.usView Full Size

10 Nov 2012 01:10 PM
traylor     
FYI Subby, Vancouver is not located in Australia.

10 Nov 2012 01:10 PM
Fark Rye For Many Whores     

traylor: FYI Subby, Vancouver is not located in Australia.


img191.imageshack.usView Full Size

10 Nov 2012 01:14 PM
sheep snorter     
Oh noes. the government has to properly teach all our childrens. The horrorrrrrrrrrrrr. Good on the system for finally recognizing that the school system is a clusterf*ck. Panic has set in and now money needs to be cut from other things, but not the yearly retreat at the spa for all government/school board members.

Schools in BC have been farked up for decades. It all started with asshole politicians who changed the rules of a polite society(people stomp their feet since our laws are not the same as that other country they came from) to be sure that they would get the votes of non-BC born peoples.
ex:
English as a second language(mainly chinese immigrants kids,born in canada or born in china, being let into school who spoke/read zero English). It was a major drain on the budget.
The derelicts of schooling(slackers, deviants, mentally challenged) were once shuttled off to their own special classes in that one room school building in the middle of nowhere(or that special one room in the regular school). The government didn't really care if they succeed but then again BC doesn't put kids in prison for dropping out of school at 15. 
Older schools that were on multiple levels that were never wheelchair friendly and once it was, the regular kids had to keep being told that the elevator was not for them. 20 steps is so tiring after a long day of farting in class and blaming the usual punching bag.

10 Nov 2012 01:14 PM
special20    [TotalFark]  

traylor: FYI Subby, Vancouver is not located in Australia.


That's right Smitty, if Vancouver was located in Austria, they'd spell it "Wancüferberg".

10 Nov 2012 01:17 PM
Vangor     

PsychoLaurie: The kids who are gifted also get no support.


Let me say as a gifted educator, 'also get no support' is inaccurate; at least in the United States, services for students with disabilities are required and funded. Few states mandate and fund gifted identification and services, and of those there are perhaps two or three with quality identification criteria and service requirements. There is practically no support staff for gifted, school psychologists (often integral in identification and servicing) have no knowledge of gifted, and teachers are mired in misconceptions which negatively influence identification and servicing practices. I wish I could say gifted get the nonsupport disabilities receives... would be an improvement.

But, I do agree, the services for students with disabilities are frequently ineffective and minimal to appear compliant with the law, and this is shameful. Teachers of exceptionalities are dedicated to those students yet bogged in paperwork, excessive data gathering, limited resources, and more.

In either end of the spectrum, when the support staff, teachers, and administration create a cohesive policy which involves all stakeholders, including parents, you see great returns. What we have is tons of isolation, worrying about different aspects with lack of communication and opportunities to collaborate. Always an uphill battle, though.

10 Nov 2012 01:19 PM
Akbar the Trappiste Monk     
YOB.

www.metalblade.comView Full Size

10 Nov 2012 01:23 PM
Fark_Guy_Rob     
I really don't see the point of this lawsuit.

His parents sent him to a 'private school'. The article doesn't say anything about him excelling at the private school that would indicate horrible neglect at the public school. He was the 'most improved'. Gee, well that's an awfully subjective award, isn't it? When I used to suck at baseball, I got the most improved award. I didn't improve, it's just they couldn't give me much else without everyone knowing it was a load of crap.

Did his private education end with him going on to some fancy college or publishing some great scientific discovery? No.

He went on to be a plumber.

I have nothing against plumbers. I've done some plumbing myself. It's absolutely as respectable a job as any other. But come'on. At the age of 25 he's a plumber and HE STILL NEEDS TO TELL PEOPLE ABOUT HIS LEARNING DISORDER.

All of that fancy 'private school' education hasn't allowed him to function at a level where he fells comfortable NOT DISCLOSING his disability. Stop and think about that. Whatever problems a dyslexic child might have, he is still unable to overcome. He went out of his to point out he suffers from a disability. Thankfully, it doesn't interfere with his ability to be plumber.

I'm still not convinced he benefited in any way from the private school.
If he did benefit, it sure seems like must have been a small one.

Beyond that, I'm pretty sure MOST students would do marginally better at more expensive private schools than their public equivalents.

10 Nov 2012 01:23 PM
D2theMcV     
*looks at pic after reading headline*

I can't believe no one else has pointed out that this boy is "twice exceptional!" He's dyslexic and suffers from gigantism!

*reads article*

I can't believe a newspaper is paying good money to whoever wrote this headline!

10 Nov 2012 01:26 PM
BeerGraduate     

Honest Bender: Talk like Yoda, subby does. At the end of the sentence, subby puts the subject. Very annoying, that writing style is.


Go enjoy you're Disney elves sell-out.

10 Nov 2012 01:26 PM
Vangor     

Fark_Guy_Rob: Beyond that, I'm pretty sure MOST students would do marginally better at more expensive private schools than their public equivalents.


Not if most students were in private schools. Private schools choose the student body, basically. Lack adequate academic progress? Are a behavioral issue? Not from a family of means or family involved enough to receive support? You will not attend (this varies greatly school to school, of course, but I have not found this varies by much). My school has challenges which private schools simply never face.

10 Nov 2012 01:32 PM
sno man    [TotalFark]  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I really don't see the point of this lawsuit.

His parents sent him to a 'private school'. The article doesn't say anything about him excelling at the private school that would indicate horrible neglect at the public school. He was the 'most improved'. Gee, well that's an awfully subjective award, isn't it? When I used to suck at baseball, I got the most improved award. I didn't improve, it's just they couldn't give me much else without everyone knowing it was a load of crap.

Did his private education end with him going on to some fancy college or publishing some great scientific discovery? No.

He went on to be a plumber.

I have nothing against plumbers. I've done some plumbing myself. It's absolutely as respectable a job as any other. But come'on. At the age of 25 he's a plumber and HE STILL NEEDS TO TELL PEOPLE ABOUT HIS LEARNING DISORDER.

All of that fancy 'private school' education hasn't allowed him to function at a level where he fells comfortable NOT DISCLOSING his disability. Stop and think about that. Whatever problems a dyslexic child might have, he is still unable to overcome. He went out of his to point out he suffers from a disability. Thankfully, it doesn't interfere with his ability to be plumber.

I'm still not convinced he benefited in any way from the private school.
If he did benefit, it sure seems like must have been a small one.

Beyond that, I'm pretty sure MOST students would do marginally better at more expensive private schools than their public equivalents.


Most students parents wouldn't win the cost of that private education back by taking the case all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada either. Which might be why the 25 year old is still talking about it, with the ruling just having come down and all. The school board had a program that they cancelled stranding this kid. Parents put him in a school where he would get the extra attention he needed. Did you read the article?

10 Nov 2012 01:33 PM
Flragnararch     
Stop me if you've heard this one before: so these two dislexics walk into a bra...

10 Nov 2012 01:37 PM
lousyskater     
i2.kym-cdn.comView Full Size


Dyslexia does not work that way!

10 Nov 2012 01:38 PM
Honest Bender    [TotalFark]  

BeerGraduate: Go enjoy you're Disney elves sell-out.


This is going to shock you, but I'm not actually a character from star wars... I know, I know. I referenced yoda. I can see how that might confuse a person of lesser intelligence. I apologize. Here's a bit of string and some shiny foil. Go play quietly while the adults finish talking.

10 Nov 2012 01:39 PM
Fark_Guy_Rob     

sno man: Fark_Guy_Rob: I really don't see the point of this lawsuit.

His parents sent him to a 'private school'. The article doesn't say anything about him excelling at the private school that would indicate horrible neglect at the public school. He was the 'most improved'. Gee, well that's an awfully subjective award, isn't it? When I used to suck at baseball, I got the most improved award. I didn't improve, it's just they couldn't give me much else without everyone knowing it was a load of crap.

Did his private education end with him going on to some fancy college or publishing some great scientific discovery? No.

He went on to be a plumber.

I have nothing against plumbers. I've done some plumbing myself. It's absolutely as respectable a job as any other. But come'on. At the age of 25 he's a plumber and HE STILL NEEDS TO TELL PEOPLE ABOUT HIS LEARNING DISORDER.

All of that fancy 'private school' education hasn't allowed him to function at a level where he fells comfortable NOT DISCLOSING his disability. Stop and think about that. Whatever problems a dyslexic child might have, he is still unable to overcome. He went out of his to point out he suffers from a disability. Thankfully, it doesn't interfere with his ability to be plumber.

I'm still not convinced he benefited in any way from the private school.
If he did benefit, it sure seems like must have been a small one.

Beyond that, I'm pretty sure MOST students would do marginally better at more expensive private schools than their public equivalents.

Most students parents wouldn't win the cost of that private education back by taking the case all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada either. Which might be why the 25 year old is still talking about it, with the ruling just having come down and all. The school board had a program that they cancelled stranding this kid. Parents put him in a school where he would get the extra attention he needed. Did you read the article?


I read the article, yes.

The implication of the ruling and of the article is that the public school *failed* and forced him to go to a private school in order to get a proper education. I would expect someone who received a proper education to be able to work as a plumber without disclosing their learning disability.

There wasn't any objective measure of his academic achievements included in the article.

My question to you is What evidence is there that the private school performed better than the public school in educating this boy?.

There certainly isn't any evidence presented in the article.

10 Nov 2012 01:41 PM
Wizard Drongo     

PsychoLaurie: Ess_Aytch: FTFA: "Students with special needs today have a wider variety of supports, funding and services available to them," he said in a statement.

I call a gigantic, steaming pile of bullshiat on that one. The trend today is to dump kids with special needs into regular classrooms in the name of inclusiveness, but provide limited resources, at best, to help those kids. Teachers spend most of their time with the special needs and other lower kids, while average students are left to fend for themselves.

Very true. The kids who are gifted also get no support. This is supposed to make sure no child is left behind, but everyone gets left behind. As a teacher, I spent more time modifying lesson plans than I did writing them along with endless hours of special ed meetings that accomplished nothing other than making kids cry. It's even worse now with teaching to the test. Those scores are the only thing schools really care about now.


Yep. Happens here in the UK. I was completely screwed by the school system. Sure I had some emotional issues (my mom was very sick for most of my childhood and died when I was 14), but the real issue was that I was very "gifted", and was completely left to fend for myself. Minimal social skills (bordering on Aspergers I suspect), which got me picked on and isolated, and a grasp of the curriculum at least 2-3 years ahead of everyone else meant school was unpleasant for me. Got zero support WHATSOEVER.
If I'd been dyslexic, or had learning difficulties, I 'd have had a full-time support worker, specialised lessons etc.
Instead, I got stuck in with people years below me, revising work 3 or 4 times I'd gotten on the first run through, and so was painfully bored...became disruptive, developed an attention deficit (hard to pay attention when you're bored out your head), and ironically, got transferred into a lower set where the teacher isn't trying to ram in as much and the pupils aren't really trying to learn as hard (and so won't be so easily distracted)...and so learnt even less and became even more bored.
Eventually I was isolated by means of making me sit in the supply cupboard and told to "learn pages 25-30 today", and so predictably learned feck all.
I can see, clearly, now, classic oveachiever with minimal social skills and attention problems. Required in-depth support and an advanced curriculum to keep interested.
My only question is could they just no see that? Or could they see it, but lacked the resources, or maybe just didn't care enough, to do anything about it.

Either way, I'm responsible as well, but they must take some of the blame that people who were decidedly less capable than me in my class now have PhD's and are working towards becoming professors etc. and I barely managed a BSc. and even that took until my mid-twenties when I was controlled enough and had the right support to re-engage with education.
I feel failed by state-schooling.

10 Nov 2012 01:43 PM
Surpheon     

PsychoLaurie: The kids who are gifted also get no support.


Boo farking hoo. That's like complaining the best swimmers don't have to take swim lessons before being let loose on the camp beach. If the gifted also have disabilities, they absolutely require support and assistance. Social problems are a big deal; bullying the nerd still seems popular and boredom can lead to acting out - the gifted need good support to protect them from the standard cruelty of cliques.

But in general, with minimal accommodation (a decent library, some basic but unlocked computers in lab, acceptance that skipping recess to read is OK, etc) the most gifted can find their own way to more advanced subjects with minimal assistance.

Kids with learning disabilities will drown in the modern world if they aren't taught to swim before being let loose on the beach of life. Investing in teaching them the basics they need to best contribute to society is clearly a priority over helping the Michael Phelps' of the world shave a hundredth of a second off their time.

/4.0 GPA through High School, but not particularly gifted - just a shallow pond.

10 Nov 2012 01:46 PM
MayContainHorseGluten     
image.legios.orgView Full Size

10 Nov 2012 01:48 PM
Martonio     

sheep snorter: Oh noes. the government has to properly teach all our childrens. The horrorrrrrrrrrrrr. Good on the system for finally recognizing that the school system is a clusterf*ck. Panic has set in and now money needs to be cut from other things, but not the yearly retreat at the spa for all government/school board members.

Schools in BC have been farked up for decades. It all started with asshole politicians who changed the rules of a polite society(people stomp their feet since our laws are not the same as that other country they came from) to be sure that they would get the votes of non-BC born peoples.
ex:
English as a second language(mainly chinese immigrants kids,born in canada or born in china, being let into school who spoke/read zero English). It was a major drain on the budget.
The derelicts of schooling(slackers, deviants, mentally challenged) were once shuttled off to their own special classes in that one room school building in the middle of nowhere(or that special one room in the regular school). The government didn't really care if they succeed but then again BC doesn't put kids in prison for dropping out of school at 15. 
Older schools that were on multiple levels that were never wheelchair friendly and once it was, the regular kids had to keep being told that the elevator was not for them. 20 steps is so tiring after a long day of farting in class and blaming the usual punching bag.


4 words: Christy "The Dummy" Clark

/worst thing for BC education....well, ever

10 Nov 2012 01:49 PM
BeerGraduate     
Nothing personal to those with dyslexia but y'all should learn how to read..

10 Nov 2012 01:50 PM
Surpheon     

Wizard Drongo: classic oveachiever with minimal social skills and attention problems.


Interesting definition of overachiever since you appeared to lack (and were grossly let down by the educational system) rudimentary skills absolutely critical for success in most modern occupations, ie social skills and the ability to focus on repetitive tasks.

The problem isn't that you were a neglected gifted student. It was that the educational system failed to properly identify and teach you the important skill sets that you were deficient in.

10 Nov 2012 01:51 PM
sno man    [TotalFark]  

Fark_Guy_Rob: [youread thi already]...

I read the article, yes.

The implication of the ruling and of the article is that the public school *failed* and forced him to go to a private school in order to get a proper education. I would expect someone who received a proper education to be able to work as a plumber without disclosing their learning disability.

There wasn't any objective measure of his academic achievements included in the article.

My question to you is What evidence is there that the private school performed better than the public school in educating this boy?.

There certainly isn't any evidence presented in the article.


FTA: "Within the public system, Jeffrey Moore was left feeling alienated. In Grade 3 he still wasn't able to read.

"Everyone was moving forward and I wasn't doing the same work," he told reporters. "I was put in a corner and given things to colour.""

Seems like public school was failing him. That and there had been a program that was cancelled as a cost cutting measure, so there was no safety net in the public system. He's probably still not a big reader, which probably explains being a plumber rather than a cubicle jockey.

10 Nov 2012 01:53 PM
CoffeeMug     
If life gives you melons, you might be dyslexic...

10 Nov 2012 02:02 PM
Fark_Guy_Rob     

sno man: Fark_Guy_Rob: [youread thi already]...

I read the article, yes.

The implication of the ruling and of the article is that the public school *failed* and forced him to go to a private school in order to get a proper education. I would expect someone who received a proper education to be able to work as a plumber without disclosing their learning disability.

There wasn't any objective measure of his academic achievements included in the article.

My question to you is What evidence is there that the private school performed better than the public school in educating this boy?.

There certainly isn't any evidence presented in the article.


FTA: "Within the public system, Jeffrey Moore was left feeling alienated. In Grade 3 he still wasn't able to read.

"Everyone was moving forward and I wasn't doing the same work," he told reporters. "I was put in a corner and given things to colour.""

Seems like public school was failing him. That and there had been a program that was cancelled as a cost cutting measure, so there was no safety net in the public system. He's probably still not a big reader, which probably explains being a plumber rather than a cubicle jockey.


We know that in Grade 3 he was behind his peers.
We know that at Age 25 he was behind his peers.

It's very difficult to say that the private school performed better than the public school with the information mentioned in the article. The article doesn't mention when the special program was cancelled or what measurable decline in performance there was from the program being taken away. It also doesn't mention if the private school had a special program for dyslexics or not.

10 Nov 2012 02:05 PM
Vangor     

Surpheon: That's like complaining the best swimmers don't have to take swim lessons before being let loose on the camp beach.


Being a "best swimmer" requires access to proper training grounds, frequent training, guided training with a proper coach, motivation, etc.. There is significant resistance for services such as acceleration and grouping by administration and teachers despite all available research supporting social, emotional, cognitive, and academic outcomes. Further, extremely few people in schools are properly equipped to identify the gifted, and the environment simply does not allow them to express all manner of domains of giftedness, definitely not any great extent. Being gifted in school is akin to the best swimmers sitting in the sandbox for several years before being forced to doggy paddle while wearing floaties in the shallow end of the pool.

Surpheon: Social problems are a big deal; bullying the nerd still seems popular and boredom can lead to acting out - the gifted need good support to protect them from the standard cruelty of cliques.


Gifted are not necessarily nerds, and nerds are not necessarily gifted. I find little overlap, actually. The majority of my gifted students are extremely outgoing leaders, athletes, performers, etc., who happen to retain and retrieve certain concepts faster. Gifted students to be too active to be comparable the cliched nerd being bullied. Bullying and boredom are not the only emotional issues, either, as achievement becomes central to the identity of many gifted students, and peer, parental, and teacher expectations place enormous pressures to perform not only in desired tasks but an overwhelming amount of undesired tasks.

Surpheon: But in general, with minimal accommodation (a decent library, some basic but unlocked computers in lab, acceptance that skipping recess to read is OK, etc) the most gifted can find their own way to more advanced subjects with minimal assistance.


Which might service a limited selection of linguistic and academic, moderately gifted students provided the school environment allows them to pursue reading and research when work is completed or preassessed out of. You have a narrow conception of gifted.

10 Nov 2012 02:05 PM
Wizard Drongo     

Surpheon: Wizard Drongo: classic oveachiever with minimal social skills and attention problems.

Interesting definition of overachiever since you appeared to lack (and were grossly let down by the educational system) rudimentary skills absolutely critical for success in most modern occupations, ie social skills and the ability to focus on repetitive tasks.

The problem isn't that you were a neglected gifted student. It was that the educational system failed to properly identify and teach you the important skill sets that you were deficient in.


Exactly - I meant overachiever in terms of academics. ie I was reading and understand degree-level texts at 13, not 21. I learned the social skills I need to survive after leaving school, entering college, and finding a good woman. But the repetitive tasks I still find hard. Medication helps with that but even then, had I had that support in school I might have been better, but I didn't "qualify" for support, since I was clearly fine as I got 100% on every test.

10 Nov 2012 02:08 PM
rhondajeremy     

RedVentrue: PsychoLaurie: Ess_Aytch: FTFA: "Students with special needs today have a wider variety of supports, funding and services available to them," he said in a statement.

I call a gigantic, steaming pile of bullshiat on that one. The trend today is to dump kids with special needs into regular classrooms in the name of inclusiveness, but provide limited resources, at best, to help those kids. Teachers spend most of their time with the special needs and other lower kids, while average students are left to fend for themselves.

Very true. The kids who are gifted also get no support. This is supposed to make sure no child is left behind, but everyone gets left behind. As a teacher, I spent more time modifying lesson plans than I did writing them along with endless hours of special ed meetings that accomplished nothing other than making kids cry. It's even worse now with teaching to the test. Those scores are the only thing schools really care about now.

What about gifted dyslexics?


www.globalnewspointer.netView Full Size


Ask him. He dropped out of school & did OK.

10 Nov 2012 02:09 PM
orbister     

Martonio: Wow, he wrote the headline backwards...how original.


Since reading and writing backwards are fairly common symptoms of dyslexia, it seems reasonably apt. Here's what www.dyslexia.com (OK, they are trying to sell stuff) has to say about the symptoms:

The letters of some words might appear completely backwards, such as the word bird looking like drib

and here's what the UK Dyslexia Teaching website uses as an illustration of dyslexic writing in its list of symptoms

www.dyslexia-teacher.co.ukView Full Size

10 Nov 2012 02:19 PM
orbister     

Surpheon: But in general, with minimal accommodation (a decent library, some basic but unlocked computers in lab, acceptance that skipping recess to read is OK, etc) the most gifted can find their own way to more advanced subjects with minimal assistance.


They can get so much further, though, if actively encouraged. Saying "you're bright, you'll cope, read a book or something and get out of my way" wastes a lot of talent - and causes a lot of frustration and misbehaviour. A lot of disruption in schools comes from frustrated bright kids.

10 Nov 2012 02:22 PM
LordOfThePings     
Discrimination: having your special program ended and getting treated the same as everyone else.

Equality: getting more support and resources than others.

I think subby has his right, it's backwards day. (Not saying it's the wrong result, just that it's inconceivable that words mean what you think they mean.)

10 Nov 2012 02:44 PM
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