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   If Kudzu is taking over your yard maybe you should eat it

05 Dec 2012 08:15 AM   |   6753 clicks   |   Mother Nature Network
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gopher321    [TotalFark]  
Immigrants are taking over my neighbourhood...

/so confused

05 Dec 2012 08:11 AM
sniderman     
community.logos.comView Full Size
 

Bon appetit!

05 Dec 2012 08:17 AM
vegas_greaser     
wonder if you would end up lile the tree man from creepshow after eating kudzu?

05 Dec 2012 08:22 AM
Mega Steve     
But what if I like it? Do I have to marry it?

05 Dec 2012 08:35 AM
Pelvic Splanchnic Ganglion     
Chief! Chief! The kudzu's done took over the town! Better get out while you can!

05 Dec 2012 08:38 AM
unchellmatt     
Personally I'm a fan of purslane. Here is a tasty purslane and zucchini soup recipe.

vegas_greaser: wonder if you would end up lile the tree man from creepshow after eating kudzu?


In Soviet Creepshow, plants eat YOU!

web.mit.eduView Full Size

05 Dec 2012 08:39 AM
KrispyKritter     
clean out your drawers and quit saving those seeds motherfarkers. get out there and plant that shiat high and low. tell your friends to plant too. in 5 years the country will look like...well, i don't know what it will look like, but the deer will be getting whacked that's for sure.

/actually not sure if deer 'party', if you know what i mean

05 Dec 2012 08:40 AM
fappomatic     
The article is incorrect. Kudzu can grow as much as 8 feet a day in the peak of the growing season. We can thank President Roosevelt for its infestation of every national park in the Southeast.

That said, milkweed is the poor man's asparagus. Harvest before the seed pods open and boil. Yum!

05 Dec 2012 08:40 AM
JackieRabbit     
Are they kidding me? Kudzu tastes like shiat. Cows won't eat it and if they do decide to give it a try, it ruins their milk. So far, beyond the erosion control for which it was introduced, only use for the plant has been found: as a source for bio-fuel.

05 Dec 2012 08:41 AM
DeltaPunch     
Somebody finally get around to reading the Wikipedia page on kudzu? I'm pretty sure the Japanese have been eating it for a long time, it's commonly used as animal feed, and the roots can be ground up to make a white powder which is commonly used in vegan/macrobiotic dishes as a thickener (healthier alternative to flour, say).

Carry on...

05 Dec 2012 08:45 AM
SugarPlumFarie     
I've eaten 3 of then, regularly. Kudzu jelly is pretty good. I buy it every fall. I actually just pick up Kudzu-jalapeno jelly to try.
Dandelion salad is nice and bitter, great with real honey mustard. And Knotweed is used in Asian vitamins.
Downside....your pee smells horrible ^-^

05 Dec 2012 08:46 AM
aagrajag     

JackieRabbit: Are they kidding me? Kudzu tastes like shiat. Cows won't eat it and if they do decide to give it a try, it ruins their milk. So far, beyond the erosion control for which it was introduced, only use for the plant has been found: as a source for bio-fuel.


Kudzu-mochi is quite tasty.

05 Dec 2012 08:47 AM
Pelvic Splanchnic Ganglion     

SugarPlumFarie: .your pee smells horrible ^-^


How do you know what my pee smells like? Are you stalking me?

05 Dec 2012 08:48 AM
wheatpennyandaglock     
" if it's oregano, then you can use it in your soup"

05 Dec 2012 08:52 AM
Sybarite    [TotalFark]  
myplay.comView Full Size


Approves

05 Dec 2012 08:53 AM
The Southern Logic Company     

fappomatic: The article is incorrect. Kudzu can grow as much as 8 feet a day in the peak of the growing season. We can thank President Roosevelt for its infestation of every national park in the Southeast.


This.

In Atlanta, there are areas where abandoned houses are being slowly destroyed by kudzu. Nearly impossible to kill that shiat for good, my children's children will still be trying to kill of kudzu.

05 Dec 2012 08:54 AM
mortimer_ford     

vegas_greaser: wonder if you would end up lile the tree man from creepshow after eating kudzu?


An alcoholic?

05 Dec 2012 08:55 AM
freetomato    [TotalFark]  

JackieRabbit: Are they kidding me? Kudzu tastes like shiat. Cows won't eat it and if they do decide to give it a try, it ruins their milk. So far, beyond the erosion control for which it was introduced, only use for the plant has been found: as a source for bio-fuel.


Here in GA, they've been bringing in goats to eat it. Those critters have iron stomachs and they are pretty cute

I actually have one of those old gardening books that suggests it for erosion control. It gave me a good laugh when I read it.

05 Dec 2012 08:56 AM
JackieRabbit     

fappomatic: We can thank President Roosevelt for its infestation of every national park in the Southeast.


And you are wrong, too. Kudzu predates either president Roosevelt. It was introduced in 1883, initially as an ornamental and then as an erosion control plant. It was planted extensively in the Southern Appalachian around the turn of the century to stop the horrific erosion there that resulted from unregulated forestry, which stripped entire mountains bare of their trees.

05 Dec 2012 09:04 AM
give me doughnuts     

vegas_greaser: wonder if you would end up lile the tree man from creepshow after eating kudzu?


Nah, that's only after you get meteor-shiat on your fingers.

05 Dec 2012 09:05 AM
vodka     
I have never once seen flowers on kudzu, what makes it flower?

05 Dec 2012 09:05 AM
bsharitt     
I don't know about the leaves, but Kudzu jelly made from the flowers is pretty tasty.

05 Dec 2012 09:07 AM
give me doughnuts     

DeltaPunch: Somebody finally get around to reading the Wikipedia page on kudzu? I'm pretty sure the Japanese have been eating it for a long time, it's commonly used as animal feed, and the roots can be ground up to make a white powder which is commonly used in vegan/macrobiotic dishes as a thickener (healthier alternative to flour, say).

Carry on...


Fibers from the stems are good for making cloth and paper, too.

05 Dec 2012 09:11 AM
tennessee.hillbilly     
During one of their first visits to us 10 years ago, my in-laws who live in Houston, were walking through our neighborhood. My MIL remarked to my FIL upon coming up on some kudzu "Wow, this vine is really pretty. We need to take some cuttings back with us. It would look lovely on our --some random spot I forget--."

I laughed and told my FIL, who owned and ran a turf-and-chemical business in Houston, "Yeah, you ought to do that. That way she could be known as the Typhoid Mary of Montgomery County."

He of course, knew what kudzu was and the joke I was making, and told her, "Put that shiat down and hush. That's the last thing you want to bring across the Mississippi."

/csb

05 Dec 2012 09:11 AM
give me doughnuts     

vodka: I have never once seen flowers on kudzu, what makes it flower?


April showers.

05 Dec 2012 09:12 AM
rev. dave     
Uh, No. But I would like to have some goats. Unfortunately zoning won't allow it so I use harsh chemicals instead.

05 Dec 2012 09:18 AM
crowbar032     
As a double plus fun bonus, Kudzu gives rattlesnakes and copperheads plenty of places to hide. My relatives in SE Ky keep a few goats around the house to keep it eat back so they don't get over-run with snakes.

05 Dec 2012 09:24 AM
freetomato    [TotalFark]  

tennessee.hillbilly: During one of their first visits to us 10 years ago, my in-laws who live in Houston, were walking through our neighborhood. My MIL remarked to my FIL upon coming up on some kudzu "Wow, this vine is really pretty. We need to take some cuttings back with us. It would look lovely on our --some random spot I forget--."

I laughed and told my FIL, who owned and ran a turf-and-chemical business in Houston, "Yeah, you ought to do that. That way she could be known as the Typhoid Mary of Montgomery County."

He of course, knew what kudzu was and the joke I was making, and told her, "Put that shiat down and hush. That's the last thing you want to bring across the Mississippi."

/csb


A friend from Mendocino County CA visited us a while a back and was fascinated/horrified by kudzu. As a gag, we found a vine about 12' long and went into his suitcase, winding it through the sleeves of his shirts, through the fly of his boxers, in and around everything he'd packed. He didn't find it amusing at all and in retrospect, I'd have hated myself if a seed had found its way out west and the giant redwoods ended up covered in kudzu.

05 Dec 2012 09:25 AM
Carn     

fappomatic: The article is incorrect. Kudzu can grow as much as 8 feet a day in the peak of the growing season. We can thank President Roosevelt for its infestation of every national park in the Southeast.

That said, milkweed is the poor man's asparagus. Harvest before the seed pods open and boil. Yum!


The interwebs tells me milkweed is poisonous to humans. Does boiling neutralize the bad stuff?

05 Dec 2012 09:29 AM
you have pee hands     

freetomato: A friend from Mendocino County CA visited us a while a back and was fascinated/horrified by kudzu. As a gag, we found a vine about 12' long and went into his suitcase, winding it through the sleeves of his shirts, through the fly of his boxers, in and around everything he'd packed. He didn't find it amusing at all and in retrospect, I'd have hated myself if a seed had found its way out west and the giant redwoods ended up covered in kudzu.


At least there you could wait til the dry season and set it all on fire. Brush fires are nothing to a redwood.

05 Dec 2012 09:31 AM
Tr0mBoNe    [TotalFark]  
Human is an invasive species.

Also, delicious.

/long pig

05 Dec 2012 09:34 AM
Another Government Employee     

vodka: I have never once seen flowers on kudzu, what makes it flower?


It flowers in September, usually. Small purple or pink blooms. Usually lasts about a week.

05 Dec 2012 09:52 AM
Mr.Hawk     
3. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)


It does amaze me that some people have a ton of these right in their yard but they buy salad in a bag at a market with this very leaf in it...

05 Dec 2012 10:00 AM
JackieRabbit     

Mr.Hawk: 3. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)


It does amaze me that some people have a ton of these right in their yard but they buy salad in a bag at a market with this very leaf in it...


But, but... The dandelion in your yard is only for Rounduping and real food must come from the store, right?

05 Dec 2012 10:20 AM
mod3072     
I make wine out of the dandelions that grow in my yard. I'm helping and getting drunk at the same time!!

05 Dec 2012 10:24 AM
BKITU    [TotalFark]  
CTRL-F Euell NOT FOUND

CTRL-F Gibbons NOT FOUND

CTRL-F Did you ever eat a pine tree NOT FOUND

I am very disappoint. Or very old.

/"The taste of Kudzu reminds me of wild hickory nuts!"

05 Dec 2012 10:54 AM
fappomatic     

JackieRabbit: fappomatic: We can thank President Roosevelt for its infestation of every national park in the Southeast.

And you are wrong, too. Kudzu predates either president Roosevelt. It was introduced in 1883, initially as an ornamental and then as an erosion control plant. It was planted extensively in the Southern Appalachian around the turn of the century to stop the horrific erosion there that resulted from unregulated forestry, which stripped entire mountains bare of their trees.


Roosevelt authorized its use in the National Parks for erosion control during road construction. I didn't say he was responsible for it everywhere.

05 Dec 2012 11:00 AM
Nick Nostril     
How about no.

05 Dec 2012 12:32 PM
Mr.Hawk     

JackieRabbit: Mr.Hawk: 3. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)


It does amaze me that some people have a ton of these right in their yard but they buy salad in a bag at a market with this very leaf in it...

But, but... The dandelion in your yard is only for Rounduping and real food must come from the store, right?


i478.photobucket.comView Full Size

05 Dec 2012 12:39 PM
President Merkin Muffley     
oldnewsissoexciting.jpg

05 Dec 2012 12:55 PM
JackieRabbit     

fappomatic: JackieRabbit: fappomatic: We can thank President Roosevelt for its infestation of every national park in the Southeast.

And you are wrong, too. Kudzu predates either president Roosevelt. It was introduced in 1883, initially as an ornamental and then as an erosion control plant. It was planted extensively in the Southern Appalachian around the turn of the century to stop the horrific erosion there that resulted from unregulated forestry, which stripped entire mountains bare of their trees.

Roosevelt authorized its use in the National Parks for erosion control during road construction. I didn't say he was responsible for it everywhere.


And you are still wrong. FDR had nothing to do with the dissemination of kudzu beyond his creating the Civilian Conservation Corps. It was the CCC that decided to plant Kudzu in the Southeast as an erosion control method. The plant had become a problem in other areas long before this. The USDA removed the plant from its list of acceptable ground covers in 1953, but it had been too late for a long time. Further, FDR never authorized the use of the plant in the national parks. You are confusing FDR with Theodore Roosevelt, who created the national parks system.

05 Dec 2012 12:56 PM
ciberido     

Sybarite: [myplay.com image 480x360]

Approves


You better chow down, or it's gonna get cold ....

05 Dec 2012 01:21 PM
Makh    [TotalFark]  
List fails without garlic mustard. Which is in the mustard family but tastes like garlic greens. Frikken awesome pesto.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alliari a_petiolata

05 Dec 2012 01:35 PM
big pig peaches     

Makh: List fails without garlic mustard. Which is in the mustard family but tastes like garlic greens. Frikken awesome pesto.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alliaria _petiolata


That sounds awesome. Do you just use the raw leaves?

05 Dec 2012 02:43 PM
Ronin_S     
I was short of cash one time the first time I had moved out on my own, but it was during the growing season, so I dug up dandelion leaves and fiddleheads to stretch my food budget until I was able to get some more work on the side.

05 Dec 2012 03:01 PM
Clemkadidlefark     
Uh ... no

cdn.c.photoshelter.comView Full Size

05 Dec 2012 03:46 PM
Makh    [TotalFark]  

big pig peaches: That sounds awesome. Do you just use the raw leaves?


You can. It is now my favorite weed.

http://www.maipc.org/morerecipes.htm l

05 Dec 2012 04:35 PM
give me doughnuts     

Mr.Hawk: 3. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)


It does amaze me that some people have a ton of these right in their yard but they buy salad in a bag at a market with this very leaf in it...


"Field Greens" or "Spring Mix" often includes a bunch of stuff you can find growing in a vacant lot.

05 Dec 2012 05:02 PM
Halstread     
Kudzu root is used in my herbal snuff, along with Corn Silk. Neither is delicious. Still better than mouth cancer, I guess.

05 Dec 2012 05:26 PM
cretinbob     
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05 Dec 2012 06:43 PM
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