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   Best Korea seeks to break the elusive 81 second space flight barrier

08 Dec 2012 12:21 PM   |   6427 clicks   |   Fox News
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ElLoco     
"U.S. officials believe is aimed at showing the world its missiles can strike anywhere."

They can already do that. Unfortunately for NK, 'anywhere' is still currently random.

08 Dec 2012 12:24 PM
Summoner101     

ElLoco: "U.S. officials believe is aimed at showing the world its missiles can strike anywhere."

They can already do that. Unfortunately for NK, 'anywhere' is still currently random.


Knowing Best Korea, that's probably by design.

08 Dec 2012 12:26 PM
scotchcrotch     
"Anywhere" meaning a random spot in the ocean

08 Dec 2012 12:27 PM
LoneVVolf     
"expected to take place between Monday and Dec. 22" Author should be sent to North Korea without papers for writing that. Use compatible units when describing a range!

08 Dec 2012 12:28 PM
boozehat     
Nice headline. "World on edge ahead of N. Korea's pending satellite launch"....

really? the world is on edge about this?

08 Dec 2012 12:30 PM
7480325115184371z     
On a somewhat related note that would probably have come up anyway, I'm curious what the most realistic scenario is for the future of "Best Korea".

The world, particularly America, China and Russia, seem to be entirely apathetic about the brutal regime of a few thousand that sees millions of people living under the unending fear of torture, execution, and constant famine that has seen millions die and entire generations left malnourished and underdeveloped while a stone's throw away lies arguably the most technologically advanced civilization and city in the world.

How does the whole thing end? Is there a plausible non-military solution to the dilemma?

I mean it would be an undertaking like East/West Germany, but magnified tenfold. Generations of brainwashed people, millions and millions of starving people, capital investment requirements from the South that would make the German solidarity tax look like a pittance, etc.

I've been meaning to see if there's a recent book written on the topic.

08 Dec 2012 12:35 PM
No Time To Explain     
81 seconds? Phhsssht, I could last longer

/she knew better

08 Dec 2012 12:38 PM
das     
Nice hats.

08 Dec 2012 12:38 PM
ka1axy     
Best Korea's third string rocket scientists hoping they'll get to see Christmas...

08 Dec 2012 12:45 PM
bugmn99     
Best Korea can strike any time. Anywhere! Without warning!!!

(Unless there's snow)

08 Dec 2012 12:45 PM
spawn73    [TotalFark]  

7480325115184371z: onstant famine that has seen millions die and entire generations left malnourished and underdeveloped while a stone's throw away lies arguably the most technologically advanced civilization and city in the world.


North Korea isn't close to Europe.

08 Dec 2012 12:46 PM
martid4    [TotalFark]  
I wish they would hit Fox News.

08 Dec 2012 12:47 PM
Mega Steve     
North Korea says it has only peaceful intentions, but the impoverished and chronically belligerent nation

That is probably the greatest description of Best Korea I've ever read

08 Dec 2012 12:48 PM
martid4    [TotalFark]  
Did someone blink?

a57.foxnews.comView Full Size

08 Dec 2012 12:49 PM
Fear the Clam     

7480325115184371z: The world...seem to be entirely apathetic about the brutal regime of a few thousand that sees millions of people living under the unending fear of torture, execution, and constant famine that has seen millions die and entire generations left malnourished and underdeveloped while a stone's throw away lies arguably the most technologically advanced civilization and city in the world.


You mean like the Soviet Union?

08 Dec 2012 12:51 PM
Great_Milenko     

7480325115184371z: On a somewhat related note that would probably have come up anyway, I'm curious what the most realistic scenario is for the future of "Best Korea".

The world, particularly America, China and Russia, seem to be entirely apathetic about the brutal regime of a few thousand that sees millions of people living under the unending fear of torture, execution, and constant famine that has seen millions die and entire generations left malnourished and underdeveloped while a stone's throw away lies arguably the most technologically advanced civilization and city in the world.

How does the whole thing end? Is there a plausible non-military solution to the dilemma?

I mean it would be an undertaking like East/West Germany, but magnified tenfold. Generations of brainwashed people, millions and millions of starving people, capital investment requirements from the South that would make the German solidarity tax look like a pittance, etc.

I've been meaning to see if there's a recent book written on the topic.


All they need to do is discover oil, uranium, gold, or some rare metals used in electronics manufacturing and the liberation of the downtrodden people of North Korea will be the most important issue in the world.

08 Dec 2012 12:53 PM
fjnorton    [TotalFark]  
Wouldn't it be great if it went right into Pyongyang and detonated perfectly

08 Dec 2012 01:05 PM
fjnorton    [TotalFark]  
Sorry I meant "Wouldn't it be terrible if it went right into Pyongyang and detonated perfectly"

08 Dec 2012 01:07 PM
Jon iz teh kewl     
multiplayerblog.mtv.comView Full Size

08 Dec 2012 01:09 PM
zamboni    [TotalFark]  

scotchcrotch: "Anywhere" meaning a random spot in the ocean


They'll let us know what the target was after its successful flight and controlled descent.

Just be patient.

08 Dec 2012 01:12 PM
Charlie Freak    [TotalFark]  

7480325115184371z: On a somewhat related note that would probably have come up anyway, I'm curious what the most realistic scenario is for the future of "Best Korea".

The world, particularly America, China and Russia, seem to be entirely apathetic about the brutal regime of a few thousand that sees millions of people living under the unending fear of torture, execution, and constant famine that has seen millions die and entire generations left malnourished and underdeveloped while a stone's throw away lies arguably the most technologically advanced civilization and city in the world.

How does the whole thing end? Is there a plausible non-military solution to the dilemma?

I mean it would be an undertaking like East/West Germany, but magnified tenfold. Generations of brainwashed people, millions and millions of starving people, capital investment requirements from the South that would make the German solidarity tax look like a pittance, etc.

I've been meaning to see if there's a recent book written on the topic.


Nothing to Lose is excellent.

08 Dec 2012 01:14 PM
zamboni    [TotalFark]  

martid4: Did someone blink?


a57.foxnews.comView Full Size

I wish one of the guys on the left would get my bags and show me to my room.

Hey... fat boy on the right... could ya catch the door. There might be a sandwich in it for ya. C'mon... chop chop.

08 Dec 2012 01:16 PM
AtlanticCoast63     
a57.foxnews.comView Full Size


"Man, look at those people eat - you'd think they'd never seen food before!"

"Ummm, wait,,,,"

08 Dec 2012 01:23 PM
Jedekai     

boozehat: Nice headline. "World on edge ahead of N. Korea's pending satellite launch"....

really? the world is on edge about this?


Yep. Waiting to burst out laughing when it either explodes harmlessly in mid-air, fails to get off the ground or winds up going so far off-course that other nations are going to retrieve it, give it back to them and say, "That was cute. Useless, but cute. You ARE a real country, Best Korea!"

08 Dec 2012 01:38 PM
Beanlet     
I want to see Japan shoot down the missile if it leaves Best Korea in any direction. It would be fun to watch Great Leader's face as that happened.

08 Dec 2012 01:50 PM
MagnesDrachen     
And they will attempt to do so with 20 guys throwing it really, REALLY hard.

08 Dec 2012 01:54 PM
signaljammer     
The USA had enormous difficulties developing missiles at first. There is plenty of film that documents this. Design errors of the most fundamental types were committed. This was with the assistance of the murderous paperclip gang. With tech, iterating through one's failures is almost as good as insight.

08 Dec 2012 01:54 PM
7480325115184371z     

Charlie Freak: Nothing to Lose is excellent.


Thank you, I will definitely add that to my reading list.

Fear the Clam: 7480325115184371z: The world...seem to be entirely apathetic about the brutal regime of a few thousand that sees millions of people living under the unending fear of torture, execution, and constant famine that has seen millions die and entire generations left malnourished and underdeveloped while a stone's throw away lies arguably the most technologically advanced civilization and city in the world.

You mean like the Soviet Union?


notsureiftroll.jpg

The Soviet Union was constantly discussed in American politics for decades and was the great boogeyman for a few generations of people. It was almost constantly at the forefront of political debates and discussions when the topic of world politics came up.

Best Korea seems to be continually swept under the rug by American politicians and the major media outlets (political leanings aside), unless it is to either mock their saber-rattling, or elicit fear from Americans on the topic of WMDs (which are two stances that seem to be at odds with one another, but hey advertisers need ratings). I can't remember the last time any serious discussion was had by politicians about the situation in the Korean peninsula.

I mean they have a political orgy anytime the topic of Afghanistan comes up, an isolated region of the planet where 15% of the GDP in 2011 was the result of opium production (after a decade of U.S. involvement). But they seem completely uninterested in Best Korea which is located 50km from Seoul and one of the worlds major suppliers of high-tech components and devices.

Sure the argument can be made that Afghanistan was a breeding ground for terrorists, although all that really seems to have happened is that it has been pushed into Pakistan. What was worth bombing a country of rubble and archaic infrastructure into more rubble, invading, losing 2,000 troops, and seeing the country still produce opium by the boatload after a decade of involvement? Then there's Best Korea, which if it imploded or if an escalation occurs, could threaten the worlds supply of high-tech components and devices used in everything from cell phones to medical devices.

Is there a pragmatic explanation for the continual involvement in Afghanistan? Not a single one of the 9/11 hijackers came from Afghanistan or Iraq. At least with Iraq there's the "oil" justification since every other explanation is kind of laughable, but what's the point of Afghanistan? Why bother with that when there's an actual problem that has the potential to shiat in everyone's Cheerios if ignored?

08 Dec 2012 01:58 PM
Noah_Tall     
NK will successfully launch their missile the 21st. It will land on target and detonate. The first and probably last nuclear war will have begun.


/the Mayans were right

08 Dec 2012 02:12 PM
Wrencher     

7480325115184371z: Charlie Freak: Nothing to Lose is excellent.

Thank you, I will definitely add that to my reading list.

Fear the Clam: 7480325115184371z: The world...seem to be entirely apathetic about the brutal regime of a few thousand that sees millions of people living under the unending fear of torture, execution, and constant famine that has seen millions die and entire generations left malnourished and underdeveloped while a stone's throw away lies arguably the most technologically advanced civilization and city in the world.

You mean like the Soviet Union?

notsureiftroll.jpg

The Soviet Union was constantly discussed in American politics for decades and was the great boogeyman for a few generations of people. It was almost constantly at the forefront of political debates and discussions when the topic of world politics came up.

Best Korea seems to be continually swept under the rug by American politicians and the major media outlets (political leanings aside), unless it is to either mock their saber-rattling, or elicit fear from Americans on the topic of WMDs (which are two stances that seem to be at odds with one another, but hey advertisers need ratings). I can't remember the last time any serious discussion was had by politicians about the situation in the Korean peninsula.

I mean they have a political orgy anytime the topic of Afghanistan comes up, an isolated region of the planet where 15% of the GDP in 2011 was the result of opium production (after a decade of U.S. involvement). But they seem completely uninterested in Best Korea which is located 50km from Seoul and one of the worlds major suppliers of high-tech components and devices.

Sure the argument can be made that Afghanistan was a breeding ground for terrorists, although all that really seems to have happened is that it has been pushed into Pakistan. What was worth bombing a country of rubble and archaic infrastructure into more rubble, invading, losing 2,000 troops, and seeing the country still produce opium by the boatload after a decade of involvement? Then there's Best Korea, which if it imploded or if an escalation occurs, could threaten the worlds supply of high-tech components and devices used in everything from cell phones to medical devices.

Is there a pragmatic explanation for the continual involvement in Afghanistan? Not a single one of the 9/11 hijackers came from Afghanistan or Iraq. At least with Iraq there's the "oil" justification since every other explanation is kind of laughable, but what's the point of Afghanistan? Why bother with that when there's an actual problem that has the potential to shiat in everyone's Cheerios if ignored?


Because Afghanistan has major mineral deposits. We keep the locals busy while China digs.

08 Dec 2012 02:13 PM
7480325115184371z     

Wrencher: Because Afghanistan has major mineral deposits. We keep the locals busy while China digs.


Hmm, I was completely unaware of magnitude of recent discoveries. Google has rectified that shortcoming. What a fascinating development.

http://www.livescience.com/16315-rare -earth-elements-afghanistan.html

The article seems to imply this was only a recent discovery though. It works as an "after the fact" justification, but I still don't see how that applies as a justification for the previous decade.

08 Dec 2012 02:21 PM
Oznog     

scotchcrotch: "Anywhere" meaning a random spot in the ocean


But that random spot can be ANYWHERE!!!

08 Dec 2012 02:26 PM
Anastacya    [TotalFark]  

7480325115184371z: On a somewhat related note that would probably have come up anyway, I'm curious what the most realistic scenario is for the future of "Best Korea".

The world, particularly America, China and Russia, seem to be entirely apathetic about the brutal regime of a few thousand that sees millions of people living under the unending fear of torture, execution, and constant famine that has seen millions die and entire generations left malnourished and underdeveloped while a stone's throw away lies arguably the most technologically advanced civilization and city in the world.

How does the whole thing end? Is there a plausible non-military solution to the dilemma?

I mean it would be an undertaking like East/West Germany, but magnified tenfold. Generations of brainwashed people, millions and millions of starving people, capital investment requirements from the South that would make the German solidarity tax look like a pittance, etc.

I've been meaning to see if there's a recent book written on the topic.


Im not aware of a book that specifically addresses this point, but I do remember reading an article about South Korean perceptions of reunification. What it boiled down to is that South Korea, for all of its programs to integrate North Koreans into society, cannot afford a complete unification. They like the separation and will continue to argue against the regime, if doing nothing overt to end it.

08 Dec 2012 02:30 PM
BlueJay206     
i.imgur.comView Full Size

08 Dec 2012 02:34 PM
7480325115184371z     

Anastacya: Im not aware of a book that specifically addresses this point, but I do remember reading an article about South Korean perceptions of reunification. What it boiled down to is that South Korea, for all of its programs to integrate North Koreans into society, cannot afford a complete unification. They like the separation and will continue to argue against the regime, if doing nothing overt to end it.


I remember reading somewhere that some polls showed a large percentage of young South Koreans want nothing to do with the North whatsoever because the familial bonds that have in the past driven a push towards reunification are shrinking in number and relevancy. The Berlin wall didn't even last 30 years, and the DMZ has been in place going on 60 now.

Definitely eager to check out "Nothing To Lose"

08 Dec 2012 02:39 PM
Anastacya    [TotalFark]  

7480325115184371z: Anastacya: Im not aware of a book that specifically addresses this point, but I do remember reading an article about South Korean perceptions of reunification. What it boiled down to is that South Korea, for all of its programs to integrate North Koreans into society, cannot afford a complete unification. They like the separation and will continue to argue against the regime, if doing nothing overt to end it.

I remember reading somewhere that some polls showed a large percentage of young South Koreans want nothing to do with the North whatsoever because the familial bonds that have in the past driven a push towards reunification are shrinking in number and relevancy. The Berlin wall didn't even last 30 years, and the DMZ has been in place going on 60 now.

Definitely eager to check out "Nothing To Lose"


I have read a lot of books lately about North Korea. There is also a new news aggregator website devoted to Best Korea. I just finished "Nothing to Envy". GREAT book, well-written and informative.

If you have any other books that you can recommend, I have been devouring them lately. North Korea has captured my interest for some reason. EIP.

08 Dec 2012 02:46 PM
Charlie Freak    [TotalFark]  
748lotsofnumbers: Totally meant Nothing to Envy by Barbara Demick. I blame being way sick, been doing shiat like this all day.

08 Dec 2012 02:46 PM
Anastacya    [TotalFark]  

Charlie Freak: 748lotsofnumbers: Totally meant Nothing to Envy by Barbara Demick. I blame being way sick, been doing shiat like this all day.


Yea, I figured that too, lol. I am toying with "The Aquariums of Pyongyang", and then there is that one book about the kid who escaped from prison camp 14. I was pretty sure that I was going to buy it, but then I read a few articles about how the kid lied to the author who wrote the novel. Not lied as in "he never came from the prison" or "created scenarios that never happened", but in regards to the death of his mother. IIRC, originally he said that he saw his mother and brother die (they were hung in the field next to their living quarters). He said that they were caught stealing food.

He came out later (after he lived in California for a while) and said "I killed them". As my memory serves, he woke up in the middle of the night and overheard his mother and brother plotting an escape. The culture of the camp is to be a snitch: if he didn't report that he heard the plot and the guards found out, he would be killed too. This is where the plot thickens: he ratted out his mother and brother. Originally he said the he had nothing to do with it. It was his fault that they were killed. As a bonus, his father told him that he did a great job.

It is important to note that 1) he was born in the prison camp- a reward to his "parents" from the guards... they were "married" and allowed to have sex - the end result was him and his brother. 2) there was no love from his parents or his brother... to be blunt, they were competition. He had to compete with them for food and basic necessities for survival. The concept of familial love was (and still is, as of the article I read) never part of the equation.

Oh well, I am droning on. I can't remember the name of the book... Escape from Camp 14? Maybe?

//tl;dr
///slashies!

08 Dec 2012 03:03 PM
Oznog     

7480325115184371z: Anastacya: Im not aware of a book that specifically addresses this point, but I do remember reading an article about South Korean perceptions of reunification. What it boiled down to is that South Korea, for all of its programs to integrate North Koreans into society, cannot afford a complete unification. They like the separation and will continue to argue against the regime, if doing nothing overt to end it.

I remember reading somewhere that some polls showed a large percentage of young South Koreans want nothing to do with the North whatsoever because the familial bonds that have in the past driven a push towards reunification are shrinking in number and relevancy. The Berlin wall didn't even last 30 years, and the DMZ has been in place going on 60 now.

Definitely eager to check out "Nothing To Lose"


It's true those familial relations of those separated in the ORIGINAL Korean War during their lifetimes are dying out, leaving only relations between people who have never met.

However, there are a substantial number of people who have defected from North Korea. Well, "defected" implies they were high-up to begin with, and that's usually not the case. There's a significant flow of people who cross the northern border into China. Many just do it to earn some money in China and come back to their family, but some leave for good, and find a boat to carry them into S. Korea for refugee status (China will arrest them and send them back to N. Korea where they'll probably be imprisoned or shot immediately).

N. Korean refugee status isn't highly regarded in S. Korea. They get an "allowance" but don't trust them, and for good reason, N. Korea DOES pass off spies and assassins as refugees. They particularly want to target N. Korean defectors who criticize the regime. But there's been 24,000 refugees who fled to S. Korea since the Korean War, and supposedly another 20K-30K refugees hiding in China.

08 Dec 2012 03:06 PM
Charlie Freak    [TotalFark]  
That sounds right.

08 Dec 2012 03:07 PM
Oznog     

Charlie Freak: 748lotsofnumbers: Totally meant Nothing to Envy by Barbara Demick. I blame being way sick, been doing shiat like this all day.


*Nothing To Envy* is a remarkable work, but be aware that even thought it was written in 2009, much of it is from interviews about shiat that happened in the 80's and 90's. Many things HAVE changed since then in N. Korea. Not that you can honestly say it's "better" but the situation has changed.

Just pay attention to the timeline. Some stuff in NTE is much closer to "current" than others. There's also any number of videos on YouTube showing more current info than that.

Actually the part which is interesting to me is how society in that situation CAN change. I mean it's not surprising that you have this sort of cruelty, oppression, and nationalism. I've always been a realist and understood people CAN and DO do this sort of thing to one another.

Rather, the useful part is how people and society can react, change, and recover from this sort of shiat. For example, it didn't take much to shatter the belief that N. Korean life is far better than the outside world. They started importing soap operas and even though it's broadly fictionalized, the N. Korean people weren't stupid and could tell this wasn't the vaguely savage world they'd been told about. And yet it's understood you don't talk about that, it's just like yeah that's all fine and dandy but you've gotta say "Support The Troops!".

08 Dec 2012 03:20 PM
nerdlette     
Escape from Camp 14 is a great book. You realize that there are many, many people being brought up without ever learning things like love, even from your own mother, sharing, community, etc. The guy who escaped (who had been born in the gulag) has massive issues to overcome apart from the obvious economic and nutritional ones - he has to learn what a friend is, that people can look out for him for altruistic reasons, how to trust, what love is. Absolutely fascinating.

Would like to know of any new news aggregator sites about Best Korea. It is an addictive topic.

08 Dec 2012 03:21 PM
Jon iz teh kewl     

Noah_Tall: NK will successfully launch their missile the 21st. It will land on target and detonate. The first and probably last nuclear war will have begun.


/the Mayans were right


it's not a missile but a SATELLITE
yah know one of those space doohickeys

/nothing to see here

08 Dec 2012 03:25 PM
Oatworm     
The problem with the DPRK is nobody can really afford for it to change. The DPRK's leaders will get strung up, Ceaucescu-style, if they loosen the reigns up. The Chinese can't afford to have millions of refugees materialize in Manchuria, nor can they afford to let the DPRK become yet another industrial competitor with cheaper labor. South Korea certainly can't afford to integrate the DPRK into one Korea, neither economically nor culturally - imagine if the Deep South left the US in 1952 and hit the "pause" button, culturally and economically. Now imagine how reintegration would go down for both sides. You think northern African-Americans are going to have much to say to illiterate sharecroppers, or vice-versa? Or how about what happens when rural Mississippians see their first Gay Pride parade, or what happens when people in the north see their first lynching on TV?

I don't know what's going to happen, but it's not going to be pretty.

08 Dec 2012 03:44 PM
buckler     

Jon iz teh kewl: Noah_Tall: NK will successfully launch their missile the 21st. It will land on target and detonate. The first and probably last nuclear war will have begun.


/the Mayans were right

it's not a missile but a SATELLITE
yah know one of those space doohickeys

/nothing to see here


I understand a large portion of the national budget went towards the enormous amount of string needed to communicate with it.

08 Dec 2012 03:48 PM
Jon iz teh kewl     
what's next? Dear Leader brand GPS units??

08 Dec 2012 03:50 PM
Betep     
media.smithsonianmag.comView Full Size


"I can make North Korean missiles do a 180-degree U-turn and go right back to their point of origin," he promised during a 2007 election." Dr. Naka Mats.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science- nature/Dr-Nakamats-the-Man-With- 3300-Patents-to-His-Name-179976641.htm l#ixzz2EUrNHrLB
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

08 Dec 2012 04:06 PM
KarmicDisaster    [TotalFark]  
Now they are saying that there might be a deray.

08 Dec 2012 04:19 PM
Wrencher     

7480325115184371z: Wrencher: Because Afghanistan has major mineral deposits. We keep the locals busy while China digs.

Hmm, I was completely unaware of magnitude of recent discoveries. Google has rectified that shortcoming. What a fascinating development.

http://www.livescience.com/16315-rare -earth-elements-afghanistan.html

The article seems to imply this was only a recent discovery though. It works as an "after the fact" justification, but I still don't see how that applies as a justification for the previous decade.


Yeah, that applies to why we are still there only. "Turrurists!" Was the reason given at the start. War profits was/is the reality.

08 Dec 2012 04:27 PM
OnlyM3     

7480325115184371z
2012-12-08 12:35:06 PM

On a somewhat related note that would probably have come up anyway, I'm curious what the most realistic scenario is for the future of "Best Korea".

The world, particularly America, China and Russia, seem to be entirely apathetic about the brutal regime of a few thousand that sees millions of people living under the unending fear of torture, execution, and constant famine that has seen millions die and entire generations left malnourished

Yeah, China would be real worried about something like that.

08 Dec 2012 06:32 PM
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