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   Parents: "Your new-fangled liquid pool cover is destroying the health of our swim-team snowflakes." School system: "Really? Because we ran out before swim practice started this year and haven't been using it"

12 Nov 2012 05:10 PM   |   27802 clicks   |   Ann Arbor News
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nmrsnr    [TotalFark]  
Ah, placebo effect, what can't it do?

12 Nov 2012 02:16 PM
Mr. Coffee Nerves    [TotalFark]  
A true athlete understands dodging squirrel corpses is part of the challenge

12 Nov 2012 02:18 PM
ZAZ    [TotalFark]  
How is a product based on isopropyl alcohol not miscible with water?

12 Nov 2012 02:24 PM
kronicfeld    [TotalFark]  
Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?

12 Nov 2012 02:24 PM
Benevolent Misanthrope    [TotalFark]  
Have they looked into any diet drugs, "cleansing" regimens or other faddish things that teenage girls are wont to do? Or would that be useless, considering that NONE of THEIR girls would do something like that, and every problem is someone else's fault...

12 Nov 2012 02:26 PM
wambu     
Years ago my neighbor put up a 50 foot tower for his ham radio, but broke his hand and was unable to complete the project for several months. During that time, other neighbors filed complaints with the FCC alledging interference with their TVs (no cable back then, it was all OTA). Of course, there was no intereferencem but the neighbors finally got the FCC to send an engineer out who determined that the interference was coming from a 500-watt linear amplifier that the loudest complainier was using with his CB who promptly had all his CB equipment siezed. The compaining guy turned into a total get-off-my-lawn asshat after that and the entire neighborhood was relieved when he moved to a gated community a few years after that. He must have been hell on the HOA.

12 Nov 2012 02:29 PM
brigid_fitch    [TotalFark]  

kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?


Not subby but I agree w/his snowflake assessment. Let's see--different teams using the pool with no ill effects. There's an article on AnnArbor.com about the new pool cover and the parents of the girl's swim team "suddenly" report all these symptoms. And, after they're told the chemical hasn't been present for weeks, they don't want to talk to the media.

Rashes? unusual itchiness, excessive hair loss---ask the girls on the team if they've discovered some new lotion or hair conditioner. I'll bet you'll find your answer there.

12 Nov 2012 02:37 PM
NowhereMon     

ZAZ: How is a product based on isopropyl alcohol not miscible with water?


It also contains 5% of some kind of organic surfactant that probably keeps the IPA from going into solution. The IPA is attracted to the non-polar, hydrophobic end of the surfactant while the polar end points towards the H20. The whole shebang probably forms micelles that float on the top of the pool.

12 Nov 2012 02:39 PM
RedPhoenix122    [TotalFark]  

wambu: Years ago my neighbor put up a 50 foot tower for his ham radio, but broke his hand and was unable to complete the project for several months. During that time, other neighbors filed complaints with the FCC alledging interference with their TVs (no cable back then, it was all OTA). Of course, there was no intereferencem but the neighbors finally got the FCC to send an engineer out who determined that the interference was coming from a 500-watt linear amplifier that the loudest complainier was using with his CB who promptly had all his CB equipment siezed. The compaining guy turned into a total get-off-my-lawn asshat after that and the entire neighborhood was relieved when he moved to a gated community a few years after that. He must have been hell on the HOA.


As a Ham Radio operator, HA HA!

12 Nov 2012 02:46 PM
This About That    [TotalFark]  

kronicfeld: rub some dirt on it?


Of course not. One should blame the most recent thing one has vaguely heard about, and possibly file a lawsuit. And while you are at it, exaggerate the supposed symptoms publicly.

12 Nov 2012 02:50 PM
propasaurus    [TotalFark]  

brigid_fitch: kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?

Not subby but I agree w/his snowflake assessment. Let's see--different teams using the pool with no ill effects. There's an article on AnnArbor.com about the new pool cover and the parents of the girl's swim team "suddenly" report all these symptoms. And, after they're told the chemical hasn't been present for weeks, they don't want to talk to the media.

Rashes? unusual itchiness, excessive hair loss---ask the girls on the team if they've discovered some new lotion or hair conditioner. I'll bet you'll find your answer there.


I'm going to say you both have a point. It's not unreasonable for parents to question if the new liquid cover could be a factor in the symptoms. And they absolutely should consider other possible causes.

/kumbaya

12 Nov 2012 02:50 PM
Osomatic     
There goes your lawsuit, parents. I'd say sorry, but I'm not.

12 Nov 2012 02:55 PM
scottydoesntknow    [TotalFark]  
www.poopthereitis.comView Full Size

12 Nov 2012 02:59 PM
TheBeastOfYuccaFlats    [TotalFark]  

kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?


The parents were just trying to explain away the fact that their kids are teenagers and have, y'know, farked up bodies as per normal.

Either that or their kids are doing meth.

12 Nov 2012 03:10 PM
brigid_fitch    [TotalFark]  

wambu: Years ago my neighbor put up a 50 foot tower for his ham radio, but broke his hand and was unable to complete the project for several months. During that time, other neighbors filed complaints with the FCC alledging interference with their TVs (no cable back then, it was all OTA). Of course, there was no intereferencem but the neighbors finally got the FCC to send an engineer out who determined that the interference was coming from a 500-watt linear amplifier that the loudest complainier was using with his CB who promptly had all his CB equipment siezed. The compaining guy turned into a total get-off-my-lawn asshat after that and the entire neighborhood was relieved when he moved to a gated community a few years after that. He must have been hell on the HOA.


Not to threadjack, but that reminds me of a story I heard on local radio a couple of years ago. Woman called in to complain about her town's zoning board. Her neighbor was building a catapult in his backyard. After it was about 1/2-built, it was pretty farking big and she asked him what it was for. He explained he was building it to take to Punkin' Chunkin' (she had no clue what it was) and freaked out. She was worried about a child getting hurt on it (Think of the children!) so called the zoning board. Zoning officer came out, spoke to the guy, and decided that it wasn't a violation (not a permanent structure). Then, since the officer was already in the neighborhood, decided to check out all the houses.

Woman got slammed with a couple thousand in fines for not having a permit for her garage, a back deck. and a few other additions she'd never applied for permits on.

Moral: Don't be so quick to start complaining about what your neighbors are doing just because you don't understand it.

12 Nov 2012 03:11 PM
OtherLittleGuy    [TotalFark]  

propasaurus: brigid_fitch: kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?

Not subby but I agree w/his snowflake assessment. Let's see--different teams using the pool with no ill effects. There's an article on AnnArbor.com about the new pool cover and the parents of the girl's swim team "suddenly" report all these symptoms. And, after they're told the chemical hasn't been present for weeks, they don't want to talk to the media.

Rashes? unusual itchiness, excessive hair loss---ask the girls on the team if they've discovered some new lotion or hair conditioner. I'll bet you'll find your answer there.

I'm going to say you both have a point. It's not unreasonable for parents to question if the new liquid cover could be a factor in the symptoms. And they absolutely should consider other possible causes.

/kumbaya


Nope, the parents will blame it on the placebo, and start a movement to have placebos removed from the medical field.

/never underestimate the stupidity of helpcopter parents

12 Nov 2012 03:11 PM
kronicfeld    [TotalFark]  

This About That: Of course not. One should blame the most recent thing one has vaguely heard about, and possibly file a lawsuit. And while you are at it, exaggerate the supposed symptoms publicly.


Nothing about a lawsuit in the story. Nothing to suggest any symptoms were publicly exaggerated. The students apparently have a common connection in that they were on the swim team and experiencing the same symptoms. The parents talked to the school about it in an apparent effort to find out what the cause was. What part of this supposed to be stroking my outrage gland?

Lots of projection in this thread.

12 Nov 2012 03:14 PM
namatad    [TotalFark]  

nmrsnr: Ah, placebo effect, what can't it do?


sure, but I can see IPA drying the skin out MORE on top of the chlorine and just being in the water

12 Nov 2012 03:22 PM
kingoomieiii     
hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, tight swimcaps and over-chlorinated water?

12 Nov 2012 03:24 PM
namatad    [TotalFark]  

wambu: Years ago my neighbor put up a 50 foot tower for his ham radio, but broke his hand and was unable to complete the project for several months. During that time, other neighbors filed complaints with the FCC alledging interference with their TVs (no cable back then, it was all OTA). Of course, there was no intereferencem but the neighbors finally got the FCC to send an engineer out who determined that the interference was coming from a 500-watt linear amplifier that the loudest complainier was using with his CB who promptly had all his CB equipment siezed. The compaining guy turned into a total get-off-my-lawn asshat after that and the entire neighborhood was relieved when he moved to a gated community a few years after that. He must have been hell on the HOA.


/CSB!

12 Nov 2012 03:31 PM
namatad    [TotalFark]  

kingoomieiii: hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, tight swimcaps and over-chlorinated water?


and no goggles

12 Nov 2012 03:32 PM
namatad    [TotalFark]  

NowhereMon: ZAZ: How is a product based on isopropyl alcohol not miscible with water?

It also contains 5% of some kind of organic surfactant that probably keeps the IPA from going into solution. The IPA is attracted to the non-polar, hydrophobic end of the surfactant while the polar end points towards the H20. The whole shebang probably forms micelles that float on the top of the pool.


GEEK
and thanks :D

12 Nov 2012 03:33 PM
wambu     

NowhereMon: ZAZ: How is a product based on isopropyl alcohol not miscible with water?

It also contains 5% of some kind of organic surfactant that probably keeps the IPA from going into solution. The IPA is attracted to the non-polar, hydrophobic end of the surfactant while the polar end points towards the H20. The whole shebang probably forms micelles that float on the top of the pool.


Is that the same stuff they use in the "waterless" urinals?

12 Nov 2012 04:30 PM
cretinbob     

wambu: Years ago my neighbor put up a 50 foot tower for his ham radio, but broke his hand and was unable to complete the project for several months. During that time, other neighbors filed complaints with the FCC alledging interference with their TVs (no cable back then, it was all OTA). Of course, there was no intereferencem but the neighbors finally got the FCC to send an engineer out who determined that the interference was coming from a 500-watt linear amplifier that the loudest complainier was using with his CB who promptly had all his CB equipment siezed. The compaining guy turned into a total get-off-my-lawn asshat after that and the entire neighborhood was relieved when he moved to a gated community a few years after that. He must have been hell on the HOA.


i2.kym-cdn.comView Full Size

12 Nov 2012 04:51 PM
Holocaust Agnostic     
But its in the water memory.

12 Nov 2012 05:12 PM
cgraves67     

TheBeastOfYuccaFlats: kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?

The parents were just trying to explain away the fact that their kids are teenagers and have, y'know, farked up bodies as per normal.

Either that or their kids are doing meth.


I was thinking they were doing the swim coach, and maybe caught something.

12 Nov 2012 05:14 PM
TOWG     

kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?


or a little bit of Windex.

12 Nov 2012 05:14 PM
StreetlightInTheGhetto     
Emo Ann Arbor (lgt video).

/that is all I will say about this

12 Nov 2012 05:15 PM
JohnAnnArbor    [TotalFark]  

Holocaust Agnostic: But its in the water memory.


Only if they used 0.000000000000000000000000000000000000 000000000000^A grams of the fluid to begin with.

Any more would destroy the effect.

12 Nov 2012 05:17 PM
Shazam999     

wambu: Years ago my neighbor put up a 50 foot tower for his ham radio, but broke his hand and was unable to complete the project for several months. During that time, other neighbors filed complaints with the FCC alledging interference with their TVs (no cable back then, it was all OTA). Of course, there was no intereferencem but the neighbors finally got the FCC to send an engineer out who determined that the interference was coming from a 500-watt linear amplifier that the loudest complainier was using with his CB who promptly had all his CB equipment siezed. The compaining guy turned into a total get-off-my-lawn asshat after that and the entire neighborhood was relieved when he moved to a gated community a few years after that. He must have been hell on the HOA.


Hell on the HOA? He probably runs it now.

12 Nov 2012 05:17 PM
fredklein     

kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?


"Nausea and eye and skin irritation are fairly common health effects of swimming in chlorinated water. "

12 Nov 2012 05:18 PM
JohnAnnArbor    [TotalFark]  

JohnAnnArbor: Holocaust Agnostic: But its in the water memory.

Only if they used 0.00000000000000000000001 grams of the fluid to begin with.

Any more would destroy the effect.


Not sure where the ^A came from.....

12 Nov 2012 05:18 PM
Fark Reddit or bust     
Ahhhh, Yuppies. Raising their children to think that they're the center of the universe. Never prepared for the cynical world that surrounds them.

12 Nov 2012 05:19 PM
hutchkc     

ZAZ: How is a product based on isopropyl alcohol not miscible with water?


You sir get a cookie. My vocabulary is pretty decent and I've never heard of that miscible.

12 Nov 2012 05:19 PM
iheartscotch     
You know; it's not like they are forcing anybody to use the pool. If the parents are so worried; they can buy their own pool and then they can moniter what goes into the water.

/ or they can quit complaining about it

12 Nov 2012 05:20 PM
Jument     
The symptoms are all standard chlorine reactions/irritations, aren't they? And as to why they haven't experienced them before: kids are changing quickly. What doesn't bother them one year may bother them the next. Also, if they know there's a new chemical in the water, obviously they will be on high alert for "new" symptoms.

Sounds gross though. If it's "like vegetable oil" how does it not stick to your skin and suit and such?

12 Nov 2012 05:20 PM
lennavan     

kingoomieiii: hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, tight swimcaps and over-chlorinated water?


nmrsnr: Ah, placebo effect, what can't it do?


BUT WHAT ABOUT THE CHILDREN?!?!?!

At the meeting, officials revealed one important thing: The Huron pool had been without the liquid pool cover chemical for more than three weeks, the time during which parents reported the excessive skin irritation and other symptoms.

God it must have been awesome to be the official who got to reveal that one. The level of smug that would have given me could have fueled a hybrid car for a year.

12 Nov 2012 05:20 PM
meat0918     
Love that nocebo effect.

Just the very idea it might make you sick, makes some people sick.

See also, people complaining wind turbines make them ill.

One of my aunts is one of those that thinks they make her sick. Nearest one is 13 miles away as the crow flies, and she claims it has caused her all sorts of maladies, including that she can hear it over the nearby cows.

But ask her about how safe nuclear power is, and she'll gush about how awesome it is, and that she worked for one, dontchaknow.

12 Nov 2012 05:23 PM
Satanic_Hamster     

kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?


You quoted the article but didn't read it? The parents were making it up. Newsflash; some parents are paranoid freaks and outright liars.

12 Nov 2012 05:25 PM
Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom     
We had a huge hubbub in town about 6 months ago when a group started making all sorts of allegations, contacting the media, starting blogs, etc... about all these symptoms they were experiencing from WiFi-equipped parking meters. It culminated in a town hall meeting when one of the city engineers testified that the WiFi devices hadn't been installed yet. Whoops!

12 Nov 2012 05:28 PM
gunther_bumpass     

kronicfeld: The parents talked to the school about it in an apparent effort to find out what the cause was. What part of this supposed to be stroking my outrage gland?



Just the tip.

12 Nov 2012 05:28 PM
Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist     
Would the kids be more or less buoyant swimming in that pool? I think swimming through a modified oil slick would help you post faster times.

12 Nov 2012 05:28 PM
lennavan     

Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: Would the kids be more or less buoyant swimming in that pool? I think swimming through a modified oil slick would help you post faster times.


Yet when BP built such a pool in the gulf for people to try out, everyone just biatched.

12 Nov 2012 05:30 PM
Fark Rye For Many Whores     

wambu: Is that the same stuff they use in the "waterless" urinals?


Is that the same stuff William Gibson used in "Idoru"?

12 Nov 2012 05:31 PM
namegoeshere     
As far as the tempoerature, you kids today are pansies. When I was but a wee swim team lass, we practiced in an outdoor, uheated pool. Rain or shine. At seven o'clock in the morning. Which wasn't so bad in August but was downright nippy in June. And in an effort to toughen us up even further, the coaches would dump bags of ice in the water before we jumped in.

And we swam our laps uphill. Both ways. And we were thankful.

12 Nov 2012 05:31 PM
Parthenogenetic     

nmrsnr: Ah, placebo effect, what can't it do?


Actually, nocebo effect.

/pedant

12 Nov 2012 05:31 PM
Hector Remarkable     
But there are positive effects, too. Local dogs are getting smarter, the nation's infrastructure stays secure, and of course, public and private golf courses have been improved 34%.

12 Nov 2012 05:31 PM
Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist     

lennavan: Bashar and Asma's Infinite Playlist: Would the kids be more or less buoyant swimming in that pool? I think swimming through a modified oil slick would help you post faster times.

Yet when BP built such a pool in the gulf for people to try out, everyone just biatched.


Those oil-covered pelicans were just resting after breaking their own personal best laps.

12 Nov 2012 05:32 PM
Nana's Vibrator    [TotalFark]  
While it's possible not using the cover after having used it may have thrown the water into an imbalance, the burning and itchiness is probably a result of on of 2 things:

too little chlorine and not enough filtration or too much chlorine and bad timing (shock it right before practice!) and still not enough filtration

Clean and filter the damn pool!

/also, your daughters are filthy, filthy girls

12 Nov 2012 05:32 PM
jst3p    [TotalFark]  
Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

Uhhh yeah, we haven't been using it for weeks. Your daughters caught V.D.

12 Nov 2012 05:33 PM
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