(full site)
Fark.com

Try out our new mobile site!


Back To Main
   A grocery store employee either saved a woman from falling for a scam, or left her grandson to die a slow painful death in the Philippines. One of the two

16 Nov 2012 07:15 PM   |   15905 clicks   |   The Consumerist
Showing 1-50 of 116 comments
Refresh Page 2
View Comments:
SurfaceTension    [TotalFark]  
My grandma fell for this same scam a few years ago. Felt awful because it was me they were impersonating.

16 Nov 2012 04:58 PM
SphericalTime    [TotalFark]  
Probably the former.

16 Nov 2012 05:35 PM
gopher321    [TotalFark]  
Elderly - walking ATMs.

16 Nov 2012 05:44 PM
xynix    [TotalFark]  

gopher321: Elderly - walking ATMs.


Sad how naive they are. My grandfather talks about shiat like this all the time and I shoot him down time and again. He also calls KFC a "chicken restaurant." They're living in different versions of reality.

16 Nov 2012 06:20 PM
beantowndog     

SurfaceTension: My grandma fell for this same scam a few years ago. Felt awful because it was me they were impersonating.


What did you do with the money?

16 Nov 2012 06:50 PM
wambu     
You can always get more grandchildren, so meh.

16 Nov 2012 07:09 PM
SurfaceTension    [TotalFark]  

beantowndog: SurfaceTension: My grandma fell for this same scam a few years ago. Felt awful because it was me they were impersonating.

What did you do with the money?


Hookers and blow, of course. Duh!

16 Nov 2012 07:10 PM
Indubitably     
To be real?

Everyone knows the difference, btw.

16 Nov 2012 07:17 PM
tillerman35     
Dammit, I've been waiting for that money order for WEEKS.

16 Nov 2012 07:21 PM
Britney Spear's Speculum     
My parents/aunts/uncles have told my grandparents to never believe anything like this unless they are told by them.

16 Nov 2012 07:21 PM
nimeye     
I wonder what her phone number is? I recently came into a large some of money and I need some help getting it out of my native country.

16 Nov 2012 07:23 PM
crabsno termites     
I know that t was a scam

I'm her oldest grandson, and I'm right here in the States. I was in an accident, though, but I need $2,500. Grams?

16 Nov 2012 07:24 PM
umad     
I hope old people are stupid because they grew up before the internet and not because they are old. I'm not looking forward to retirement if it is the latter.

16 Nov 2012 07:25 PM
Indubitably     

SurfaceTension: beantowndog: SurfaceTension: My grandma fell for this same scam a few years ago. Felt awful because it was me they were impersonating.

What did you do with the money?

Hookers and blow, of course. Duh!


Way to mimic; that doesn't absolve you of anything, btw.

Buy that: lead, please, first. Hunt second.

16 Nov 2012 07:25 PM
BolloxReader     
They should be sending out search parties to scour the Philippines and arrest the arsehole for accessory to murder.

16 Nov 2012 07:28 PM
Frozboz     
Then there's people like me who take it a step farther and bait scammers into creating wooden and bronze AT-ATs:
i63.photobucket.comView Full Size
 

Link

16 Nov 2012 07:29 PM
Gyrfalcon    [TotalFark]  
Tomorrow's headline: 37-year old man found shot to death in Subic Bay; kidnappers had demanded mere $1500-ransom from Florida Grandma.

16 Nov 2012 07:30 PM
ShawnDoc     
I wish it had been that easy to scam money out of my elderly relatives.

16 Nov 2012 07:32 PM
Indubitably     

Indubitably: SurfaceTension: beantowndog: SurfaceTension: My grandma fell for this same scam a few years ago. Felt awful because it was me they were impersonating.

What did you do with the money?

Hookers and blow, of course. Duh!

Way to mimic; that doesn't absolve you of anything, btw.

Buy that: lead, please, first. Hunt second.


A is first but second-plus to E.

Fifth letter and prime.

E's first, suddenly, and leading by example: embrace me; listen to me. Your business will be wiser for it.

You're welcome.

16 Nov 2012 07:32 PM
Indubitably     

Gyrfalcon: Tomorrow's headline: 37-year old man found shot to death in Subic Bay; kidnappers had demanded mere $1500-ransom from Florida Grandma.


Inward.

16 Nov 2012 07:34 PM
taurusowner     
I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?

16 Nov 2012 07:35 PM
Indubitably     

taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?


I skimmed your entry and decided: you r rtrded. *)

16 Nov 2012 07:38 PM
Herb Utsmelz    [TotalFark]  
I saw grocery store, woman and falling and I instantly thought of this.

imgboot.comView Full Size

16 Nov 2012 07:38 PM
mhuckins     

SurfaceTension: My grandma fell for this same scam a few years ago. Felt awful because it was me they were impersonating.


My dreams are now haunted.

16 Nov 2012 07:41 PM
Lunaville     
My father is mean and I can't remember ever liking him, but he did one thing I highly approve of. Many years ago, a young man went to my maternal grandmother and told her one of my sisters' was involved in some emergency. She gave him cash to take to my sister and he spent it on drugs. My father went to his domicile, kicked the door in, picked Mr.Druggie up by his throat and shook him like a rag doll. Mr. Druggie stayed the heck away from my grandmother after that.

(sniff) Dad, why couldn't you always be so reasonable?

16 Nov 2012 07:41 PM
Bossk'sSegway     
I'd say wait a week and have the grandson call again, but knowing the health care in the philippines he'd probably be dead of pneumonia.

Pay as you go.

16 Nov 2012 07:48 PM
ModernLuddite     

taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?


I think it's one of two things:

1) You start stupid, and stay stupid. There are young people who just can't do certain things and refuse to learn or try to do it.....it's just a complete block people have on learning things. They say things like "I don't read".

2) A lot of people believe that you get infirm as you age, and talk themselves into it. My mother works at a retirement home, and says she sees it all the time - people who are perfectly healthy, and relatively young, who are just crippled because they think they are. There are examples of people who live perfectly normal, active lives until they die. My great grandfather used to climb up on his roof and do home repairs because the grandkids were, quote, "pussies".

16 Nov 2012 07:48 PM
SacriliciousBeerSwiller     

beantowndog: SurfaceTension: My grandma fell for this same scam a few years ago. Felt awful because it was me they were impersonating.

What did you do with the money?


This is why I love fark. Well, that and trolling lawyers and doctors. But mainly this.

16 Nov 2012 07:49 PM
skinink     
Her grandson was scamming her because he needed money for his Phillipino LBFMs.

16 Nov 2012 07:50 PM
Forbidden Doughnut    [TotalFark]  
Almost all of the older members of my extended (& very dysfunctional) family are immune to this scam.

/ no empathy for other people & greedy
// they're members of the "Greatest Generation" that have always acted like Boomers, instead.
// at least my parents aren't like that...

16 Nov 2012 07:50 PM
dragon34     
Someone at a PA Costco saved my grandmother from doing this for my "cousin". The guy at the desk basically insisted that she try to call my cousin before allowing her to file the paperwork. When he answered and was like WTFRUTalkinabout she was greatly relieved.

The brazen asshole called her back asking where the money was an hour after she talked to my real cousin and she said, but we just spoke not an hour ago and you said you were fine.

So thanks random employee. My granny doesn't have much money to spare.

A few years back some woman claiming to be an old friend of my Aunt stole several hundred dollars in cash from my grandparents while she was "going to the bathroom" after being invited into my grandparents house.

Some people

16 Nov 2012 07:51 PM
deadplant     
Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.

16 Nov 2012 07:51 PM
jimmythefly     
12345

16 Nov 2012 07:56 PM
taurusowner     

deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.


XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Did it work?

16 Nov 2012 07:57 PM
kidgenius     

deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.


I know! That filter saved me once before too.

Here's my SSN:

XXX-XX-XXXX

16 Nov 2012 07:57 PM
jimmythefly     
Guess it doesn't do luggage combinations.

16 Nov 2012 07:57 PM
Eps05     

deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.


Yeah, go back to 4chan.

16 Nov 2012 07:58 PM
kidgenius     

taurusowner: deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.

XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Did it work?


It did!

It's good that Drew thought that filter up to help prevent scams here and give FARK a bad name.

16 Nov 2012 07:58 PM
jayphat     
Last year we did the same thing at my store. Older guy comes in and says he has to buy these green dot cards and send them to Jamaica because he has won the lottery and needs to buy them to pay the taxes. We didn't know thats what he was doing until he was up to nearly $2000 in cards. When we asked him if he thought it sounded a little strange, he yelled at us for "keeping an old man from his money." Surprise, it was a scam. And he was pissed. That these people had promised photographers to come take his picture and no-one ever showed up. Not the lose of money, that the farking camera crew never showed up.

16 Nov 2012 07:58 PM
Gyrfalcon    [TotalFark]  

ModernLuddite: taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?

I think it's one of two things:

1) You start stupid, and stay stupid. There are young people who just can't do certain things and refuse to learn or try to do it.....it's just a complete block people have on learning things. They say things like "I don't read".

2) A lot of people believe that you get infirm as you age, and talk themselves into it. My mother works at a retirement home, and says she sees it all the time - people who are perfectly healthy, and relatively young, who are just crippled because they think they are. There are examples of people who live perfectly normal, active lives until they die. My great grandfather used to climb up on his roof and do home repairs because the grandkids were, quote, "pussies".


It could also be that as they get old and lose contact with others, they hang onto the few people they have left. It's something that phone scammers know very well. They rarely scam oldsters who have lots of friends and close family members--they get most of their money from people who live alone and are estranged from the few relatives they have left. So the scammer is the only person who calls regularly and the old person will do anything to keep that person calling back. Or in this case, it could be the old lady doesn't have many grandchildren, and panicked when she thought her only grandson was in trouble thousands of miles away.

People like my aged grandmother, who is very close to my mom and calls her all the time, don't fall victim to these scams as much. My grandmother got a call from one of these freaks, telling her she'd won a huge amount of money and needed to send them X dollars for a "processing fee" and the first thing she did was call my mom to find out who she needed to report them to.

16 Nov 2012 07:59 PM
StreetlightInTheGhetto     

Britney Spear's Speculum: My parents/aunts/uncles have told my grandparents to never believe anything like this unless they are told by them.


A older volunteer at my office fell for that - her "grandson" said he was in jail in Canada and his Dad would throw him out of the house if he found out. That was very plausible so she wired it...

She did manage to get the local paper to write about it bc even though she felt incredibly f--king stupid she wanted others to know.

IIRC they had enough details to make it sound crazy plausible so they thought it had to be someone who knew him... but small town = easy to find details on a Facebook page and the same last name in town (white pages online adding age) probably is grandparents ...

/sucked

16 Nov 2012 08:09 PM
liltingbanshee     
I know a lady who fell for this scam. This is the same 86 year old lady who got taken by the "phone call from Microsoft" scam. She is a very intelligent and well-educated person, too, not senile as far as I can tell. I don't know why she falls for these things.

16 Nov 2012 08:10 PM
BolloxReader     

taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?


Yes, it is called getting old. I'm a specialist in senior insurance products, and one of the things that we (should) do is look out for cases of elder abuse, especially financial. Somewhere north of 70, the mind just stops thinking so critically. It's not a case where you can say that "This person is 85 and so is incompetent" (my father's aunt is in her '90s and lives independently, just got her first ever phone a few years ago) but you can say that in most people, for whatever reason, they just become easy to swindle. Many seniors just want to avoid conflict, they appreciate people who pay attention to them, and they know the world has changed a lot since when they were younger.

It's very disheartening how many houses get new roofs or driveways every year. It's even worse how many children and grandchildren actively steal from their elders.

I reported several cases to the local prosecutor's office last year, they have a special prosecutor specifically to take on senior abuse cases. But even those guys can be clueless about the financial risks involved with being a senior. You know how we are told to keep our Social Security numbers guarded, leave them at home, don't carry them with your drivers license, etc? Well, when you go on Medicare, your Medicare number is usually your Social Security number with a suffix. Every senior is advised to carry this card with them at all times. This special prosecutor had no idea this was the case. He spent a whole hour giving a presentation on safeguarding SS numbers to a group of seniors, and every one of them dipped into their wallets and brought out their cards, with their SS numbers clearly printed on them.

Because abusers can be family as well as strangers, it's real hard to figure out a good way to combat this other than increasing awareness. One of my clients was recieving a dozen copies each of ten magazines a month. The same "nice young lady" had kept coming back and she was so nice. No, I don't know why I'm getting these magazines. No, I don't know how much I'm paying for them. No, I don't read any of them. But she was such a nice young lady, you don't get polite kids like that anymore. No, I didn't know I was being charged for them, they just offered to send them to me. No, my children don't know about them.

And yet this same older woman is sharp enough to be very on guard about discussing her finances with the insurance agent she asked into her home to discuss those things. She was far more wary of me than of a random stranger knocking on her door.

And I would talk with probably a dozen seniors a year like this. Some were being ripped off for tens of thousands a year. All of them were over age 70.

16 Nov 2012 08:16 PM
Indubitably     
To fall on Fark...

*)

16 Nov 2012 08:17 PM
HighlanderRPI     
Guy I used to work with fell for the Russian Girlfriend scam - wired her a bunch of money for a plane ticket and such, then headed to the airport with a little sign to wait at the terminal for her. Even after multiple people at work told him it was a scam.

/she never showed
//He eventually got fired

16 Nov 2012 08:20 PM
toraque    [TotalFark]  

ShawnDoc: I wish it had been that easy to scam money out of my elderly relatives.


Hell, I just wish my elderly relatives had money. Or at least hadn't already written me out of their wills for that whole drunken 'mayonnaise and corgi pack' thing.

16 Nov 2012 08:21 PM
RAWISRADFORD     

Frozboz: Then there's people like me who take it a step farther and bait scammers into creating wooden and bronze AT-ATs:
 

Link


You are what you hate

16 Nov 2012 08:21 PM
yukichigai     

liltingbanshee: I know a lady who fell for this scam. This is the same 86 year old lady who got taken by the "phone call from Microsoft" scam. She is a very intelligent and well-educated person, too, not senile as far as I can tell. I don't know why she falls for these things.


My mom got one of those "Microsoft" phone calls. She's in her 60s but she's not computer un-savvy at all so she realized the scam right away. Still, every time I've heard about someone getting that call in the area it's always someone 50+. It's simultaneously eerie and sad.

16 Nov 2012 08:22 PM
Needlessly Complicated     

kidgenius: deadplant: Fark has built-in protection from scams too, like a "scam-filter" on posts.
It won't let you post SS or credit card numbers, it just blanks them out see:
XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX

Go ahead try it. It has to be a real number though, it checks somehow.

I know! That filter saved me once before too.

Here's my SSN:

XXX-XX-XXXX


Here's my Discover card number:

5438-3000-1345-0013

Did that work?

16 Nov 2012 08:24 PM
StreetlightInTheGhetto     

Gyrfalcon: ModernLuddite: taurusowner: I'm legitimately curious, does something happen in the human brain around a certain age that makes old people this way? I would imagine that this woman in question had a functioning brain when she was in her 30s for instance. I doubt she would have just given thousands of dollars to a stranger when she was young. What made her unable to rationally evaluate reality now? Similarly, why is it so much harder for older people to learn new skills? I'm not even talking about people in their 70s and 80s. Even adults in their later 40s and 50s seem to lose the ability to do new things. I'm sure I'm not the first person to try to teach an older mother or father how to use a computer. And yet simple stuff like "click the mouse here" is like trying to teach rocket surgery. I'm sure that when the first TVs or some other "new when they were young" piece of tech came out, they used to be pretty good at just learning how to use it. They learned how the 8 tracks in their cars worked. Why is learning a DVD player or how to print something now impossible? Someone who knows about brain chemistry or physiology; is there a medical reason for this kind of thing?

I think it's one of two things:

1) You start stupid, and stay stupid. There are young people who just can't do certain things and refuse to learn or try to do it.....it's just a complete block people have on learning things. They say things like "I don't read".

2) A lot of people believe that you get infirm as you age, and talk themselves into it. My mother works at a retirement home, and says she sees it all the time - people who are perfectly healthy, and relatively young, who are just crippled because they think they are. There are examples of people who live perfectly normal, active lives until they die. My great grandfather used to climb up on his roof and do home repairs because the grandkids were, quote, "pussies".

It could also be that as they get old and lose contact with others, they hang onto the few people they have left. It's something that phone scammers know very well. They rarely scam oldsters who have lots of friends and close family members--they get most of their money from people who live alone and are estranged from the few relatives they have left. So the scammer is the only person who calls regularly and the old person will do anything to keep that person calling back. Or in this case, it could be the old lady doesn't have many grandchildren, and panicked when she thought her only grandson was in trouble thousands of miles away.

People like my aged grandmother, who is very close to my mom and calls her all the time, don't fall victim to these scams as much. My grandmother got a call from one of these freaks, telling her she'd won a huge amount of money and needed to send them X dollars for a "processing fee" and the first thing she did was call my mom to find out who she needed to report them to.


Yeah... it's sad.

I've done non profit fundraising where older gentlemen - the 3 off the top of my head had just lost their long term spouse - would try to give me money - to keep - just because I spent time to talk to them. If there were kids they were states away... I always refused and said it had to go to the non-profit and then lied and said we couldn't take donations over X amount.

Sigh.

/no grandparents left myself
//but we saw my grandmoms at least once a week or more
///f--king broke my heart when one guy who tried to give me $50 within 5 minutes of meeting me said the waitress at a diner watched out for him but his in town daughter hadn't visited in a year

16 Nov 2012 08:25 PM
Showing 1-50 of 116 comments
Refresh Page 2
View Comments:
This thread is closed to new comments.


Back To Main

More Headlines:
Main | Sports | Business | Geek | Entertainment | Politics | Video | FarkUs | Contests | Fark Party | Combined