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   Aristotle sex manual banned for 200 years to be auctioned. Disappointingly not entitled "Aristotle: Full Throttle"

04 Jan 2013 08:50 AM   |   4998 clicks   |   Short List
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Incorrigible Astronaut    [TotalFark]  
Early HOTY contender. Bravo, subby.

04 Jan 2013 08:52 AM
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MooseUpNorth     
www.mrbillsadventureland.com

Intrigued.
/ Hot like Rule 34ed GIS for Maureen just now.

04 Jan 2013 09:00 AM
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markfara     
Spoiler alert: It's all about buttsex.

04 Jan 2013 09:00 AM
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Dimensio    [TotalFark]  

MooseUpNorth: [www.mrbillsadventureland.com image 250x167]

Intrigued.
/ Hot like Rule 34ed GIS for Maureen just now.


I thought that I was the only Farker who had played that game.

04 Jan 2013 09:02 AM
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unchellmatt     
Of course, Aristotle, Aristotle was a bugger for the bottle.

04 Jan 2013 09:03 AM
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Boudica's War Tampon     

markfara: Spoiler alert: It's all about buttsex.


Spoiler and buttsex never belong in the same sentence. Never.

Any bad night of buttsex is better than...

04 Jan 2013 09:04 AM
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Random Anonymous Blackmail     
Aristotle and the hidden bottle?

04 Jan 2013 09:08 AM
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vonu     
Lucas Arts and the PC peaked right about the same time. Monty Python is classic, classless, and timeless.

04 Jan 2013 09:09 AM
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No Time To Explain     
Subby, you may have just outdid yourself this time

/maybe energy drink named as such
//fark your Viagra, I'm gonna get me assume Aristotle: full throttle
///philosophically phallic

04 Jan 2013 09:10 AM
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Jim.Casy     
After reading the article, I was sad to discover this wasn't actually written by Aristotle :(

My philosophy education could have been so much more...stimulating.

04 Jan 2013 09:10 AM
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Harry Freakstorm    [TotalFark]  
Disappointingly not entitled "Aristotle: Full Throttle"
or "Aristotle: On da Asses"

04 Jan 2013 09:20 AM
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dopekitty74     

Incorrigible Astronaut: Early HOTY contender. Bravo, subby.


Speaking of which, i seem to have missed the results for 2012, can someone please point me the way?

04 Jan 2013 09:20 AM
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Gunny Walker     
Aristotle: Tear A Glottal

04 Jan 2013 09:23 AM
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Harry Freakstorm    [TotalFark]  
dopekitty74
Incorrigible Astronaut: Early HOTY contender. Bravo, subby.

Speaking of which, i seem to have missed the results for 2012, can someone please point me the way?


http://www.fark.com/comments/7511681

04 Jan 2013 09:23 AM
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SageC     
www.rockpapershotgun.com
"Not with my box of bunnies."

04 Jan 2013 09:53 AM
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PirateKing     
His earlier dating manual "Aristotle: Spin the Bottle" didn't sell as well.

04 Jan 2013 10:01 AM
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Dead for Tax Reasons     
Aristotle'll make you waddle

04 Jan 2013 10:06 AM
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cwheelie     
It's all greek to me.
I meant HIM! It's all greek to him!

04 Jan 2013 10:21 AM
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Farker1138     
The proposed title would've meant something quite different back then. Kinky.

04 Jan 2013 10:35 AM
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ObscureNameHere     
I didn't really need to know THAT much about the Allegory of the Cave....

04 Jan 2013 10:37 AM
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MooseUpNorth     

Dimensio: I thought that I was the only Farker who had played that game.


Not only played the hell out of it, mail ordered the CD the soundtrack was based on. (And got a high-quality thin lucasarts-in-its-prime-logo mouse-pad that only wore out last year.)

/ Later got the Gone Jackals' third album, too.

04 Jan 2013 10:46 AM
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Precision Boobery     

Dead for Tax Reasons: Aristotle'll make you waddle


You might even call it a toddle.
His lovers he does not coddle.

04 Jan 2013 11:24 AM
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Mock26     
Meh, every position is just a variation of Greek. Wait. I mean, "Woohoo! Every position is a variation of Greek!"

04 Jan 2013 12:33 PM
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Thudfark     
Lube in the wind. All we are is lube in the wind. Sorry that was Socrates

04 Jan 2013 02:04 PM
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grimlock1972     
Aphrodite applauds subby's shenanigans.

04 Jan 2013 02:24 PM
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brantgoose    [TotalFark]  
I saw one of these in one of the better old bookstores in town.

They were published well into the 1800s and possibly even the early 1900s. They were not written by Aristotle, but since he had his name on many dull books of philosophy and proto-science, his name came to be used on early "sex manuals" for married couples who were still mystified about the facts of life, venereal disease, and sexual disfunctions.

You could put them on your private bookshelves without too much worry that snoops and children would ever give them more than a glance.

In the book business, many things are not what they seem. A lot of scurrious or poltiically-incorrect literature was bound into books of sermons for the same reason. It would be a hard-core believer who ever bothered to look at a book of old sermons. In fact, the only people who ever touch an edition of old sermons is clergymen who are looking for sermons they can steal and claim as their own.

When the dustjacket was invented, early in the 1800s, it came to be used to disguise the real contents of books. I have a couple of books with double covers. On one side is the real title, on the other is a fake title that is guaranteed to cause little interest or curiosity.

One fine example is a little satire written about Hitler during World War II. Entitled The Flying Visit, it has Hitler parachuting into England to negotiate a peace and how he is greeted by the locals, namely with ill-concealed disinterest. Because the topic was a bit touchy, it was published with a fake cover that could be used to conceal the contents from prying eyes.

I could go on and on but there are plenty of books on the subject of weird books and weird book customs and book lovers, so you can easily do your own research or ask a librarian for some suggestions.

By the way, sex manuals were not necessarily banned in all times and places where Aristotle's name was borrowed by authors, but people have always been embarassed by certain types of reading, so these manuals were quite popular. Some of their authors probably knew less about how sex really worked than Aristotle himself, who did in fact write a book or two on the sex lives of animals.

Personally I prefer the real Aristole to the pseudo-Aristotles, although the latter may be funnier.

04 Jan 2013 03:32 PM
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Jon iz teh kewl     
bath salts

05 Jan 2013 12:31 PM
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pute kisses like a man     

brantgoose: I saw one of these in one of the better old bookstores in town.

They were published well into the 1800s and possibly even the early 1900s. They were not written by Aristotle, but since he had his name on many dull books of philosophy and proto-science, his name came to be used on early "sex manuals" for married couples who were still mystified about the facts of life, venereal disease, and sexual disfunctions.

You could put them on your private bookshelves without too much worry that snoops and children would ever give them more than a glance.

In the book business, many things are not what they seem. A lot of scurrious or poltiically-incorrect literature was bound into books of sermons for the same reason. It would be a hard-core believer who ever bothered to look at a book of old sermons. In fact, the only people who ever touch an edition of old sermons is clergymen who are looking for sermons they can steal and claim as their own.

When the dustjacket was invented, early in the 1800s, it came to be used to disguise the real contents of books. I have a couple of books with double covers. On one side is the real title, on the other is a fake title that is guaranteed to cause little interest or curiosity.

One fine example is a little satire written about Hitler during World War II. Entitled The Flying Visit, it has Hitler parachuting into England to negotiate a peace and how he is greeted by the locals, namely with ill-concealed disinterest. Because the topic was a bit touchy, it was published with a fake cover that could be used to conceal the contents from prying eyes.

I could go on and on but there are plenty of books on the subject of weird books and weird book customs and book lovers, so you can easily do your own research or ask a librarian for some suggestions.

By the way, sex manuals were not necessarily banned in all times and places where Aristotle's name was borrowed by authors, but people have always been embarassed by certain types of reading, so t ...


heh... my mom used to call certain books "bookcover books"

I was reading bataille's the story of the eye. I had absolutely no expectation that my mom would be familiar with the book. needless to say, when she noticed what I was reading, she exasperated, and said, that's a bookcover book, no one needs to know you're reading that.

/ awkward.

07 Jan 2013 02:09 PM
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