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   Scientists use modified HIV virus to cure cancer. Still no hover cars

10 Dec 2012 11:02 AM   |   10218 clicks   |   The New York Times
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Cythraul     
The treatment very nearly killed her.

Hard core.

10 Dec 2012 08:55 AM
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Nofun     
My mind immediately went to I Am Legend when reading the Fark title. Excellent news though!

10 Dec 2012 10:27 AM
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Nofun     
After reading the article, this sort of treatment could possibly be used against viruses too, by reprogramming T-cells as dedicated hunter-killers against a specific viral strain. The ability to implant millions of them immediately means you could treat patients already infected (as opposed to a vaccine).

Very cool premise.

10 Dec 2012 10:36 AM
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lennavan    [TotalFark]  

Nofun: After reading the article, this sort of treatment could possibly be used against viruses too, by reprogramming T-cells as dedicated hunter-killers against a specific viral strain. The ability to implant millions of them immediately means you could treat patients already infected (as opposed to a vaccine).


I'm missing something here. That's how your immune system already works, becoming dedicated hunter-killers against specific virus strains. Why would you take the time and effort to purify the T cells, genetically engineer them and re-inject them when your body does a much better job of it already?

10 Dec 2012 10:57 AM
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FirstNationalBastard    [TotalFark]  
And to cure the HIV, They're going to use Ebola, right?

10 Dec 2012 10:59 AM
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Arkanaut     
What if I have cancer-AIDS?

10 Dec 2012 11:02 AM
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WizardofToast     

FirstNationalBastard: And to cure the HIV, They're going to use Ebola, right?


And to cure Ebola, the smallpox.

10 Dec 2012 11:03 AM
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GardenWeasel     

WizardofToast: FirstNationalBastard: And to cure the HIV, They're going to use Ebola, right?

And to cure Ebola, the smallpox.


Eventually we will get to gorillas, then winter.

10 Dec 2012 11:05 AM
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ChrisDe     
So now Fark headlines are "Yadda, yadda, yadda, still no cure for the common cold"?

10 Dec 2012 11:06 AM
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No Time To Explain     
Next week, we use cancer to cure HIV

/then it'll all come full circle

10 Dec 2012 11:06 AM
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lennavan    [TotalFark]  

Arkanaut: What if I have cancer-AIDS?


You're not alone. Link

10 Dec 2012 11:07 AM
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ghall3    [TotalFark]  

lennavan: I'm missing something here. That's how your immune system already works, becoming dedicated hunter-killers against specific virus strains. Why would you take the time and effort to purify the T cells, genetically engineer them and re-inject them when your body does a much better job of it already?


Except when it doesn't work. Like with cancer, or with viruses that your body can't eliminate....

Can the modified HIV hunt down HIV?

10 Dec 2012 11:10 AM
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Mcavity     
Doctor : I have good news and bad news
Cancer patient : um ok?
Doctor : We cured your cancer!
Cancer patient : WOW! Great! whats the bad news?

...

10 Dec 2012 11:10 AM
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FirstNationalBastard    [TotalFark]  

WizardofToast: FirstNationalBastard: And to cure the HIV, They're going to use Ebola, right?

And to cure Ebola, the smallpox.


Smallpox? Cured with Polio.

10 Dec 2012 11:10 AM
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Prolefeed     

lennavan: Arkanaut: What if I have cancer-AIDS?

You're not alone. Link


www.explosm.net

10 Dec 2012 11:12 AM
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cgraves67     
Oh, nice. I guess AIDS has the right acronym after all.

10 Dec 2012 11:12 AM
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tillerman35     

lennavan: Nofun: After reading the article, this sort of treatment could possibly be used against viruses too, by reprogramming T-cells as dedicated hunter-killers against a specific viral strain. The ability to implant millions of them immediately means you could treat patients already infected (as opposed to a vaccine).

I'm missing something here. That's how your immune system already works, becoming dedicated hunter-killers against specific virus strains. Why would you take the time and effort to purify the T cells, genetically engineer them and re-inject them when your body does a much better job of it already?


I had the same thought, but then shrugged it off because apparently if the body was already doing a better job the patients wouldn't be sick. Also, I figured scientists just liked genetically engineering stuff because it's cool. The fact that it actually cures something is icing on the cake. Today cancer-killing HIV, tomorrow sharkoctoplatypussbearcrabs.

10 Dec 2012 11:13 AM
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Felgraf     

lennavan: I'm missing something here. That's how your immune system already works, becoming dedicated hunter-killers against specific virus strains. Why would you take the time and effort to purify the T cells, genetically engineer them and re-inject them when your body does a much better job of it already?


Except I imagine the body sometimes has a harder time of identifying cancers when it comes to the hunter-killer T-Cells, since for the most part, the cancer IS the body. Just a bit of it going bugnuts. So the reprogramming may be necessary to get the T-Cells to attack the cancer.

I would not be surprised if this treatment method leads to some auto-immune issues, but it's a hell of a lot better than dying of cancer.

10 Dec 2012 11:15 AM
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TheCity     

10 Dec 2012 11:16 AM
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DrowningLessons    [TotalFark]  
I dunno why she swallowed the flu ...

10 Dec 2012 11:17 AM
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maddermaxx     

Cythraul: The treatment very nearly killed her.

Hard core.


That makes it sound like every episode of House M.D. ever.

10 Dec 2012 11:19 AM
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dj_spanmaster     
Next up: "Still no warp drive."

10 Dec 2012 11:20 AM
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juggs     
Next week, we use cancer to cure HIV


I attended a lecture by Dr. June just a few weeks ago and they are using a similar concept to fight AIDS, too. Take some T-cells out, knock out the gene that codes for the (sometimes missing anyway) target surface protein for HIV attachment and put them back in. All for neighborhood of the cost of a year's worth of antiretrovirals. Personalized cell therapy will change the way we approach a lot of horrible diseases.

10 Dec 2012 11:22 AM
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lennavan    [TotalFark]  

Felgraf: Except I imagine the body sometimes has a harder time of identifying cancers when it comes to the hunter-killer T-Cells, since for the most part, the cancer IS the body.


ghall3: Except when it doesn't work. Like with cancer


We were talking about viruses. I get the cancer bit.

This technique seems to teach your immune system what to target. I don't see how the ability to teach your immune system what to target will get us any further with viruses. I do know some about viruses and I'm actually currently working on curing cancer (well a very specific one) and no I'm not using HIV.

10 Dec 2012 11:22 AM
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Cythraul     

juggs: Next week, we use cancer to cure HIV


I attended a lecture by Dr. June just a few weeks ago and they are using a similar concept to fight AIDS, too. Take some T-cells out, knock out the gene that codes for the (sometimes missing anyway) target surface protein for HIV attachment and put them back in. All for neighborhood of the cost of a year's worth of antiretrovirals. Personalized cell therapy will change the way we approach a lot of horrible diseases.


Can it get rid of my herpes? I'm tired of getting phone calls a week later.

10 Dec 2012 11:23 AM
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No Time To Explain     

juggs: Next week, we use cancer to cure HIV


I attended a lecture by Dr. June just a few weeks ago and they are using a similar concept to fight AIDS, too. Take some T-cells out, knock out the gene that codes for the (sometimes missing anyway) target surface protein for HIV attachment and put them back in. All for neighborhood of the cost of a year's worth of antiretrovirals. Personalized cell therapy will change the way we approach a lot of horrible diseases.


It's one of those things like introducing a species such as ladybugs to get aphids and such, only on the genetic/molecular scale, interesting shiat

/something about nature being the folly of man
//go go Godzilla

10 Dec 2012 11:27 AM
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thornhill     

Nofun: After reading the article, this sort of treatment could possibly be used against viruses too, by reprogramming T-cells as dedicated hunter-killers against a specific viral strain.


Isn't that what caused the zombie apocalypse in a few films?

10 Dec 2012 11:29 AM
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lennavan    [TotalFark]  

No Time To Explain: It's one of those things like introducing a species such as ladybugs to get aphids and such, only on the genetic/molecular scale, interesting shiat


It's actually not. I assumed people previously in the thread were just joking. It is more akin to treating your aphid problem by introducing ladybugs that lack the ability to reproduce. So they can come in and eat all the aphids they want but then they'll all die and never become a problem. That's what is referred to here as the "modified" HIV virus.

/Kinda like a "modified" ATM machine or PIN number.

10 Dec 2012 11:30 AM
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Delay    [TotalFark]  

lennavan: Felgraf: Except I imagine the body sometimes has a harder time of identifying cancers when it comes to the hunter-killer T-Cells, since for the most part, the cancer IS the body.

ghall3: Except when it doesn't work. Like with cancer

We were talking about viruses. I get the cancer bit.

This technique seems to teach your immune system what to target. I don't see how the ability to teach your immune system what to target will get us any further with viruses. I do know some about viruses and I'm actually currently working on curing cancer (well a very specific one) and no I'm not using HIV.


Yes, in this case CD-19. Many nasty viruses have poor fidelity RNA polymerases. The antigenic drift allows variants to escape the immune system's available T-cell repertoire. Once that happens, the variants grow preferentially.

10 Dec 2012 11:31 AM
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skullkrusher     
Good news! You're cancer free!
Bad news... you have the HIV

10 Dec 2012 11:32 AM
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MycroftHolmes     

Nofun: After reading the article, this sort of treatment could possibly be used against viruses too, by reprogramming T-cells as dedicated hunter-killers against a specific viral strain. The ability to implant millions of them immediately means you could treat patients already infected (as opposed to a vaccine).

Very cool premise.


Well, I think the main issue is identifying the foreign body, so you would need something that would allow your body to recognize the virus's as something that the immune system could attack, like maybe a weakened or sterilized version of the virus's protein shell, so that the T-cells could be programmed to attack the live viruses. Then we could replace vaccines with a solution that contained these attenuated versions of the live virus, so that the immune system could attack the virus.

10 Dec 2012 11:33 AM
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cherryl taggart     
Just wake me when we can all go back to sex 70's style. I miss the old days.

10 Dec 2012 11:41 AM
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lennavan    [TotalFark]  

Delay: lennavan: Felgraf: Except I imagine the body sometimes has a harder time of identifying cancers when it comes to the hunter-killer T-Cells, since for the most part, the cancer IS the body.

ghall3: Except when it doesn't work. Like with cancer

We were talking about viruses. I get the cancer bit.

This technique seems to teach your immune system what to target. I don't see how the ability to teach your immune system what to target will get us any further with viruses. I do know some about viruses and I'm actually currently working on curing cancer (well a very specific one) and no I'm not using HIV.

Yes, in this case CD-19. Many nasty viruses have poor fidelity RNA polymerases. The antigenic drift allows variants to escape the immune system's available T-cell repertoire. Once that happens, the variants grow preferentially.


Right, my thoughts as well. Which is exactly why this technique would not be good for viruses.

10 Dec 2012 11:42 AM
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No Time To Explain     

lennavan: No Time To Explain: It's one of those things like introducing a species such as ladybugs to get aphids and such, only on the genetic/molecular scale, interesting shiat

It's actually not. I assumed people previously in the thread were just joking. It is more akin to treating your aphid problem by introducing ladybugs that lack the ability to reproduce. So they can come in and eat all the aphids they want but then they'll all die and never become a problem. That's what is referred to here as the "modified" HIV virus.

/Kinda like a "modified" ATM machine or PIN number.


Close enough, but yeah, I know how the procedure works by principle, ladybug analogy was closest that came to mind

10 Dec 2012 11:42 AM
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EggSniper     
This sounds familiar
graphics8.nytimes.com

10 Dec 2012 11:43 AM
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HeWhoHasNoName     

Nofun: My mind immediately went to I Am Legend when reading the Fark title. Excellent news though!


If the Admins really want to leave a fun nugget for digital archeologists somewhere down the line, they need to post the text of the "my name is Robert Neville..." broadcast at the end of this thread and post-date it four years into the future.

10 Dec 2012 11:50 AM
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cleveralthere     
imgs.xkcd.com

glad to see this is being applied and people arent completely freaking out about the genetic engineering aspect of it.

10 Dec 2012 11:52 AM
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Tatterdemalian     

lennavan: I'm missing something here. That's how your immune system already works, becoming dedicated hunter-killers against specific virus strains.


Not quite. Immune systems don't become hunter-killers through exposure, they evolve through random chance. This means that all our immune systems contain triggers for millions of different pathogens, many of which are extinct or don't even exist, and some of which are triggered by allergens that would be harmless if it weren't for being born with an immune system that contains hunter-killers that target peanuts or whatever. In order to develop an immunity to the AIDS virus through evolution, we would have to all be infected by it, and the 99% of the human race whose immune systems couldn't fight off the infection would have to die before they were able to reproduce... which probably wouldn't happen, as an untreated HIV infection acquired by infants from their parents isn't likely to result in death for a good 20 years, easily enough time to reach puberty and have a load of kids.

Those that happen to be immune to the virus will be "blessed" with a much longer lifespan than the other people who drop dead at 20, but that alone isn't enough to spread their genetics, and very likely to hinder them in the chaos that would follow civilizations' collapse, as angry and frustrated people facing their mortality turn to misunderstood medical procedures that end up destroying anything they try to save.

10 Dec 2012 11:52 AM
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The_EliteOne     

Tatterdemalian: lennavan: I'm missing something here. That's how your immune system already works, becoming dedicated hunter-killers against specific virus strains.

Not quite. Immune systems don't become hunter-killers through exposure, they evolve through random chance. This means that all our immune systems contain triggers for millions of different pathogens, many of which are extinct or don't even exist, and some of which are triggered by allergens that would be harmless if it weren't for being born with an immune system that contains hunter-killers that target peanuts or whatever. In order to develop an immunity to the AIDS virus through evolution, we would have to all be infected by it, and the 99% of the human race whose immune systems couldn't fight off the infection would have to die before they were able to reproduce... which probably wouldn't happen, as an untreated HIV infection acquired by infants from their parents isn't likely to result in death for a good 20 years, easily enough time to reach puberty and have a load of kids.

Those that happen to be immune to the virus will be "blessed" with a much longer lifespan than the other people who drop dead at 20, but that alone isn't enough to spread their genetics, and very likely to hinder them in the chaos that would follow civilizations' collapse, as angry and frustrated people facing their mortality turn to misunderstood medical procedures that end up destroying anything they try to save.


Hitting the big 3-0 with HIV this March., had it since birth.

This story pleases me, and if cancer patients needed my HIV cells, I'd gladly donate blood. My grandmother died of lung cancer in July. Gene therapy is the way to go for so many terrible diseases. I'd love to see Big Pharma's internal memo's on these treatments.

10 Dec 2012 12:05 PM
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RugNug     

No Time To Explain: Next week, we use cancer to cure HIV

/then it'll all come full circle


Already been done with a bone marrow transplant.

10 Dec 2012 12:06 PM
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StaleCoffee     
Like anyone is going to give you people cars where more than one crash becomes a necessity of physics.

It only works on Coruscant because it's all automatic navigation. The steering wheels are for Jedi, Bounty Hunters and people who like to pretend.

10 Dec 2012 12:15 PM
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lennavan    [TotalFark]  

Tatterdemalian: Immune systems don't become hunter-killers through exposure, they evolve through random chance.


I think this might be the worst summary of adaptive immunity ever. You're conflating two very different discussions - why people are resistant/immune to HIV and how the adaptive immune system works. People are not resistant to HIV because their immune systems are better at hunting or killing.

10 Dec 2012 12:15 PM
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TypoFlyspray     

juggs: Next week, we use cancer to cure HIV


I attended a lecture by Dr. June just a few weeks ago and they are using a similar concept to fight AIDS, too. Take some T-cells out, knock out the gene that codes for the (sometimes missing anyway) target surface protein for HIV attachment and put them back in. All for neighborhood of the cost of a year's worth of antiretrovirals. Personalized cell therapy will change the way we approach a lot of horrible diseases.


I think the trick with HIV is going to be to figure out how to plug the HIV resistance Mutations (there are two of them) into the appropriate cells. Wouldn't surprise me in the least if they used a macrophage as a vector for the rewritten code. IIRC the way the "cured" Tim Brown (the Berlin Patient. Google is your ally) was to give him a bone marrow transplant from someone who had the correct blood type and both mutations.

10 Dec 2012 12:26 PM
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Deneb81     

The_EliteOne: Tatterdemalian: lennavan: I'm missing something here. That's how your immune system already works, becoming dedicated hunter-killers against specific virus strains.

Not quite. Immune systems don't become hunter-killers through exposure, they evolve through random chance. This means that all our immune systems contain triggers for millions of different pathogens, many of which are extinct or don't even exist, and some of which are triggered by allergens that would be harmless if it weren't for being born with an immune system that contains hunter-killers that target peanuts or whatever. In order to develop an immunity to the AIDS virus through evolution, we would have to all be infected by it, and the 99% of the human race whose immune systems couldn't fight off the infection would have to die before they were able to reproduce... which probably wouldn't happen, as an untreated HIV infection acquired by infants from their parents isn't likely to result in death for a good 20 years, easily enough time to reach puberty and have a load of kids.

Those that happen to be immune to the virus will be "blessed" with a much longer lifespan than the other people who drop dead at 20, but that alone isn't enough to spread their genetics, and very likely to hinder them in the chaos that would follow civilizations' collapse, as angry and frustrated people facing their mortality turn to misunderstood medical procedures that end up destroying anything they try to save.

Hitting the big 3-0 with HIV this March., had it since birth.

This story pleases me, and if cancer patients needed my HIV cells, I'd gladly donate blood. My grandmother died of lung cancer in July. Gene therapy is the way to go for so many terrible diseases. I'd love to see Big Pharma's internal memo's on these treatments.


If I had to guess, they're closely monitoring labs with results for buy-outs so they can own the patents for the technique and make money off the cure.

Same way they do for drugs. Lots of money in cures, regardless it's form.

/and - congrats/condolences

10 Dec 2012 12:27 PM
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TopoGigo     

lennavan: It is more akin to treating your aphid problem by introducing ladybugs that lack the ability to reproduce.


Approves:

encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com

10 Dec 2012 12:30 PM
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etherknot     

Arkanaut: What if I have cancer-AIDS?


Then WebMD gets double the traffic.

/fark AIDScancer ?

10 Dec 2012 12:40 PM
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Tatterdemalian     

lennavan: Tatterdemalian: Immune systems don't become hunter-killers through exposure, they evolve through random chance.

I think this might be the worst summary of adaptive immunity ever. You're conflating two very different discussions - why people are resistant/immune to HIV and how the adaptive immune system works. People are not resistant to HIV because their immune systems are better at hunting or killing.


I see what you did there.

/it would be funny if that rhetorical trick didn't always work
//at least on FARK

10 Dec 2012 12:58 PM
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Contrabulous Flabtraption    [TotalFark]  
AIDS...is there anything it can't do?

10 Dec 2012 01:07 PM
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Jon iz teh kewl     

Contrabulous Flabtraption: AIDS...is there anything it can't do?


prevent forest fires aka rape

10 Dec 2012 01:18 PM
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UseUrHeadFred     
worldofhurtonline.com

10 Dec 2012 01:25 PM
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