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   National Grid charged $270,000 late payment penalty

07 Jan 2013 03:42 PM   |   9023 clicks   |   Boston Herald
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jayphat     
Good. I understand, shiat happens. But when you drag crap like this on because a "glitch" won't let you pay, well as a government regulated company, you're gonna get your ass spanked. Although, if I was the AG and they just told me they were using Kronos, I would have let them off with a "oh well that figures"

07 Jan 2013 03:45 PM
FarkinHostile     
I farking HATE National Grid, but unless I want to build a windmill or some other alternative energy source, they are the only game in town.

I'd switch in a heartbeat if there was a reasonable alternative.

07 Jan 2013 03:46 PM
MBooda     
Oh heavenly Grid, help us bear up thy Standard, our Chevron flashing bright across the Gulf of Compromise, standing Humble on the Rich Field of Mobile American thinking, here in this Shell, we call Life...

07 Jan 2013 03:51 PM
MetaCarpal     
National Grid isn't all bad. They were jackhammering holes in the street on my block for two weeks straight up until Sandy hit.

I presume it was to give the water someplace to drain.

07 Jan 2013 03:52 PM
Geotpf     
I have socialized electricity in my city (Riverside, California). They do pretty darned good, IMHO. Of course, we don't have hurricanes out here.

07 Jan 2013 03:52 PM
Brian Ryanberger     
Don't like the Free Market, do you liberals? Who will pay to put your power back on once you have bankrupted the government with your welfare handouts?

07 Jan 2013 03:52 PM
Kludge     

Brian Ryanberger: Don't like the Free Market, do you liberals? Who will pay to put your power back on once you have bankrupted the government with your welfare handouts?


Farkin' Poe's Law man.

07 Jan 2013 03:55 PM
Harvey Manfrenjensenjen     

jayphat: Good. I understand, shiat happens. But when you drag crap like this on because a "glitch" won't let you pay, well as a government regulated company, you're gonna get your ass spanked. Although, if I was the AG and they just told me they were using Kronos, I would have let them off with a "oh well that figures"


It's the 21st century, there is no good reason why a company can't figure out how to pay its employees. Blaming "the computer system" is BS; the system is in place to support policy decisions made by management. They either had a very poor business requirements process, and/or were too worried about putting in measures to prevent employees from being overpaid. Backend operations are always overlooked because it's hard to present an ROI calculation until one day you wake up faced with a fine ten times what it would have cost to just do it right the first time. I think many of the "hardship" cases are also BS, but I have no problem with the fines simply being for sheer incompetence.

07 Jan 2013 03:55 PM
ameeriklane     

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: Blaming "the computer system" is BS; the system is in place to support policy decisions made by management.


I agree. On top of that, it sounds like the issue surfaced in December. I bet everyone in the payroll division was allowed to take their 1-2 weeks off instead of being required to stay at work until the problem is fixed.

07 Jan 2013 04:04 PM
Maul555     
But we dont have a national power grid. We have 3 power grids in the lower 48. Texas, The east, and the West...

www.earthlyissues.comView Full Size


Are they not breaking some truth in advertising laws?

/not really serious

07 Jan 2013 04:08 PM
jayphat     

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: jayphat: Good. I understand, shiat happens. But when you drag crap like this on because a "glitch" won't let you pay, well as a government regulated company, you're gonna get your ass spanked. Although, if I was the AG and they just told me they were using Kronos, I would have let them off with a "oh well that figures"

It's the 21st century, there is no good reason why a company can't figure out how to pay its employees. Blaming "the computer system" is BS; the system is in place to support policy decisions made by management. They either had a very poor business requirements process, and/or were too worried about putting in measures to prevent employees from being overpaid. Backend operations are always overlooked because it's hard to present an ROI calculation until one day you wake up faced with a fine ten times what it would have cost to just do it right the first time. I think many of the "hardship" cases are also BS, but I have no problem with the fines simply being for sheer incompetence.


Can I get you to go work for the SEC, cause I'm sick as shiat of reading about banks paying fines to settle suits they broke the law, when those fines are 1/10th what the probably profited from the breaking the law AND they have to admit no wrong doing? That sounds more like protection payments run by the mafia than fines levied by a government organization.

07 Jan 2013 04:08 PM
deforge     
i've been trying to PAY my national grid bill since November. their shiate of a website cant stay connected long enough to process a payment transaction. of course they offer a convenient "alterntaive" to pay via WU conveniently for a fee, but fark that.

07 Jan 2013 04:11 PM
ds394     
I wonder where the $270k in penalty money goes. Let's look at the story:

1. Workers get penalized by banks/alimony/child payment requirements when the company doesn't pay them.
2. Government steps up to help the workers and issues $270k in penalties.
3. Workers are excited because they... oh wait... where did that money go?
4. Government smiles and adds 270k to coffers.
5. Workers still are behind on banks/alimony/child payment. Get penalized more.
6. National Grid increases rates because of $270k penalties.

End game:
Government: 1
National Grid: 0 (no net loss or gain; they paid money and then increased charges)
Worker Bee: -1 (penalty fees from banks, etc.)
Customers: -1 (higher rates)

Does anyone else think there's a problem?

07 Jan 2013 04:11 PM
Marcintosh     
Dan Hurley, Casper Milqutoast head of the union representing National Grid's Bay State workers, applauded the AG's move, but stressed that the problems still exist.

"This issue highlights a systematic failure of the company and its management team, a theme that unfortunately this state and ratepayers have become all too familiar with," Hurley Milqutoast said in a statement. "National Grid, a multi-billion dollar company, must pay these hard working men and women - many of who have been working 18 -hour days, 7 days a week. We hope that the Attorney General and others will continue to support our efforts until this issue is completely resolved."

 If that doesn't work he'll whine again.  Where the hell is Hoffa anyway?  Albert Schanker?  These little limp-wristed criminals are acting like mincing sweethearts at the cotillion.   MATEWAN - MATEWAN - MATEWAN

07 Jan 2013 04:27 PM
Fark Rye For Many Whores     

07 Jan 2013 04:35 PM
Marcintosh     

Fark Rye For Many Whores: Yes but what are we talking about:

We are National Grid

National Grid is an international electricity and gas company and one of the largest investor-owned energy companies in the world.


So big that if they can delay paying workers for just one day, they've recouped the losses of the fine.
One more case of "The rich get richer and the poor get kids".  Scumbags.
Does the AG actually think they can't sort this out in a day?
Does the AG actually think they're run by a bunch of bumbling idiots?, Because they aint lemme tell you.
Oh and besides, I wouldn't be a bit surprised if they can ignore / file the cost of the fine as a "business expense"

07 Jan 2013 04:52 PM
Harvey Manfrenjensenjen     

jayphat: Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: jayphat: Good. I understand, shiat happens. But when you drag crap like this on because a "glitch" won't let you pay, well as a government regulated company, you're gonna get your ass spanked. Although, if I was the AG and they just told me they were using Kronos, I would have let them off with a "oh well that figures"

It's the 21st century, there is no good reason why a company can't figure out how to pay its employees. Blaming "the computer system" is BS; the system is in place to support policy decisions made by management. They either had a very poor business requirements process, and/or were too worried about putting in measures to prevent employees from being overpaid. Backend operations are always overlooked because it's hard to present an ROI calculation until one day you wake up faced with a fine ten times what it would have cost to just do it right the first time. I think many of the "hardship" cases are also BS, but I have no problem with the fines simply being for sheer incompetence.

Can I get you to go work for the SEC, cause I'm sick as shiat of reading about banks paying fines to settle suits they broke the law, when those fines are 1/10th what the probably profited from the breaking the law AND they have to admit no wrong doing? That sounds more like protection payments run by the mafia than fines levied by a government organization.


Did I do you wrong in a previous life and/or thread? Why would you wish upon me the fate of being knee-deep in both bankers and bank regulators?

Seriously, though... even though I see it all the time, it still amazes me how civilization manages to progress. Whether it's business or government, you have 20% of the people carrying the weight of 60% who are just middling along and another 20% who are actively trying to sabotage/regress. Makes you wonder how much farther along we'd be if we could even make it to 50/40/10. Stop with the drama and weasel-ness, just do your farking job with a basic level of competence and work ethic and we're all better off. And the US is actually pretty good compared to other places I've worked; in most of the places I've been there is almost no "can-do" attitude, between bureaucracy and a beat-down mindset (little surprise that most were occupied by colonial powers for centuries). People spend more time getting permission to do their job than they do actually doing their job.

Back on the SEC thing, I think many of those settlements are the SEC saying "we really don't have the resources to fight this thing in court for the next eight years, let's get what we can and move on". I think they'd be better-served by eliminating the superfluous regulations (to the extent that they can, I know a lot is mandated by Congress) and prioritizing on the ones with the biggest bang for the buck in terms of impact on the industry. They celebrate victories in Martha Stewart-type cases while the real criminals operate with impunity.

07 Jan 2013 04:53 PM
jayphat     

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: jayphat: Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: jayphat: Good. I understand, shiat happens. But when you drag crap like this on because a "glitch" won't let you pay, well as a government regulated company, you're gonna get your ass spanked. Although, if I was the AG and they just told me they were using Kronos, I would have let them off with a "oh well that figures"

It's the 21st century, there is no good reason why a company can't figure out how to pay its employees. Blaming "the computer system" is BS; the system is in place to support policy decisions made by management. They either had a very poor business requirements process, and/or were too worried about putting in measures to prevent employees from being overpaid. Backend operations are always overlooked because it's hard to present an ROI calculation until one day you wake up faced with a fine ten times what it would have cost to just do it right the first time. I think many of the "hardship" cases are also BS, but I have no problem with the fines simply being for sheer incompetence.

Can I get you to go work for the SEC, cause I'm sick as shiat of reading about banks paying fines to settle suits they broke the law, when those fines are 1/10th what the probably profited from the breaking the law AND they have to admit no wrong doing? That sounds more like protection payments run by the mafia than fines levied by a government organization.

Did I do you wrong in a previous life and/or thread? Why would you wish upon me the fate of being knee-deep in both bankers and bank regulators?

Seriously, though... even though I see it all the time, it still amazes me how civilization manages to progress. Whether it's business or government, you have 20% of the people carrying the weight of 60% who are just middling along and another 20% who are actively trying to sabotage/regress. Makes you wonder how much farther along we'd be if we could even make it to 50/40/10. Stop with the drama and weasel-ness, just do your farking job wi ...


Sir I would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

07 Jan 2013 04:58 PM
special20    [TotalFark]  

Brian Ryanberger: Don't like the Free Market, do you liberals? Who will pay to put your power back on once you have bankrupted the government with your welfare handouts?


The only "welfare handouts" I know of are to big corporations, and rich farks. I would like to see the so called "Free Market" exposed for what it really is; a veil to obscure all the price fixing that is dictated by the Koch brothers.

/troll
//counter troll

07 Jan 2013 05:09 PM
special20    [TotalFark]  

Marcintosh: Fark Rye For Many Whores: Yes but what are we talking about:

We are National Grid

National Grid is an international electricity and gas company and one of the largest investor-owned energy companies in the world.

So big that if they can delay paying workers for just one day, they've recouped the losses of the fine.
One more case of "The rich get richer and the poor get kids".  Scumbags.
Does the AG actually think they can't sort this out in a day?
Does the AG actually think they're run by a bunch of bumbling idiots?, Because they aint lemme tell you.
Oh and besides, I wouldn't be a bit surprised if they can ignore / file the cost of the fine as a "business expense"


Better still - whatever the fines are, they WILL be passed along with rate hikes on the customers.

07 Jan 2013 05:12 PM
The Irresponsible Captain    [TotalFark]  
How about plan B:

bookfool.comView Full Size

07 Jan 2013 05:37 PM
Seige101     
Thank you Martha Farking Coakley. They will just increase the rates to cover your fine increase the rates for having to increase the rates to pay the fine. Because Fark you thats why.

/Masshole 4 life

07 Jan 2013 06:33 PM
foxyshadis     

Marcintosh: Fark Rye For Many Whores: Yes but what are we talking about:

We are National Grid

National Grid is an international electricity and gas company and one of the largest investor-owned energy companies in the world.

So big that if they can delay paying workers for just one day, they've recouped the losses of the fine.
One more case of "The rich get richer and the poor get kids".  Scumbags.
Does the AG actually think they can't sort this out in a day?
Does the AG actually think they're run by a bunch of bumbling idiots?, Because they aint lemme tell you.
Oh and besides, I wouldn't be a bit surprised if they can ignore / file the cost of the fine as a "business expense"


They can be bumbling idiots and greedy psychopaths at the same time. In fact, sometimes that's the best cover for looting the coffers.

07 Jan 2013 07:14 PM
MrSteve007     
Lol. "Privatized" utilities.

I love my dirt cheap electricity, provided by a 1937 Congressional act to create jobs.

Bonneville Power Administration
www.bpa.govView Full Size

Some of the cheapest energy and most reliable grid in the world, @ $0.02 a kWh wholesale. All owned by the taxpayer.

07 Jan 2013 07:45 PM
Tom_Slick     
CSB:

When i got my current cell phone # 7 years ago, I started getting strange phone calls from National Grid about power outages, after a few calls I did an internet search and determined that my # in the 678 area code was the same number as the engineering phone # of a major manufacturing plan in the 687 area code. I informed National Grid of this transposed number in their system but the calls have never stopped. That is some good customer service right there.

/CSB

07 Jan 2013 08:04 PM
fluffy2097     
Here is how you solve the problem.

fine starts at $50,000

Every day you don't fix your shiat, the fine doubles, and is added to all previous fines.

Day one, you owe 50,000.

Day two, you owe 150,000

Day three, you owe 450,000

Then you distribute the money to all the employees of national grid.

07 Jan 2013 10:15 PM
Callous    [TotalFark]  

fluffy2097: Here is how you solve the problem.

fine starts at $50,000

Every day you don't fix your shiat, the fine doubles, and is added to all previous fines.

Day one, you owe 50,000.

Day two, you owe 150,000

Day three, you owe 450,000

Then you distribute the money to all the employees of national grid.


This is Massachusetts, the employees that got screwed and the rate payers that are gonna get screwed will never see a dime.  It's going down the bureaucratic rat-hole that is Beacon Hill.

08 Jan 2013 08:38 AM
fluffy2097     

Callous: This is Massachusetts, the employees that got screwed and the rate payers that are gonna get screwed will never see a dime. It's going down the bureaucratic rat-hole that is Beacon Hill.


I said it's how you solve the problem, not what's going to happen.

08 Jan 2013 12:05 PM
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