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   Thirteen hidden colleges expenses. Fourteen would have been beer, but no one wants to admit it

16 Nov 2012 11:52 AM   |   9902 clicks   |   Time
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ZAZ    [TotalFark]  
I never paid for beer in college. Some was bought with hall funds, but the hall tax was fixed. If it hadn't gone to beer it would have gone to fruit or something silly. Having beer didn't cost me. Drinking age was 21 so I couldn't have spent money on beer directly. Nobody cared about underage drinking, so hall parties had beer.

16 Nov 2012 10:40 AM
DammitIForgotMyLogin    [TotalFark]  
Since when is beer a hidden college expense?

16 Nov 2012 10:45 AM
FishyFred     

DammitIForgotMyLogin: Since when is beer a hidden college expense?


If you're living on a dry campus...

16 Nov 2012 11:15 AM
Relatively Obscure    [TotalFark]  
Thirteen hidden colleges expenses. Fourteen would have been beer, but no one wants to admit it

This must be fancy college writin'.

16 Nov 2012 11:28 AM
LowbrowDeluxe     
Hidden colleges? Do they have Unseen Deans?

16 Nov 2012 11:53 AM
DarwiOdrade    [TotalFark]  

DammitIForgotMyLogin: Since when is beer a hidden college expense?


Since when are books and lab fees a hidden college expense?

16 Nov 2012 11:54 AM
Pair-o-Dice     
Hookers and blow strangely absent from the list.

16 Nov 2012 11:56 AM
LouDobbsAwaaaay     
Apparently college students aren't aware that books, supplies, parking, entertainment, fraternities/sororities, memberships, furnishings, electronics, cable TV, clothes, cell phones, food, beverages, and travel cost money. No wonder I always see banks setting up tables on the main campus drag every semester, suckering students into credit cards with insane penalties and fees attached. They're all idiots.

16 Nov 2012 11:57 AM
HotIgneous Intruder     
And don't forget about birth control and abortions!
Derp, derp.

16 Nov 2012 11:58 AM
curtis_e_bare     
Hold on, you need books for these college courses? Shirley, theses books are free.

16 Nov 2012 11:59 AM
majestic     
What a stupid farking article. I wish it were hidden.

16 Nov 2012 12:03 PM
Prey4reign    [TotalFark]  
As identified by the article:

Books and media,
Class and parking fees,
Having fun,
Fraternities and Sororities,
Getting involved,
Furnishings,
Electronics,
Cable TV,
Wardrobe,
Food and beverage costs, and
Travel costs


Drugs, bail and abortions suspiciously missing from the list.

16 Nov 2012 12:05 PM
Jim_Callahan    [TotalFark]  
tuition and fees accounts for only 38 percent of the total student expense budget for in-state students enrolled in public four-year institutions.

In-state tuition is on the order of 5-6k$ for a 9-month semester. In an urban area, rent will run you easily 500-700$ a month, i.e. 4.5k$ to 6.3k$ for the non-summer period.

Article proceeds on the assumption that the 200$-300$ yearly spent on parking and clubs are a significant hidden cost to someone that has to come up with 12k$ a year. Riiiiiiiiight.

16 Nov 2012 12:09 PM
D3_WR     
Books and media: According to The College Board, the average annual cost of books for a college student ranges from $850-1000. This is one item you shouldn't skimp on. To save money, buy used textbooks (even cheaper used books can be found online vs. in the bookstore) or use library resources. If books cost more than you expected, revise the "textbook" budget for future semesters accordingly.



What a bunch of bullshiat! Who the fark pays 1000 bucks in textbooks per year? The only way to approach that is if you bought new versions from the university bookstore, and had 4 science classes per semester that all had $150 textbooks. This is one item you SHOULD skimp on. Share with a friend, use the library, buy online, or half the time, don't even bother to buy a book, since they often aren't even really required

16 Nov 2012 12:14 PM
LarryDan43     
Abortions.

16 Nov 2012 12:15 PM
Jon iz teh kewl     
15. marihuana

16 Nov 2012 12:16 PM
justneal     
yeah, no one ever knew they had to buy books

16 Nov 2012 12:18 PM
endmile     

Jim_Callahan: tuition and fees accounts for only 38 percent of the total student expense budget for in-state students enrolled in public four-year institutions.

In-state tuition is on the order of 5-6k$ for a 9-month semester. In an urban area, rent will run you easily 500-700$ a month, i.e. 4.5k$ to 6.3k$ for the non-summer period.

Article proceeds on the assumption that the 200$-300$ yearly spent on parking and clubs are a significant hidden cost to someone that has to come up with 12k$ a year. Riiiiiiiiight.


That depends on the college. Many are in financial trouble, and they are finding new ways to make up revenue without raising tuition. I know of a couple of universities whose parking fees are approaching $1000/yr. That's not chump change to most people, I would guess.

16 Nov 2012 12:20 PM
mcwehrle     
There isn't one thing on that list that should be a surprise to anyone. If there is, well, perhaps college isn't for you. waste of time and $$, etc.

16 Nov 2012 12:22 PM
december     
14. Retaking classes.

I teach at a university where students can retake classes as many times as they like to try to improve the grade. Many students take this as an invitation to blow off the class the 1st time around, see what grade they get, then decide whether to take it again.

As a money making scheme it's brilliant: you get lazy students to pay twice. As a prof it's annoying because as soon as grades are posted you get a rash of students emailing to find out if the assignments will be the same next time the class is offered.

16 Nov 2012 12:25 PM
I May Be Crazy But...     
Apparently some folks don't know the difference between necessities and luxuries.

16 Nov 2012 12:25 PM
rbt     
I know of a couple of universities whose parking fees are approaching $1000/yr.

Surface lots around strip malls here in Toronto cost about $80/month/spot to build and maintain a paved lot. That includes land cost, snow clearing, repaving once a decade, etc. Charging less than $960/year in this city would be a subsidy to drivers, penalizing those who take other modes or live on campus.

Multi-level parking garage costs are quite a bit higher due to the added capital for building the lot.

16 Nov 2012 12:29 PM
WordyGrrl     

D3_WR: Books and media: According to The College Board, the average annual cost of books for a college student ranges from $850-1000. This is one item you shouldn't skimp on. To save money, buy used textbooks (even cheaper used books can be found online vs. in the bookstore) or use library resources. If books cost more than you expected, revise the "textbook" budget for future semesters accordingly.



What a bunch of bullshiat! Who the fark pays 1000 bucks in textbooks per year? The only way to approach that is if you bought new versions from the university bookstore, and had 4 science classes per semester that all had $150 textbooks. This is one item you SHOULD skimp on. Share with a friend, use the library, buy online, or half the time, don't even bother to buy a book, since they often aren't even really required


If you're going fulltime (4 classes per semester, 3 semesters a year), $1,000 won't begin to cover it. Especially when you have some courses that require lab and lecture (with at least one book for each lab, one for lecture). I had a geology class in which the books were $375 new, and the going rate for used (purchased from previous students) was $200. And most of the time, you do have to buy the book because the test material's from the book -- not from the lecture alone. Textbooks are a ripoff for students and a moneymaker for the school.

As for the rest of those "hidden charges," most of that spending on fashion, fun and electronics was trendy "lifestyle" crap not necessary for the achievement of a degree.

16 Nov 2012 12:53 PM
JackieRabbit     
I fail to see how any of these are "hidden". Most are expense of daily living. Some are unnecessary and easily avoided.

16 Nov 2012 12:57 PM
uberaverage     
If those costs are "hidden" to you, you may not be college material.

16 Nov 2012 01:04 PM
I May Be Crazy But...     

december: 14. Retaking classes.

I teach at a university where students can retake classes as many times as they like to try to improve the grade. Many students take this as an invitation to blow off the class the 1st time around, see what grade they get, then decide whether to take it again.

As a money making scheme it's brilliant: you get lazy students to pay twice. As a prof it's annoying because as soon as grades are posted you get a rash of students emailing to find out if the assignments will be the same next time the class is offered.


CSB:
When I was in grad school, one of the courses you that everyone had to take at first was taught over and over by one professor, and he gave the same homework every year. (It's really well done, so he reuses it.) I had loaned my notes out after I took it, and apparently my homework was there as well. So a few years later I'm grading for that class and see a homework where every part I say to myself "That how I would do that!" I went and asked the guy whose work it was and he shows me an old homework of mine and says, "Oh, I mostly followed this." Apparently the fact that my name was at the top of the page was a minor detail that had escaped him.

16 Nov 2012 01:40 PM
Vector R     
15. Parking ticket fees

/Now THAT is a hidden fee

16 Nov 2012 01:44 PM
JonZoidberg     

december: 14. Retaking classes.

I teach at a university where students can retake classes as many times as they like to try to improve the grade. Many students take this as an invitation to blow off the class the 1st time around, see what grade they get, then decide whether to take it again.

As a money making scheme it's brilliant: you get lazy students to pay twice. As a prof it's annoying because as soon as grades are posted you get a rash of students emailing to find out if the assignments will be the same next time the class is offered.


I was told that federal loans will no longer pay for retaking a class a third time to improve your grade. They did say, however, that if you failed it twice and are retaking a third time, the loans will cover it. I can't comprehend taking a class 3 times, much less 2, when having passed it already; and I think that if you fail it twice you should change your major or take some time off to get your priorities straight instead of trying it yet again.

16 Nov 2012 02:00 PM
JonZoidberg     

JackieRabbit: I fail to see how any of these are "hidden". Most are expense of daily living. Some are unnecessary and easily avoided.


Totally agreed. Transportation? "I guess they might come visit at some point..." Books? Yeah, you might need a book or two. Buy the previous edition or international edition if available, or even better, the international previous edition. For my Genetics class, most of the group paid $125 for the brand new 9th ed; I paid $8 for the international 8th edition and got invited to be the tutor for the class after acing it so well. I hope the supreme court doesn't quash our ability to legally reimport books that undercut the excessive prices at the bookstore, but in a few months it's no longer my problem, whee!

/After a year or so at work, I go back for my doctorate, whee.....

16 Nov 2012 02:05 PM
blatz514    [TotalFark]  
Condoms

16 Nov 2012 02:06 PM
LiberalEastCoastElitist     
Books and media - Do not buy books if you can possibly get away with it. Borrow someone else's book and photocopy the assignment pages and buy an older edition from ebay. Either it's something like philosophy, which does not change, or it's something like science, which does change, inevitably resulting in a $200 brick in 5 years. 100% chance it will wind up resold (for much less money) or in a garbage can. Nobody has use for a 15 year old biochem text.
Class and parking fees - Use the freaking catalog and figure it out
Having fun - Get a job
Fraternities and Sororities - Get a job
Getting involved - Get a job
Furnishings - Hand me downs
Electronics - Get a job
Cable TV - Go study!
Wardrobe - Get a job
Mobile phone service - Get a job
Food and beverage costs - Pack a sammich
Travel costs - Ok, I'd pay for a semester abroad

/I remind myself of my parents right now

16 Nov 2012 02:30 PM
FizixJunkee     

JonZoidberg:

I was told that federal loans will no longer pay for retaking a class a third time to improve your grade. They did say, however, that if you failed it twice and are retaking a third time, the loans will cover it. I can't comprehend taking a class 3 times, much less 2, when having passed it already; and I think that if you fail it twice you should change your major or take some time off to get your priorities straight instead of trying it yet again.


And federal loans or Pell grants shouldn't be used to cover the cost of remedial courses, either.

16 Nov 2012 02:31 PM
FizixJunkee     
Am I the only one here who kept all my undergrad math and physics texts (plus all those recommended, but not required, physics books)?

16 Nov 2012 02:33 PM
I May Be Crazy But...     

LiberalEastCoastElitist: Books and media - Do not buy books if you can possibly get away with it. Borrow someone else's book and photocopy the assignment pages and buy an older edition from ebay. Either it's something like philosophy, which does not change, or it's something like science, which does change, inevitably resulting in a $200 brick in 5 years. 100% chance it will wind up resold (for much less money) or in a garbage can. Nobody has use for a 15 year old biochem text.
Class and parking fees - Use the freaking catalog and figure it out
Having fun - Get a job
Fraternities and Sororities - Get a job
Getting involved - Get a job
Furnishings - Hand me downs
Electronics - Get a job
Cable TV - Go study!
Wardrobe - Get a job
Mobile phone service - Get a job
Food and beverage costs - Pack a sammich
Travel costs - Ok, I'd pay for a semester abroad

/I remind myself of my parents right now


Replace "Get a job" with "Why do you need that?" and you're channeling my father.

16 Nov 2012 02:46 PM
Jument     
I was legally able to drink the day I arrived on campus. Beer was not a hidden expense!

16 Nov 2012 03:05 PM
JackieRabbit     

JonZoidberg: JackieRabbit: I fail to see how any of these are "hidden". Most are expense of daily living. Some are unnecessary and easily avoided.

Totally agreed. Transportation? "I guess they might come visit at some point..." Books? Yeah, you might need a book or two. Buy the previous edition or international edition if available, or even better, the international previous edition. For my Genetics class, most of the group paid $125 for the brand new 9th ed; I paid $8 for the international 8th edition and got invited to be the tutor for the class after acing it so well. I hope the supreme court doesn't quash our ability to legally reimport books that undercut the excessive prices at the bookstore, but in a few months it's no longer my problem, whee!

/After a year or so at work, I go back for my doctorate, whee.....


I had a friend in college, who was a major stoner. This guy was always baked. To look at him, you'd think this loser will never finish college. But he was a true genius, with an astoundingly high IQ (in the 190s, I forget the exact number). He never bought text books and only rarely went to glass (except to take exams). The school put all required texts on reserve in the library. So at the start of each semester, he'd go to the library, pull the texts for the course he was taking and speed read them on the spot. He studied biochemistry and graduated magna cum laude with a perfect 4.0 average - no. one in our class. His father was a physician and wanted him to follow in his footsteps. He wasn't so interested, but he got stoned and went to take his MCAT exam. He aced it, with a perfect score. He was getting invitations from Yale, Harvard, Columbia, Cornell, Vanderbilt, Duke, Tulane.... to study medicine. He said he wanted to take a year to tool around Europe (mostly Amsterdam, I imagine) before making up his mind. I lost touch with him and never learned of his decision.

16 Nov 2012 03:22 PM
quietwalker     
I had either 2 or 3 jobs throughout all of college, to pay for college, until I joined a fraternity.

Cheaper room and board, ended up running the kitchen for 2.5 years and got paid to do so (and got 3 squares a day besides). Most folks in the house had taken the same classes I was going to take, so used textbooks were just handed over for free. Often with completed homeworks, practice tests, etc. It was walking distance from my classes too, so I didn't have to worry about a long walk/bus/car & parking.

As far as costs go, it cut mine by around half. I had tuition, a few hundred dollars a semester for room and board, and that's it.

If you're heading to college I'd suggest doing the math for fraternities and sororities. Besides the other potential advantages they offer, the all seem to have incredible purely financial benefits.

16 Nov 2012 03:42 PM
maram500     
Watch as I go through this list, having not only lived in a dorm during my undergraduate years but as a master's student too:

1. Books and Media: Not a hidden fee. It's college, so yeah your classes will require these things called "books."
2. Class and Parking Fees: You have a car. On campus there are signs that say something along the lines of "student parking only." How will the campus traffic matrons determine who is a student? With a sticker (usually) that you pay for every semester/year/whatever.
3. Having Fun: Holy shiat, you mean I have to pay to go to a concert or drink with my new-found friends? [Grasp pearls and collapse.]
4. Frats/Sororities: Now hold your ass there for a second. I have to pay people to be my asinine and all-too-often shiatfaced friends? I have to pay to put on my job application that I was a member of Tau Zeta Upsilon, the nation's "best" fraternity with a death by alcohol rate of only 40% per year? (TL;DR? That you have to pay for friends isn't a hidden fee, it's a stupid tax.)
5. Getting Involved: (No snark here. I got involved a lot, and I rarely had to contribute financially. What college are we talking about?)
6. Furnishings: Dorms. Are. shiatholes. Most come with a bed, a desk, and a closet--if you're lucky. Having to buy a decent chair, a coffee maker, and other stuff is "No shiat Sherlock" material.
7. Electronics: How the fark is this a hidden fee? When you receive your acceptance letter, there ought to be a paragraph that states explicitly "You will need to bring a computer of your own."
8. Cable TV: If there is a [reputable] college that doesn't have at least basic cable (Ch 1-100) in the dorms already, I'm not aware of it. So while not a hidden fee, it isn't even a fee. And even if you don't have cable, there's the internet.
9. Wardrobe: It's college, and with college come certain activities. You're an adult now, so maybe you should have, I don't know, some adult clothing...?
10. Mobile Phone Service: No. We live in an age where junior high school students have iPhones, so this falls under "everyday life," not "oh my god, I didn't think I'd need that at college."
11. Food and Beverage Costs: If you're in a dorm, the cafeteria blows. So yes, you're going to need to buy food.
12. Travel Costs: Going home costs money. Who would have ever thought of that?
13. There is no thirteen. Duke sucks, and so does Time.

16 Nov 2012 05:39 PM
maram500     

I May Be Crazy But...: When I was in grad school, one of the courses you that everyone had to take at first was taught over and over by one professor, and he gave the same homework every year. (It's really well done, so he reuses it.) I had loaned my notes out after I took it, and apparently my homework was there as well. So a few years later I'm grading for that class and see a homework where every part I say to myself "That how I would do that!" I went and asked the guy whose work it was and he shows me an old homework of mine and says, "Oh, I mostly followed this." Apparently the fact that my name was at the top of the page was a minor detail that had escaped him.


I had to write a review for a book on the Civil War (history grad student), so like every other review I looked up reviews online and more or less followed what was already said. Except on this particular book I only found one review...by the professor who had assigned the book. Essentially copied her review and got an A.

16 Nov 2012 05:44 PM
Hermit Tard     

curtis_e_bare: Hold on, you need books for these college courses? Shirley, theses books are free.


justneal: yeah, no one ever knew they had to buy books


You don't need to buy books...that is what the library is for.

Once I figured out that for me, studying at the library was much more productive then studying anywhere else, I also found that all the required textbooks were also there. It also saved me having to lug around 30kgs of textbook.

Unfortunately I didn't figure this out until later on. I could have saved myself close to $1000.

17 Nov 2012 12:32 AM
vice_magnet     

D3_WR: Books and media: According to The College Board, the average annual cost of books for a college student ranges from $850-1000. This is one item you shouldn't skimp on. To save money, buy used textbooks (even cheaper used books can be found online vs. in the bookstore) or use library resources. If books cost more than you expected, revise the "textbook" budget for future semesters accordingly.



What a bunch of bullshiat! Who the fark pays 1000 bucks in textbooks per year? The only way to approach that is if you bought new versions from the university bookstore, and had 4 science classes per semester that all had $150 textbooks. This is one item you SHOULD skimp on. Share with a friend, use the library, buy online, or half the time, don't even bother to buy a book, since they often aren't even really required


Over 2,500 colleges rent books. Some providers, like Neebo, Rafter and Campus Book Renter provide this through the college's bookstore. You would have thought the writer could do even 5 minutes' research.

Some nursing programs require $600+ packages with over half the content available only online. That's how the publishers get their pound of flesh.

17 Nov 2012 12:48 AM
Lunakki     

rbt: I know of a couple of universities whose parking fees are approaching $1000/yr.

Surface lots around strip malls here in Toronto cost about $80/month/spot to build and maintain a paved lot. That includes land cost, snow clearing, repaving once a decade, etc. Charging less than $960/year in this city would be a subsidy to drivers, penalizing those who take other modes or live on campus.

Multi-level parking garage costs are quite a bit higher due to the added capital for building the lot.


Because only one person uses a spot per month, right? If you charge me $1000 a year for a parking spot, it better have my damn name on it.

17 Nov 2012 04:38 AM
ZAZ    [TotalFark]  
Because only one person uses a spot per month, right?

The standard use of a spot is one employee or other commuter during the daytime and empty most of the night. Capacity is driven by the number of long term day parkers to be accomodated. Adjust by 10-20% for work from home, vacation, car in the shop, etc. In this way office buildings are different from malls where daily turnover is high.

If you're important, president's office or top professor, you may get a reserved spot 9-5. Ordinary college employees get hunting licenses rather than parking spot licenses. They have the right to go looking for a space on campus.

17 Nov 2012 08:26 AM
Secret Polish Boyfriend     

JonZoidberg: december: 14. Retaking classes.

I teach at a university where students can retake classes as many times as they like to try to improve the grade. Many students take this as an invitation to blow off the class the 1st time around, see what grade they get, then decide whether to take it again...

I was told that federal loans will no longer pay for retaking a class a third time to improve your grade. They did say, however, that if you failed it twice and are retaking a third time, the loans will cover it. I can't comprehend taking a class 3 times, much less 2, when having passed it already; and I think that if you fail it twice you should change your major or take some time off to get your priorities straight instead of trying it yet again.


Schools have some control over this and are using it to reward academically successful students. If your grades are good, you will likely get better financial aid. On the second part, I had a student who was taking calculus for the eighth time. Complex situation, but all I could do was advise him: don't fail calculus again.

17 Nov 2012 08:34 AM
Secret Polish Boyfriend     

FizixJunkee:
And federal loans or Pell grants shouldn't be used to cover the cost of remedial courses, either.


Students with from low-quality high schools (who are usually the poorest students) have to take remedial classes. Many are excellent students who went to high schools too poor to hire, e.g., qualified math teachers. I have also seen high schools offer electives like anthropology while failing to provide students with the three Rs. I would say that on average my students are repeating at least one HS math class (that they have already taken) due to low placement scores. Finally, high schools in my state offer a class called "discrete math", and I don't know what the fark they teach, but it's not discrete math.

We work hard not to penalize bright students for inferior preparation; it's rarely their own faults and we can fix it easily.

17 Nov 2012 08:42 AM
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