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  • E.S.Q.: So... a whirlpool?


    This is one time when it's worth watching the video.  Looks more like a dust devil than a tornado, though.
  • E.S.Q.: So... a whirlpool?


    No, not really.  Someone should come along and clarify and correct me, but whirlpools are most often caused by tidal influences and features underneath the water.  Old Sow is a great example.  Dust devils and tornadoes are created by rising warm air that's swatted by cold air, and that's a really, really simple explanation.

    In this instance, it's water in the deepest seas.  The same principles behind dust devils and tornadoes may apply, maybe.  They mentioned a "bathic storm (bathospheric storm?)" in the video but I couldn't turn anything up easily on Google.  It's not a whirlpool, no, and this thing in the video isn't likely to ever see the surface at all.  It sure is wild to see, though.  I want to know more about it.
  • common sense is an oxymoron: E.S.Q.: So... a whirlpool?

    This is one time when it's worth watching the video.  Looks more like a dust devil than a tornado, though.



    Is there a link to YouTube or LiveLeak or something where I don't have to win at recursive levels of "guess which script server is redirecting to another script server?"
  • 433: E.S.Q.: So... a whirlpool?

    No, not really.  Someone should come along and clarify and correct me, but whirlpools are most often caused by tidal influences and features underneath the water.  Old Sow is a great example.  Dust devils and tornadoes are created by rising warm air that's swatted by cold air, and that's a really, really simple explanation.

    In this instance, it's water in the deepest seas.  The same principles behind dust devils and tornadoes may apply, maybe.  They mentioned a "bathic storm (bathospheric storm?)" in the video but I couldn't turn anything up easily on Google.  It's not a whirlpool, no, and this thing in the video isn't likely to ever see the surface at all.  It sure is wild to see, though.  I want to know more about it.


    They said "benthic storm," one of the features of which is movement of bottom sediment, but those are on a much larger scale.  But you're right about this looking more like a small-scale thermal/density-driven updraft; it even leaves a track and dissipates like a dust devil.
  • I've always thought of the atmosphere in terms of fluid dynamics anyway. Makes sense that if you have a tornado in air, you'd find a similar analog in water.
  • Kraken fart? It amazes me how little we know aboot the ocean, then I remember, it's just as deadly as space, things will eat you, and you can't look through it well with telescopes and the like
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