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   NASA's earthshaking Mars discovery is finding Han Solo frozen in carbonite. Well, actually, just carbon

04 Dec 2012 12:06 PM   |   11498 clicks   |   Yahoo
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SnarfVader     
Since Carbon is present in the entire universe well into the hundreds of parts per million, I would have been more surprised if they didn't find any.

04 Dec 2012 11:21 AM
TheOther     
Cabron would be more interesting.

04 Dec 2012 12:08 PM
dittybopper    [TotalFark]  
NASA's earthshaking Mars discovery is finding Han Solo frozen in carbonite. Well, actually, just carbon

They found Han Solo frozen in carbon? That is big news.

04 Dec 2012 12:09 PM
LarryDan43     
It's a squatch.

04 Dec 2012 12:09 PM
occamswrist     
Now nasa can carbon date mars.

I winder what age it will be?

04 Dec 2012 12:09 PM
tricycleracer     

TheOther: Cabron would be more interesting.


www.hrwiki.orgView Full Size

04 Dec 2012 12:09 PM
That Reilly Monster     
FTFA: Even with carbon and water, life needs other chemicals, such as sulfur, oxygen, phosphorous and nitrogen, to form and evolve.

Statements like this irk me. Would it be too much to ask for "life as we understand it needs other chemicals..."?

04 Dec 2012 12:10 PM
Maktaka     
This is a shiatty headline and article, some careful reading is required to get any value out of it. They found carbon COMPOUNDS, specifically organic ones. They're not inherently indicative of life, but they are a requirement for life to exist which means it's one more item that Mars has which would allow for life to exist there.

04 Dec 2012 12:11 PM
PJ-     

occamswrist: Now nasa can carbon date mars.

I winder what age it will be?


About 6000 years old give or take.

04 Dec 2012 12:13 PM
Pawprint     

dittybopper: NASA's earthshaking Mars discovery is finding Han Solo frozen in carbonite. Well, actually, just carbon

They found Han Solo frozen in carbon? That is big news.


Came here to say this. Thank you.

04 Dec 2012 12:15 PM
Wade_Wilson     
zs1.smbc-comics.comView Full Size

04 Dec 2012 12:15 PM
tuxq     
so even martians had reply-to-all? no wonder their world turned to dust.

04 Dec 2012 12:16 PM
Skyd1v     

That Reilly Monster: FTFA: Even with carbon and water, life needs other chemicals, such as sulfur, oxygen, phosphorous and nitrogen, to form and evolve.

Statements like this irk me. Would it be too much to ask for "life as we understand it needs other chemicals..."?


Bothered me as well. Should have read "Even with carbon and water, life on Earth needs yaddayaddayadda".

Silicone based life-forms frown on this reporters shenanigans.

img829.imageshack.usView Full Size

04 Dec 2012 12:17 PM
JackieRabbit     
I'm glad NASA is being so guarded about this. Too bad the press isn't. NASA has been stung a couple of times by contamination brought with the spacecraft from earth, so they are being very cautious about what they have actually "found".

04 Dec 2012 12:17 PM
Jubeebee     
"It's not unexpected that this sand pile would not be rich in organics. It's been exposed to the harsh Martian environment," added planetary scientist Paul Mahaffy

Let's not add any more not unnecessary negatives to this not uninformative sentence.

04 Dec 2012 12:18 PM
Secret Polish Boyfriend     

Maktaka: This is a shiatty headline and article, some careful reading is required to get any value out of it. They found carbon COMPOUNDS, specifically organic ones. They're not inherently indicative of life, but they are a requirement for life to exist which means it's one more item that Mars has which would allow for life to exist there.


They found "hints of carbon". Mars also has a woody aftertaste with the slightest suggestion of carbon dioxide. However, Curiosity has a very technically correct but unsophisticated palate.

04 Dec 2012 12:21 PM
ObscureNameHere     
Did they find out where Han's vest disappeared to, then re-appeared from, just before he was frozen?

/go watch TESB closely....

04 Dec 2012 12:22 PM
Proteios1     
Carbon. Simply a mind numbing discovery. And at a cost of only $20 billion, such a better investment than the Obama stimulus funds.

04 Dec 2012 12:22 PM
ObscureNameHere     

tricycleracer: TheOther: Cabron would be more interesting.

[www.hrwiki.org image 720x470]


"Umm.. you just keep doing your thing, man."

04 Dec 2012 12:23 PM
JackieRabbit     

Skyd1v: That Reilly Monster: FTFA: Even with carbon and water, life needs other chemicals, such as sulfur, oxygen, phosphorous and nitrogen, to form and evolve.

Statements like this irk me. Would it be too much to ask for "life as we understand it needs other chemicals..."?

Bothered me as well. Should have read "Even with carbon and water, life on Earth needs yaddayaddayadda".

Silicone based life-forms frown on this reporters shenanigans.

[img829.imageshack.us image 640x480]


"Damn it, Skyd1v, I'm a doctor, not a bricklayer!"

04 Dec 2012 12:25 PM
abhorrent1    [TotalFark]  
Clicks "enlarge image" link. Image doesn't get larger. FFFFFFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU

04 Dec 2012 12:25 PM
Biness     
wouldn't you know it, they put ONE SUV on mars, and already theres a carbon problem.

/manbearpig

04 Dec 2012 12:25 PM
Fark Rye For Many Whores     

Jubeebee: "It's not unexpected that this sand pile would not be rich in organics. It's been exposed to the harsh Martian environment," added planetary scientist Paul Mahaffy


What kind of name is Mahaffy? Ma- Ma- wait. Is this a martian name?

0.tqn.comView Full Size

04 Dec 2012 12:28 PM
badaboom     
images2.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size

04 Dec 2012 12:28 PM
Stone Meadow     
So they found traces of carbon on Mars? Meh...I guess NASA never heard of carbonaceous chondrites, eh?

04 Dec 2012 12:30 PM
Adolf Oliver Nipples    [TotalFark]  

Biness: wouldn't you know it, they put ONE SUV on mars, and already theres a carbon problem.

/manbearpig


WINNAH!

i3.kym-cdn.comView Full Size

04 Dec 2012 12:30 PM
dittybopper    [TotalFark]  
I'd be surprised if they *DIDN'T* find carbon. It's one of the most common elements, and the atmosphere itself is 95% carbon dioxide.

04 Dec 2012 12:31 PM
Prince George    [TotalFark]  
Carbon is the fourth most common element in the milky way. Congratulations, you've discovered dirt!

Quick shut off the rover it's causing carbon emissions. Now we've ruined Mars too damn it.

04 Dec 2012 12:36 PM
beefoe     
4th most common element in the universe.
Atmosphere mostly CO2
Nearest planet loaded with carbon

Truly shocking finding!

04 Dec 2012 12:37 PM
Perducci     

ObscureNameHere: Did they find out where Han's vest disappeared to, then re-appeared from, just before he was frozen?

/go watch TESB closely....


He started taking it off when Leia was coming on to him. Then she brought up the whole "love" thing and ruined the mood, so he got dressed. Duh.

04 Dec 2012 12:37 PM
KingKauff    [TotalFark]  

PJ-: occamswrist: Now nasa can carbon date mars.

I winder what age it will be?

About 6000 years old give or take.


I think a little less since Mars is smaller than Earth and hasn't had time to put on that extra weight.

04 Dec 2012 12:38 PM
ChipNASA    [TotalFark]  
img3.findthebest.comView Full Size

04 Dec 2012 12:38 PM
ObscureNameHere     

Perducci: ObscureNameHere: Did they find out where Han's vest disappeared to, then re-appeared from, just before he was frozen?

/go watch TESB closely....

He started taking it off when Leia was coming on to him. Then she brought up the whole "love" thing and ruined the mood, so he got dressed. Duh.


Nice...
Of course, if THAT was the mood he was going for, I am now not sure how to interpret the fact he told Chewie to 'look after her'.

04 Dec 2012 12:41 PM
fanbladesaresharp     
OH you silly scientists. Always wanting to go stick your dicks in the sand somewhere and call it life.

/how is mars babby formed?

04 Dec 2012 12:42 PM
KingKauff    [TotalFark]  

ObscureNameHere: Did they find out where Han's vest disappeared to, then re-appeared from, just before he was frozen?

/go watch TESB closely....


Lando took it, tried it on, then gave it back.

04 Dec 2012 12:43 PM
USCLaw2010     
images1.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size


Can we convert it into a rod?

04 Dec 2012 12:44 PM
mutterfark    [TotalFark]  
Just wait until the Martians living in their home soil realise that the rovers were built by ugly bags of mostly water.

04 Dec 2012 12:45 PM
Biness     

mutterfark: Just wait until the Martians living in their home soil realise that the rovers were built by ugly bags of mostly water.


your mom built the rover? thats awesome.

04 Dec 2012 12:46 PM
DubtodaIll     

Proteios1: Carbon. Simply a mind numbing discovery. And at a cost of only $20 billion, such a better investment than the Obama stimulus funds.


I'll bite. There is no better use of profits than exploration. Humanity will always be beset by its own fallacies and therefore spending too much on social problems is a much larger waste of funds than discovering new knowledge and territory to infect with our selves.

04 Dec 2012 12:47 PM
Biness     

mutterfark: Just wait until the Martians living in their home soil realise that the rovers were built by ugly bags of mostly water.


i bet the martians feel like a big bag of sand

04 Dec 2012 12:47 PM
brantgoose    [TotalFark]  
Well, actually they found more than organic carbon. Some of the other elements which are necessary to Earth life, such as sulfur, were also found. The real interesting data should come from the mountain where rocks of different ages are exposed. We won't see that data for some time.

If you were an alien looking for life on Earth you would note the presence of liquid water and be hopeful. You would note the large amount of free Nitrogen and Oxygen, both of which are sufficiently reactive to be doomed to be locked up in soil and rocks unless replenished constantly and you would be optimistic. Living organisms keep our atmosphere composition in the highly improbable state of being composed of about 20% Oxygen and over 70% Nitrogen. If we spotted a similar atmosphere we would be confident that it is a world like our own.

Traces of CO2 would be intriguing to alien scientists. That is a fairly stable gas but it would seem odd that there is so little of it, but just the right amount to keep water liquid. Mars and Venus have atmospheres are are 98% or more CO2, one very thick and hot, one very thin and cool. Earth has a fine regulatory system that keeps things improbable and lively. It is life itself.

Methane would neither confirm life nor disprove it, but methane can be a sign of life. And of course, the man-made greenhouse gases would be a dead giveaway that the planet is inhabited by morans who haven't learn to work within the system rather than against it.

Mars has methane although it is not known whether the source is biological or geological. It is leaking out of the ground in some interesting places where life would be likely on, say, Antarctica.

The surface of Mars is rich in perchlorates. This is not a good sign, but it is not impossible that bacteria can use perchlorates to survive under harsh conditions or produce them as waste.

Life on Mars, if it was ever there and if it survives, is most likely underground, in the vicinity of volcanic vents and possibly mud volcanoes, liquid water below the surface, or possibly in the ice caps. It'll take some time to locate, but by looking at a variety of rock strata scientists should form a clearer geological picture of the history of Mars over the last four billion years, during which life very slowly evolved. About three billion years of that time life consisted of microbes.

Most of the work of evolution went into building cells and learning to control genetic information and gene expression so you get accurate transmission of information but not TOO accurate transmission, which would mean excessive conservatism and lack of innovation and adaptation. Once you have cells, you can stick them together into all sorts of interesting shapes like little computerized Lego bricks with tiny minds of their own. You can even build brains, although this is highly improbable and possibly counter-productive.

Like walking, evolution is a sort of controlled falling on your face.

04 Dec 2012 12:58 PM
Holocaust Agnostic     

occamswrist: Now nasa can carbon date mars.

I winder what age it will be?


[Morbo]CARBON DATING DOESN'T WORK THAT WAY[/Morbo]

04 Dec 2012 12:59 PM
bongmiester    [TotalFark]  
did they find an interesting rock formation?

3.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size

04 Dec 2012 12:59 PM
TheDirtyNacho     
Go search for better articles. Carbon compounds were found.

I'm not breaking out the champagne over it, but it's more interesting than elemental carbon.

Also, Viking found these too but were dismissed as contamination, mostly because they had no way of knowing whether they came from earth or not. Later missions to mars would be better controlled to reduce this potential contamination.

04 Dec 2012 01:08 PM
washington-babylon     

Skyd1v: That Reilly Monster: FTFA: Even with carbon and water, life needs other chemicals, such as sulfur, oxygen, phosphorous and nitrogen, to form and evolve.

Statements like this irk me. Would it be too much to ask for "life as we understand it needs other chemicals..."?

Bothered me as well. Should have read "Even with carbon and water, life on Earth needs yaddayaddayadda".

Silicone based life-forms frown on this reporters shenanigans.

[img829.imageshack.us image 640x480]


Silicone:
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size


Silicone:
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size


Silicon:
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size


Silicon:
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size


See the difference? Are we clear now? What life forms are we talking about, exactly?

/pet peeve

04 Dec 2012 01:14 PM
That Guy...From That Show!     

ObscureNameHere: Did they find out where Han's vest disappeared to, then re-appeared from, just before he was frozen?

/go watch TESB closely....


That'll have to be fixed in the next release so show it shows that what really happened is that Han devested first.

04 Dec 2012 01:18 PM
Skyd1v     

washington-babylon: Skyd1v:
See the difference? Are we clear now? What life forms are we talking about, exactly?

/pet peeve


Frankly, I would prefer the "Happy Fun-time Enhancing" Silicone life forms over the "Smashy, Burny" Silicon ones, but that's just me.

04 Dec 2012 01:19 PM
TheDirtyNacho     

brantgoose: Well, actually they found more than organic carbon. Some of the other elements which are necessary to Earth life, such as sulfur, were also found. The real interesting data should come from the mountain where rocks of different ages are exposed. We won't see that data for some time.

If you were an alien looking for life on Earth you would note the presence of liquid water and be hopeful. You would note the large amount of free Nitrogen and Oxygen, both of which are sufficiently reactive to be doomed to be locked up in soil and rocks unless replenished constantly and you would be optimistic. Living organisms keep our atmosphere composition in the highly improbable state of being composed of about 20% Oxygen and over 70% Nitrogen. If we spotted a similar atmosphere we would be confident that it is a world like our own.

Traces of CO2 would be intriguing to alien scientists. That is a fairly stable gas but it would seem odd that there is so little of it, but just the right amount to keep water liquid. Mars and Venus have atmospheres are are 98% or more CO2, one very thick and hot, one very thin and cool. Earth has a fine regulatory system that keeps things improbable and lively. It is life itself.

Methane would neither confirm life nor disprove it, but methane can be a sign of life. And of course, the man-made greenhouse gases would be a dead giveaway that the planet is inhabited by morans who haven't learn to work within the system rather than against it.

Mars has methane although it is not known whether the source is biological or geological. It is leaking out of the ground in some interesting places where life would be likely on, say, Antarctica.

The surface of Mars is rich in perchlorates. This is not a good sign, but it is not impossible that bacteria can use perchlorates to survive under harsh conditions or produce them as waste.

Life on Mars, if it was ever there and if it survives, is most likely underground, in the vicinity of volcanic vents and possibly ...



My gut feeling is that simple life was once widespread on Mars, and likely still exists in habitable pockets. But nasa is right to take a very conservative viewpoint and build a solid case. It just takes so long because we get to send one probe at a time every few years, and then build new probes based on what they discover.

04 Dec 2012 01:20 PM
Mugato    [TotalFark]  

ChipNASA: [img3.findthebest.com image 257x207]


"Your life is on your computer"? That's their tag line? Only someone whose life is on their computer would write a tag line like that.

04 Dec 2012 01:20 PM
Decados    [TotalFark]  

Proteios1: Carbon. Simply a mind numbing discovery. And at a cost of only $20 billion, such a better investment than the Obama stimulus funds.


So are you one of those dunce heads that things that we just put a pallete of 20 billion dollars onto a rocket and shot it up into the atmosphere. I mean, it's not like that 20 billion of dollars was spend on people's paychecks and such, for contracors and sub contractors. It's not like any of that money was actually spend on EARTH or anything like that.

04 Dec 2012 01:22 PM
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