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   Comforting: Getting a large oil delivery in preparation for winter. Not comforting: Getting a large oil delivery in preparation for winter when your home is all-electric

15 Nov 2012 10:46 AM   |   7250 clicks   |   CBC
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cgraves67     
Yikes. I'm going to guess the driver lost his job on that one.

15 Nov 2012 10:49 AM
Englebert Slaptyback    [TotalFark]  

Terry Phillips had recently bought the house


That stinks. "Hey, you just moved in but now your house is hosed and you have to move AGAIN."

300 litres is about 70 gallons. Yeesh.

15 Nov 2012 10:50 AM
gopher321    [TotalFark]  
SMOOTH MOVE EX-LAX

15 Nov 2012 10:51 AM
rhiannon    [TotalFark]  
Every year...

15 Nov 2012 10:51 AM
FatherChaos     
southparkstudios.mtvnimages.comView Full Size


That's not my oil, buddy!

I'm not your buddy, guy!

I'm not your guy, friend!

I'm not your friend, buddy!

15 Nov 2012 10:52 AM
Walker    [TotalFark]  

rhiannon: Every year...


True dat. And sometimes more than once a year.

15 Nov 2012 10:52 AM
abhorrent1     
Not that I think it's the home owners fault but...If you took the oil tank out of service, don't you think it would be a good idea to cap it or otherwise block off the fill tube?

/don't know how they work
//not living like it's 1899

15 Nov 2012 10:56 AM
buzzcut73     
How hard would it be when doing these conversions to cap off the filler tube and pour a little quickcrete in there to prevent these things. I'm thinking maybe a half hour worth of labor, a partial bag of quickcrete and a pipe cap can't be more than about $50 or so added to the bill.

15 Nov 2012 10:57 AM
The Loaf     
...which is why you always remove the filler tube when you remove an oil tank.

15 Nov 2012 10:57 AM
JackieRabbit     
Whoops. Our bad.

15 Nov 2012 10:58 AM
TheGreatGazoo     
You'd think you'd put a padlock on the filler tube or plug it with expansion foam.

At least the renovations will now be free.

15 Nov 2012 10:59 AM
kvinesknows     
this happens quite a number of times actually.

15 Nov 2012 11:01 AM
Mr. Eugenides     
I bet you that the homeowner was on an oil keep full program and the oil company was just coming out to make the first winter delivery. I was chatting with an oil delivery driver and the company had pumped 300 gallons of #2 into some guy's basement after he switched to gas heat, removed the oil tank but didn't notify the oil company or disable the oil fill spout.

The homeowner sued for the damages but when they went to court and the signed keep fill contract was presented the home owner ended up paying for 300 gallons of oil.

15 Nov 2012 11:01 AM
give me doughnuts     
FTA: The cost of the cleanup and rebuilding of the home is being covered by the oil company's insurance.

Translation: We'll replace your house, so please don't sue us and get awarded twenty times its value.

15 Nov 2012 11:01 AM
catusr    [TotalFark]  
Oh crap. I replaced my oil furnace with a natural gas furnace 20 years ago. The tank was removed, but the filler tube is still there! I'm in PANIC mode. I better stop at the hardware store on the way home. I hope I'm not too late.

15 Nov 2012 11:02 AM
blatz514    [TotalFark]  
Deep Horizon again?

15 Nov 2012 11:02 AM
Maxor     
Hum, not to be evil but this doesn't sound like that bad of a deal for the Home owner. Only one who really looses is the insurance company, but comercial insurance has a tendency to be fairly low risk high profit anyway so, oh well just a tiny bit lower dividend to the shareholders.

15 Nov 2012 11:03 AM
THX 1138     

Mr. Eugenides: I bet you that the homeowner was on an oil keep full program


Considering the article says he recently bought the house, I doubt he had any sort of relationship at all with the delivery company.

15 Nov 2012 11:04 AM
SDRR     
www.homebuilderspueblo.comView Full Size

15 Nov 2012 11:06 AM
YixilTesiphon     
That sucks. Luckily I don't think my house ever had oil heat, though the county thinks it does.

/gas heat
//gas stove
///gas dryer
////gas water heater
//super cheap

15 Nov 2012 11:07 AM
tommyl66     

THX 1138: Mr. Eugenides: I bet you that the previous homeowner was on an oil keep full program and forgot to stop service before selling the house

Considering the article says he recently bought the house, I doubt he had any sort of relationship at all with the delivery company.


Better?

15 Nov 2012 11:09 AM
blatz514    [TotalFark]  

Maxor: Hum, not to be evil but this doesn't sound like that bad of a deal for the Home owner. Only one who really looses is the insurance company, but comercial insurance has a tendency to be fairly low risk high profit anyway so, oh well just a tiny bit lower dividend to the shareholders.


What the hell did I just read?

15 Nov 2012 11:15 AM
kvinesknows     

give me doughnuts: FTA: The cost of the cleanup and rebuilding of the home is being covered by the oil company's insurance.

Translation: We'll replace your house, so please don't sue us and get awarded twenty times its value.


except.

Canada

15 Nov 2012 11:15 AM
akula    [TotalFark]  
For those of you northeast folks, how long does a tank of heating oil last?

Just curious... such things are pretty well unknown here in this area, and I've no experience with such things. I can only imagine running out right when a cold spell hits.

15 Nov 2012 11:17 AM
C0rf     
Wife and I bought a home two years ago that had been renovated to use all electric appliances and HVAC. The electric "furnace" is like a breath of lukewarm air costing $300 monthly to operate when the temperature gets down below freezing, and that's just in Maryland. I'm annoyed at the prospect of ripping out a nearly-new setup to replace it with natural gas if I want effective warmth between November and February...

And this guy was switching TO electrical heat? In Canada?! Brrr.

15 Nov 2012 11:17 AM
spEdmonkEy1603     
FTFA: The delivery driver was at the wrong house.

Clearly stated.

15 Nov 2012 11:23 AM
chevydeuce     
I know nothing of heating oil or how it's stored/used, but I am surprised that the tank was underground...I just assumed they were always in the basement.

15 Nov 2012 11:24 AM
ruta     

tommyl66: THX 1138: Mr. Eugenides: I bet you that the previous homeowner was on an oil keep full program and forgot to stop service before selling the house

Considering the article says he recently bought the house, I doubt he had any sort of relationship at all with the delivery company.

Better?


FTfarkingfirstlineoftheFA: "A home near Victoria had to be demolished after an oil company got its addresses mixed up and delivered a load of furnace oil to the wrong house."

15 Nov 2012 11:24 AM
RTOGUY    [TotalFark]  

akula: For those of you northeast folks, how long does a tank of heating oil last?

Just curious... such things are pretty well unknown here in this area, and I've no experience with such things. I can only imagine running out right when a cold spell hits.


For me about two months but your mileage may vary based on the size of the house/tank and how toasty you want it. Most people on oil have the oil company stop by regularly and top up the tank because you don't want to run out not just because of the obvious cold house problem but the oil lines will freeze and that is all sorts of annoying.

15 Nov 2012 11:26 AM
haterade     
Am I the only one thinking- sweet, free new house!

15 Nov 2012 11:28 AM
akula    [TotalFark]  

C0rf: Wife and I bought a home two years ago that had been renovated to use all electric appliances and HVAC. The electric "furnace" is like a breath of lukewarm air costing $300 monthly to operate when the temperature gets down below freezing, and that's just in Maryland. I'm annoyed at the prospect of ripping out a nearly-new setup to replace it with natural gas if I want effective warmth between November and February...

And this guy was switching TO electrical heat? In Canada?! Brrr.


Our house here in STL had electric heat. Even with great insulation, heating was expensive and not all that comfortable. $300 electric bills in December and January were not unusual at all.

Last year I put in a dual fuel heat pump/gas furnace (95% efficiency) setup and the heating and cooling bills went WAY down. Winter is darn near dirt cheap now- electric bills are under $100 and gas bills no more than $50.

15 Nov 2012 11:36 AM
akula    [TotalFark]  

RTOGUY: akula: For those of you northeast folks, how long does a tank of heating oil last?

Just curious... such things are pretty well unknown here in this area, and I've no experience with such things. I can only imagine running out right when a cold spell hits.

For me about two months but your mileage may vary based on the size of the house/tank and how toasty you want it. Most people on oil have the oil company stop by regularly and top up the tank because you don't want to run out not just because of the obvious cold house problem but the oil lines will freeze and that is all sorts of annoying.


Interesting. I just found it weird to think of having a large tank of oil in the basement. Never having lived in the NE, it's just not part of my experience.

15 Nov 2012 11:36 AM
YixilTesiphon     

C0rf: I'm annoyed at the prospect of ripping out a nearly-new setup to replace it with natural gas if I want effective warmth between November and February...


It will be worth it. While you're at it, get natural gas to your kitchen and laundry room too, and replace those appliances (Sears Outlet is usually excellent.) My utility bills barely exist when I'm not heating or cooling the house, and I only cooled the house this summer (Pennsylvania) because we had a tenant as a favor.

15 Nov 2012 11:39 AM
poughdrew     
I still don't understand why you wouldn't take the time and effort to convert the nozzle so it sprays back out at the guy who is filling it up. Haha, now you're covered in oil, oil guy.

15 Nov 2012 11:40 AM
justanotherfarkinfarker     
This happens from time to time. Around me there was a house that pulled a basement tank but left the filler tube (why you wouldn't cut the tube and fill it is beyond me). Delivery was off by a house. Guy pumped the truck into the basement (apparently he must have been wanking in the truck not to notice several hundred gallons going in.). Didn't total the house though. Who wouldn't want a nice indoor saudi swimming pool.

15 Nov 2012 11:45 AM
YixilTesiphon     

poughdrew: I still don't understand why you wouldn't take the time and effort to convert the nozzle so it sprays back out at the guy who is filling it up. Haha, now you're covered in oil, oil guy.


You can go to jail for purposefully spilling oil.

15 Nov 2012 11:46 AM
Mentalpatient87     
Too much trouble for the driver to maybe knock on the door and check in?

15 Nov 2012 11:52 AM
SultanofSchwing     

C0rf: Wife and I bought a home two years ago that had been renovated to use all electric appliances and HVAC. The electric "furnace" is like a breath of lukewarm air costing $300 monthly to operate when the temperature gets down below freezing, and that's just in Maryland. I'm annoyed at the prospect of ripping out a nearly-new setup to replace it with natural gas if I want effective warmth between November and February...

And this guy was switching TO electrical heat? In Canada?! Brrr.


to be fair it's Victoria, which barely dips below 40 in the middle of winter unless it's something crazy going on.

15 Nov 2012 11:53 AM
poughdrew     

YixilTesiphon: poughdrew: I still don't understand why you wouldn't take the time and effort to convert the nozzle so it sprays back out at the guy who is filling it up. Haha, now you're covered in oil, oil guy.

You can go to jail for purposefully spilling oil.


So we'll expect to see this driver or company owner in jail any day now?

15 Nov 2012 11:54 AM
akula    [TotalFark]  

YixilTesiphon: C0rf: I'm annoyed at the prospect of ripping out a nearly-new setup to replace it with natural gas if I want effective warmth between November and February...

It will be worth it. While you're at it, get natural gas to your kitchen and laundry room too, and replace those appliances (Sears Outlet is usually excellent.) My utility bills barely exist when I'm not heating or cooling the house, and I only cooled the house this summer (Pennsylvania) because we had a tenant as a favor.


Use a tankless water heater and the savings just rack up. It's nice not paying to heat water you don't need to use for a few hours, and once you do, it's only getting colder from that point on.

15 Nov 2012 11:55 AM
THX 1138     

C0rf: And this guy was switching TO electrical heat? In Canada?! Brrr


It's Victoria, British Columbia. If the temperature gets down to the freezing point even once in a year, it's unusual.

15 Nov 2012 12:10 PM
Albert911emt     

Mr. Eugenides: I bet you that the homeowner was on an oil keep full program and the oil company was just coming out to make the first winter delivery. I was chatting with an oil delivery driver and the company had pumped 300 gallons of #2 into some guy's basement after he switched to gas heat, removed the oil tank but didn't notify the oil company or disable the oil fill spout.

The homeowner sued for the damages but when they went to court and the signed keep fill contract was presented the home owner ended up paying for 300 gallons of oil.


It's be easier if you just read the article next time.

15 Nov 2012 12:15 PM
Wodan11     
You folks peddling natural gas may be mistaken. NYT article

Plus, some are claiming the US will surpass both Saudi Arabia and Russia by 2017 to be the world's largest oil producer, and exporting (not importing) oil.
Financial Times article 

Anyway yes I have an oil furnace, but one tank lasts all year (we mostly use the wood stove).

15 Nov 2012 12:24 PM
Skirl Hutsenreiter     

akula: YixilTesiphon: C0rf: I'm annoyed at the prospect of ripping out a nearly-new setup to replace it with natural gas if I want effective warmth between November and February...

It will be worth it. While you're at it, get natural gas to your kitchen and laundry room too, and replace those appliances (Sears Outlet is usually excellent.) My utility bills barely exist when I'm not heating or cooling the house, and I only cooled the house this summer (Pennsylvania) because we had a tenant as a favor.

Use a tankless water heater and the savings just rack up. It's nice not paying to heat water you don't need to use for a few hours, and once you do, it's only getting colder from that point on.


I have hot water heat and dream of getting one of those boiler/water heater combined units. The boiler water pipes loop around your hot water tank so it's nice and efficient.

15 Nov 2012 12:36 PM
akula    [TotalFark]  

Wodan11: You folks peddling natural gas may be mistaken. NYT article

Plus, some are claiming the US will surpass both Saudi Arabia and Russia by 2017 to be the world's largest oil producer, and exporting (not importing) oil.
Financial Times article 

Anyway yes I have an oil furnace, but one tank lasts all year (we mostly use the wood stove).


I'm personally a bigger fan of natural gas for home heating and using heavier petroleum products (gasoline, diesel) for transportation. The heavier fuels package better... getting the same energy worth of natural gas in a vehicle is a real problem by comparison.

15 Nov 2012 12:37 PM
Captain Horatio Mindblower     
buzzcut73
How hard would it be when doing these conversions to cap off the filler tube and pour a little quickcrete in there to prevent these things. I'm thinking maybe a half hour worth of labor, a partial bag of quickcrete and a pipe cap can't be more than about $50 or so added to the bill.

The Loaf
...which is why you always remove the filler tube when you remove an oil tank.

Our house was converted from oil to gas heat at some point before we bought it. They didn't bother removing the oil tank, or even emptying it, but they did cut the filler tube and fill the stub with concrete. As others have pointed out, it's a quick and cheap operation that can save you a house.

I know it's bad form to blame the victim, but . . .

15 Nov 2012 12:42 PM
talkertopc     

C0rf: Wife and I bought a home two years ago that had been renovated to use all electric appliances and HVAC. The electric "furnace" is like a breath of lukewarm air costing $300 monthly to operate when the temperature gets down below freezing, and that's just in Maryland. I'm annoyed at the prospect of ripping out a nearly-new setup to replace it with natural gas if I want effective warmth between November and February...

And this guy was switching TO electrical heat? In Canada?! Brrr.


Electricity is a very efficient way of heating a house when the equipment is installed right and the house is properly insulated. A winter without a week at -40 is abnormal here (or was abnormal until a few years ago) and most houses here are both heated by electricity and comfortable in winter. If you live in a place where they use oil or coal to generate electricity then it might make more sense to use oil directly to heat you home to save on cost but electricity can heat a home easily as well (or better) than oil.

15 Nov 2012 12:49 PM
Oreamnos     

talkertopc: C0rf: Wife and I bought a home two years ago that had been renovated to use all electric appliances and HVAC. The electric "furnace" is like a breath of lukewarm air costing $300 monthly to operate when the temperature gets down below freezing, and that's just in Maryland. I'm annoyed at the prospect of ripping out a nearly-new setup to replace it with natural gas if I want effective warmth between November and February...

And this guy was switching TO electrical heat? In Canada?! Brrr.

Electricity is a very efficient way of heating a house when the equipment is installed right and the house is properly insulated. A winter without a week at -40 is abnormal here (or was abnormal until a few years ago) and most houses here are both heated by electricity and comfortable in winter. If you live in a place where they use oil or coal to generate electricity then it might make more sense to use oil directly to heat you home to save on cost but electricity can heat a home easily as well (or better) than oil.


Elaborate on this thought. The only way I can see electric heat possibly being better than natural gas is if you mean that you can conceivably heat only the room you're actually in, whereas most other central systems can't be this focused.
Agree that proper insulation and weather sealing is paramount regardless of system type/energy source.

15 Nov 2012 01:22 PM
jfivealive     

akula: For those of you northeast folks, how long does a tank of heating oil last?

Just curious... such things are pretty well unknown here in this area, and I've no experience with such things. I can only imagine running out right when a cold spell hits.


Go through about 100, maybe 125 gallons of heating oil a month. I live in a relatively small raised ranch house, 3 bedrooms, 1500 square feet. The oil tank is right in the basement, holds 290 gallons. At $3.75 a gallon, it is a bit pricey, upwards of $500 a month if its very very cold.

Running out isn't that big of a deal, as long as you get it filled within a day or so. Only pain in the ass is the line from the tank to the furnace is now filled with air, so you gotta bleed it, just like a brake line. The furnace will keep faulting while you do it since there's no oil (or not enough oil) coming through to light, so you gotta keep hitting the reset button. Oh and you need to make sure the bleed line is waaaay open, cause you don't want partial oil being sprayed into your furnace. It will line the sides, and then when you do get enough air out of the lines for it to spark, it could go potentially flare up inside the furnace, maybe even go boom!

15 Nov 2012 01:49 PM
akula    [TotalFark]  

jfivealive: akula: For those of you northeast folks, how long does a tank of heating oil last?

Just curious... such things are pretty well unknown here in this area, and I've no experience with such things. I can only imagine running out right when a cold spell hits.

Go through about 100, maybe 125 gallons of heating oil a month. I live in a relatively small raised ranch house, 3 bedrooms, 1500 square feet. The oil tank is right in the basement, holds 290 gallons. At $3.75 a gallon, it is a bit pricey, upwards of $500 a month if its very very cold.

Running out isn't that big of a deal, as long as you get it filled within a day or so. Only pain in the ass is the line from the tank to the furnace is now filled with air, so you gotta bleed it, just like a brake line. The furnace will keep faulting while you do it since there's no oil (or not enough oil) coming through to light, so you gotta keep hitting the reset button. Oh and you need to make sure the bleed line is waaaay open, cause you don't want partial oil being sprayed into your furnace. It will line the sides, and then when you do get enough air out of the lines for it to spark, it could go potentially flare up inside the furnace, maybe even go boom!


Wow, expensive AND a pain in the rear. Can't say I envy you all using the heating oil.

15 Nov 2012 02:14 PM
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