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   Two suburban housewives are led away in handcuffs for refusing to let smart meters be hooked to their homes. Carry on, citizen

27 Jan 2013 08:08 AM   |   18913 clicks   |   Breitbart.com
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bunner     
www.examiner.comView Full Size


You'd jail your sisters for refusing to submit to the demands of the wealthy and powerful? I'm impressed, officer.

27 Jan 2013 02:48 AM
This About That    [TotalFark]  
Good grief.

My fellow conspiratorialists: I love the idea that it is only healthy for one to distrust Big Money and Big Gummint, and believe you me I am sensitive to eavesdropping issues and the loss of our personal privacy. But this ain't it. Smart meters allow the power company to do two things:

1. Collect your power bill without sending the meter reader out to your house. This is a tradeoff, from our standpoint, between meter reading jobs and the price of our utility service.

2. It allows the utility to adjust the price in real time against the real time demand, thus allowing us to adjust our usage to make the best use of the energy we buy. Charge the electric car or do the laundry at night. Turn off the air conditioner if everyone is at school or work during the hottest part of the day. Use the energy when it is cheapest. A dumb power meter can't tell the difference, but a smart meter can.

Another little issue is that the utility company really does own the meter and really can do whatever they please with it. Threatening a meter installer is just plain stoopid, and I don't care what your local fearmongers are selling. They aren't always right, as they aren't in this case. The low power RF needed to drive-by read your meter is not going to affect your little bear cubs. Also, if you quote Sarah Palin, you should go to jail in handcuffs.

27 Jan 2013 03:00 AM
bunner     

This About That: 2. It allows the utility to adjust the price in real time against the real time demand,


"Hey, we could have gotten .02 more a kilowatt hr. for that!" "Now we CAN! And tell the meter readers to stay home this year." Yay, progress. So, are these mandatory on commercial accounts, too?

27 Jan 2013 03:20 AM
This About That    [TotalFark]  

bunner: So, are these mandatory on commercial accounts, too?


I don't know for sure, but my guess would be that commercial accounts have higher energy requirements, especially during the daytime, and are less like to shoot a utility employee over RF emanations. So, yeah, probably.

27 Jan 2013 03:35 AM
bunner     

This About That: and are less like to shoot a utility employee


Who got shot?

27 Jan 2013 03:37 AM
Lsherm    [TotalFark]  

This About That: Turn off the air conditioner if everyone is at school or work during the hottest part of the day.


Our house is crazy old (152 years) and it was retrofitted with air-conditioning in 2002.  Since we couldn't run continuous duct work all over the house like you can in a new build, we have three zones and three heat pumps with programmable thermostats.  I made an uncomfortable discovery this summer - if we shut off the air conditioning for the zone that handles the upstairs bedrooms and the temperature goes above 97 that day - the heat pump can't cool down the upstairs overnight.  It tries, but it just can't do it.  The inside temperature upstairs creeps well above 115 even with an attic fan running.

I tried fiddling with the time it was turned off, then I tried leaving it on but setting the temp absurdly high (85 degrees - the highest the thermostat will go), then I bumped it down, and bumped it down, and bumped it down again until we at last got to a point where the overnight temp could drop to at least 75.

The biggest problem is that it's an old farmhouse, so the walls aren't insulated that well and the roof is black-tar painted tin.  I'm getting the roof painted with silver reflective paint this spring, so I hope that takes some of the heat load off the house.

27 Jan 2013 03:41 AM
This About That    [TotalFark]  

Lsherm: The biggest problem is that it's an old farmhouse, so the walls aren't insulated that well and the roof is black-tar painted tin. I'm getting the roof painted with silver reflective paint this spring, so I hope that takes some of the heat load off the house.


I'm a fan of big ol' farmhouses, but insulation didn't seem to be such a big priority back then. Have you investigated how long it would take to recoup the cost of insulation? Hint: Start with the attic.

A whole-house extractor fan would help, too. The extractor pulls the hot air from the upstairs after it cools off outside after dark, and sends it into the attic to displace the even hotter air up there. Open windows downstairs and start it up after dark.

27 Jan 2013 03:56 AM
Lsherm    [TotalFark]  

This About That: A whole-house extractor fan would help, too. The extractor pulls the hot air from the upstairs after it cools off outside after dark, and sends it into the attic to displace the even hotter air up there. Open windows downstairs and start it up after dark.


Yeah, I have one in the attic above the bedrooms.  Once again, the problem is that it's an old farmhouse, so it was built in stages (whenever they needed more room, they just built another room) - so I have 4 attics.

I'm torn about installing vents in the bedroom ceilings to pass air up to the attic to let the fan work better.  It would let the bedrooms cool off faster from the attic fan, but it would be a nightmare in the winter unless I closed them off tight.

This About That: Have you investigated how long it would take to recoup the cost of insulation? Hint: Start with the attic.


That's the thing - the attic above the bedrooms IS insulated.  It has blown insulation between the bedroom ceilings and the attic floor (it's a walk up attic) and rolled thin foil insulation on the floor.  The only other thing I can insulate is the clapboard roof the tin is nailed to, presumably with hard foam insulation, but I'm worried about doing that because it would make water leaks harder to find.  Also, since either end of the attic has a full size 4.5 foot window on it, I'm not sure if it would do any good.  Insulating the attic floor seemed like the best option at some point, and I'm inclined to agree with whoever made that decision.

Here's a picture of the bedroom attic with an inspector and our real estate agent during a walkthrough.  You can see the blown insulation, the back of the tin from the roof, the floorboards, and you can barely make out a window behind the inspector.  The only thing we've added since this picture was taken was foil insulation on top of the floorboards, but it didn't seem to help much.

img802.imageshack.usView Full Size


I'm sure I'll work it out over the next 20 years or so.  What made the house tolerable when it was built - 19 million windows, works against it now.

27 Jan 2013 05:05 AM
Nullav     
People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.

27 Jan 2013 05:08 AM
Slaxl     

Nullav: People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.


"Doctor, doctor! I feel like i'm falling apart",
"I see, must be the smart meter in your house causing your DNA to break down, surprisingly common, yes I can see your arm is turning into some kind of paste."

No one's mentioned it yet, so let me ask. Since this is a Breitbart link how do we know that 1. it's not entirely fabricated, 2. if it's true it's not because the women attacked people?

I'll admit that some of these smart meter installing practices seem a bit shady, but them I'm not fool enough to fail to recognise that all my sources on it are crazy nutjobs who have a vested interest in making their practices seem a bit shady.

27 Jan 2013 06:35 AM
mr_a    [TotalFark]  

Nullav: People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.


My thoughts exactly.

I wonder what percentage of the people calling to complain about the "RF signals" being sent by the meter were using a cell or wireless phone.

27 Jan 2013 06:36 AM
vpb    [TotalFark]  

mr_a: Nullav: People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.

My thoughts exactly.

I wonder what percentage of the people calling to complain about the "RF signals" being sent by the meter were using a cell or wireless phone.


I think it's because RF radiation has "radiation" in it.  They think it's like nuclear fallout of something.

27 Jan 2013 07:15 AM
Mrtraveler01     
Considering the source, am I right to assume that they left out some parts of this story and changed the context of it to suit their worldview?

27 Jan 2013 08:13 AM
Uchiha_Cycliste     

vpb: mr_a: Nullav: People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.

My thoughts exactly.

I wonder what percentage of the people calling to complain about the "RF signals" being sent by the meter were using a cell or wireless phone.

I think it's because RF radiation has "radiation" in it.  They think it's like nuclear fallout of something.


Wouldn't it be so much fun to tell them how much more radiation their wifi routers are TX.

27 Jan 2013 08:14 AM
Mrtraveler01     
And do they know that the electric company already keeps track of how much electricity they use?

Or am I missing the point here.

27 Jan 2013 08:16 AM
HoneyDog     
2. It allows the utility to adjust the price in real time against the real time demand, thus allowing us to adjust our usage to make the best use of the energy we buy. Charge the electric car or do the laundry at night. Turn off the air conditioner if everyone is at school or work during the hottest part of the day. Use the energy when it is cheapest. A dumb power meter can't tell the difference, but a smart meter can.


How do they know if there is nobody in the house? I work from home some days. And what about my dogs? Why should they suffer in the heat?

27 Jan 2013 08:16 AM
mrlewish     
Solution. Solar panels.
Insulated bolt cutters.

27 Jan 2013 08:16 AM
Kyosuke     
<b><a href="http://www.fark.com/comments/755 8700/82146714#c82146714" target="_blank">vpb</a>:</b> <i>mr_a: Nullav: People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

God, I hate that feeling. Do you have any idea how irritating that tingle is, ever time the phone rings? Chromosomal erosion sucks.

My thoughts exactly.

I wonder what percentage of the people calling to complain about the "RF signals" being sent by the meter were using a cell or wireless phone.

I think it's because RF radiation has "radiation" in it.  They think it's like nuclear fallout of something.</i>

Same reason the 'N' in 'NMRI' is often not mentioned.

27 Jan 2013 08:17 AM
Richard C Stanford     
Of course this is from brietfart so anything from it should be taken with 2 grains of salt.
I mean, the site has a tab labeled "Big Peace". What the hell does that even mean?

27 Jan 2013 08:23 AM
Mexican Jew Lizard     
Arresting two people for not having the smart meters is definitely overkill on behalf of the police. Why the two didn't go with the manual meters is beyond me.

I do love how the article points out the meters are "controversial" at least twice. Also, the the stuff about people complaining about "DNA damage" due to the meters is a bit amusing. The other stuff I could understand, but how would you even determine something like that? Send a swab to a lab or something?

Lastly, I have the feeling that Breitbart's team is reporting this because it fits in so well with the "fight big government" thrust of the site, not to mention it's in Chicago.

27 Jan 2013 08:25 AM
Mattbastard     

mrlewish: Solution. Solar panels.
Insulated bolt cutters.


Actually...

media.thereadystore.comView Full Size

Seriously, put it around the meter.

27 Jan 2013 08:25 AM
Mrtraveler01     
I hope that subby is posting this so that we can mock it and not because he actually believes this crap.

27 Jan 2013 08:28 AM
rumpelstiltskin    [TotalFark]  
This sounds like a brave thing to do in Naperville. Regardless of her motives, the gossip around the neighborhood will be that Jenny can't afford the 25 bucks a month to opt out.

27 Jan 2013 08:29 AM
Lochsteppe     

Richard C Stanford: Of course this is from brietfart so anything from it should be taken with 2 grains of salt.
I mean, the site has a tab labeled "Big Peace". What the hell does that even mean?


The peace-industrial complex is notorious for hugging its enemies to death. They're not to be trifled with. Look at Brietblart: he dared to speak truth to their power, and they hugged him to death with cocaine.

27 Jan 2013 08:30 AM
mr_a    [TotalFark]  

27 Jan 2013 08:30 AM
AverageAmericanGuy    [TotalFark]  
When I first moved into my apartment here, I was leaving for work and a woman dressed in the power utility uniform tried to enter the building just as I left. We have an automatic door which requires either a key or someone to buzz you in. She had been standing just outside the door waiting for someone to come out so she could sneak in.

I stopped her and asked her what she was doing trying to sneak in. She said she was coming to check the power meter. Granted the power meters for each apartment are on the inside of the building, and so the power company reader would have to come into the building somehow.

I ushered her back outside and suggested she call the building manager if she wanted access. We waited outside the automatic door until it closed and locked and I left for work. I suppose she stood around the entrance until someone else came out.

I don't have a problem with power meter readers coming in, but I'm certainly not the one to be authorizing that kind of thing for the whole building. If they need to read the meters, they should either have an access key or have an appointment with the manager to let them in. Sneaking in by skulking around the door waiting for people to leave seems really unprofessional and suspicious.

27 Jan 2013 08:31 AM
ghare     

HoneyDog: 2. It allows the utility to adjust the price in real time against the real time demand, thus allowing us to adjust our usage to make the best use of the energy we buy. Charge the electric car or do the laundry at night. Turn off the air conditioner if everyone is at school or work during the hottest part of the day. Use the energy when it is cheapest. A dumb power meter can't tell the difference, but a smart meter can.


How do they know if there is nobody in the house? I work from home some days. And what about my dogs? Why should they suffer in the heat?


Oh, they know. THEY KNOW.

27 Jan 2013 08:31 AM
Kansei     
Just get a decorative, lead-lined box for the smart meter. Take it off for 30 minutes each month so it can do its business.

Link

27 Jan 2013 08:31 AM
A Terrible Human     
Smart meters as in the digital ones? Lolol suuuuuure it's causing you a list of health problems a mile long and I'm the queen of France.

27 Jan 2013 08:32 AM
ghare     

AverageAmericanGuy: When I first moved into my apartment here, I was leaving for work and a woman dressed in the power utility uniform tried to enter the building just as I left. We have an automatic door which requires either a key or someone to buzz you in. She had been standing just outside the door waiting for someone to come out so she could sneak in.

I stopped her and asked her what she was doing trying to sneak in. She said she was coming to check the power meter. Granted the power meters for each apartment are on the inside of the building, and so the power company reader would have to come into the building somehow.

I ushered her back outside and suggested she call the building manager if she wanted access. We waited outside the automatic door until it closed and locked and I left for work. I suppose she stood around the entrance until someone else came out.

I don't have a problem with power meter readers coming in, but I'm certainly not the one to be authorizing that kind of thing for the whole building. If they need to read the meters, they should either have an access key or have an appointment with the manager to let them in. Sneaking in by skulking around the door waiting for people to leave seems really unprofessional and suspicious.


Absolutely Rules are Rules and not to be trifled with. One must always obey The Rules.

27 Jan 2013 08:33 AM
poorjon     
FTFA:
Reports of health risks due to the meter's wireless transmitter's omission of electromagnetic frequencies surfaced in 2011. People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

And that's just what happens when they're not emitting any signals. Imagine what will happen when they turn them on!

27 Jan 2013 08:33 AM
Fuggin Bizzy     

Mexican Jew Lizard: Arresting two people for not having the smart meters is definitely overkill on behalf of the police. Why the two didn't go with the manual meters is beyond me.

I do love how the article points out the meters are "controversial" at least twice. Also, the the stuff about people complaining about "DNA damage" due to the meters is a bit amusing. The other stuff I could understand, but how would you even determine something like that? Send a swab to a lab or something?

Lastly, I have the feeling that Breitbart's team is reporting this because it fits in so well with the "fight big government" thrust of the site, not to mention it's in Chicago.


Chicago?!? ZOMG community organization darkies Islam murder rate!!1!

27 Jan 2013 08:33 AM
ZackDanger     

HoneyDog: 2. It allows the utility to adjust the price in real time against the real time demand, thus allowing us to adjust our usage to make the best use of the energy we buy. Charge the electric car or do the laundry at night. Turn off the air conditioner if everyone is at school or work during the hottest part of the day. Use the energy when it is cheapest. A dumb power meter can't tell the difference, but a smart meter can.


How do they know if there is nobody in the house? I work from home some days. And what about my dogs? Why should they suffer in the heat?


Huh?

Electricity is cheaper at night. A smart reader knows *when* you are using electricity, so they can change the rates based on overall demand in the system. (A little cheaper at night, a little more expensive during the day for example.) There are in fact power/profit generation plants that operate on this principal alone.

http://www.firstlightpower.com/genera tion/north.asp

If you want to keep your AC on during the day, that's your prerogative.

27 Jan 2013 08:34 AM
Mrtraveler01     

mr_a: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/20 13-01-24/news/chi-naperville-sma r t-meter-arrest-20130123_1_meter-oppone nts-smart-meter-wireless-meters

Seems legit.  And Jenny seems hot.

//not subby


FTFA:

Two vocal opponents of Naperville's initiative to install wireless electric meters on homes were arrested after interfering with the installation process, according to city officials.

This is a city ordinance they're fighting against? It's not even a Federal or State Law they're protesting? So why is Breitbart biatching?

Jesus Christ, just move to Aurora, Plainfield, or Joliet already and STFU.

27 Jan 2013 08:39 AM
WhippingBoy     
It's quite simple: if you refuse to allow the power company to install smart meters, the power company should have no obligation to provide your house with power.

All this nonsense about EMF "sensitivity" makes me realize that some people are blithering idiots. Get off our planet, you freakin moran's!

27 Jan 2013 08:40 AM
LeroyB     

poorjon: FTFA:
Reports of health risks due to the meter's wireless transmitter's omission of electromagnetic frequencies surfaced in 2011. People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

And that's just what happens when they're not emitting any signals. Imagine what will happen when they turn them on!



Dang! Came here to point out the omission of the emission.

27 Jan 2013 08:41 AM
glmorrs1     

HoneyDog: 2. It allows the utility to adjust the price in real time against the real time demand, thus allowing us to adjust our usage to make the best use of the energy we buy. Charge the electric car or do the laundry at night. Turn off the air conditioner if everyone is at school or work during the hottest part of the day. Use the energy when it is cheapest. A dumb power meter can't tell the difference, but a smart meter can.


How do they know if there is nobody in the house? I work from home some days. And what about my dogs? Why should they suffer in the heat?


Umm, the power company can't use the smart meter to, for example, change the temperature on the thermostat in your house. They just keep track of all the times you adjust it, and accordingly, adjust your bill. You know that, right?

/Or is my sarcasm meter broken this morning?

27 Jan 2013 08:43 AM
limeyfellow     

This About That: Lsherm: The biggest problem is that it's an old farmhouse, so the walls aren't insulated that well and the roof is black-tar painted tin. I'm getting the roof painted with silver reflective paint this spring, so I hope that takes some of the heat load off the house.

I'm a fan of big ol' farmhouses, but insulation didn't seem to be such a big priority back then. Have you investigated how long it would take to recoup the cost of insulation? Hint: Start with the attic.

A whole-house extractor fan would help, too. The extractor pulls the hot air from the upstairs after it cools off outside after dark, and sends it into the attic to displace the even hotter air up there. Open windows downstairs and start it up after dark.


We have one of the whole house extractor fans. It very nice on those spring and fall nights to get rid of the heat quickly and costs only a fraction of running the a/c. Well worth looking into.

27 Jan 2013 08:44 AM
GoldSpider     
This fight against smart-meters is a new form of weapons-grade stupidity that I'd never heard of. These are probably a lot of the same people who complain about how vulnerable and primitive our power grid is.

27 Jan 2013 08:45 AM
LewDux     
cdn.breitbart.comView Full Size

27 Jan 2013 08:45 AM
James F. Campbell     

bunner: This About That: and are less like to shoot a utility employee

Who got shot?


Utility worker found dead after going to turn off couple's power

27 Jan 2013 08:45 AM
Mrtraveler01     
Two vocal opponents of Naperville's initiative to install wireless electric meters on homes were arrested after interfering with the installation process, according to city officials.

White people problems.

27 Jan 2013 08:46 AM
notto     
People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

This is most likely caused by ghosts and spirits. The new meters just stir them up. This is why any professional ghost hunter will carry an RF meter with them.

They should be checking the suburb for an old cemetery or, as is more common, an ancient Indian burial ground.

27 Jan 2013 08:46 AM
Kyosuke     

LeroyB: poorjon: FTFA:
Reports of health risks due to the meter's wireless transmitter's omission of electromagnetic frequencies surfaced in 2011. People with the meters installed on their homes reported symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, tinnitus, and DNA breakdown.

And that's just what happens when they're not emitting any signals. Imagine what will happen when they turn them on!


Dang! Came here to point out the omission of the emission.


Really, this has never happened to me before.

27 Jan 2013 08:46 AM
Animatronik     
Obviously they are misguided and should allow the smart meters on their property.
But why are they arresting people? Why not simply cut off their electric service or automatically start charging them the monthly manual fee, which is ridiculously high.

Its not right to arrest people who dont want the service.

27 Jan 2013 08:48 AM
Alex Broughton Butt Chugger     

ZackDanger: HoneyDog: 2. It allows the utility to adjust the price in real time against the real time demand, thus allowing us to adjust our usage to make the best use of the energy we buy. Charge the electric car or do the laundry at night. Turn off the air conditioner if everyone is at school or work during the hottest part of the day. Use the energy when it is cheapest. A dumb power meter can't tell the difference, but a smart meter can.


How do they know if there is nobody in the house? I work from home some days. And what about my dogs? Why should they suffer in the heat?

Huh?

Electricity is cheaper at night. A smart reader knows *when* you are using electricity, so they can change the rates based on overall demand in the system. (A little cheaper at night, a little more expensive during the day for example.) There are in fact power/profit generation plants that operate on this principal alone.

http://www.firstlightpower.com/genera tion/north.asp

If you want to keep your AC on during the day, that's your prerogative.


Yeah, because fark night workers right? I mean sure, you'd like to be taken care of after your late night car crash, but that'll just have to wait till tomorrow. See, our underpaid night workers like to sleep with the AC on, because it's hot during the day. And bright. But of course they should pay more for that privilege, right? Because the world operates exactly within your preconceived notions of what is normal right? Your experience is representative of everyone else's.

27 Jan 2013 08:49 AM
Do_wacka_Do     
According to the Chicago Tribune, Malia "Kim" Bendis was also arrested on two misdemeanors for resisting a police officer and attempted eavesdropping, when she filmed police on scene, despite a recent federal court ruling that the state of Illinois's ban on recording police officers in the line of duty was "unconstitutional." The U.S. Supreme Court upheld that ruling in November.

No comments about this? You are slipping FARKERS.

27 Jan 2013 08:51 AM
Mrtraveler01     

Animatronik: Obviously they are misguided and should allow the smart meters on their property.
But why are they arresting people? Why not simply cut off their electric service or automatically start charging them the monthly manual fee, which is ridiculously high.

Its not right to arrest people who dont want the service.


This is why:

Stahl, who was released from custody about 4:30 p.m., said when she refused the smart meter, installers accompanied by police cut the bicycle lock she had placed on her fence and entered her backyard. She then stood in front of her electric meter and refused to move.

"It was forced on my house today," she said. "It was really a violation. I violated something, but I've been violated too so I guess we're now in a society of violating one another."


Whether you think both Naperville utility and police officials were out of line with this one is up for debate. But basically she confronted police.

27 Jan 2013 08:51 AM
mekkab     
The peeps in my hood are all cray-cray about not having smart meters installed. So this article comes as ZERO surprise to me.

/has a smart meter
//growing a third arm as I type this

27 Jan 2013 08:51 AM
HoneyDog     
Oh, they know. THEY KNOW.

So my dogs would just be SOL.

Huh?

Electricity is cheaper at night. A smart reader knows *when* you are using electricity, so they can change the rates based on overall demand in the system. (A little cheaper at night, a little more expensive during the day for example.) There are in fact power/profit generation plants that operate on this principal alone.

Of course a smart meter would know when I'm using the electricity. You missed the point. I sometimes work at home, so they could shut off my AC when I'm at home? What about my dogs, are they supposed to die of heat exhaustion because the company wants to shut off my AC during the day.

If you want to keep your AC on during the day, that's your prerogative.


Not according to the smart meter that is set at 75 degrees in the evening from 4 pm to 10 pm M-F and all day Saturday and Sunday. And is set at 78 degrees M-F from 7 am to 4 pm when we are usually out of the house.

27 Jan 2013 08:52 AM
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