Comments

  • I hate working from home. I miss the people in the office, and I think I spend more time at my computer while working from home than I do in the office.

    But I'm old.
  • I worked from home for about 13 years.  Its definitely not for everyone.

    If you or someone you care about is in this situation, you have to learn to limit distractions, but do take advantage of being home.

    I faced my desk out the window so I can look away from the computer screen to something far away (good for the eyes and the sunlight is good for our mood).

    Get up about once an hour and do a tiny thing.  Start a load of laundry.  Get a drink from the kitchen.  Get the mail.  Whatever.  Keeps you moving a little.

    Its natural to miss your co-workers but realize that it will be healthier to develop non-work place based relationships.  Figure out who you'd like to connect with.  Right now that's tough because only morons meet new people during a pandemic, BUT in the before times I found a board game group that met once a month, a runner's group, and reconnected with an old friend who I wasn't as close with anymore.

    If your job allows you to get away with it, realize you can now slip out a 2 on a Tuesday for a walk in the sunshine or coffee with a bubble friend.  My best friend and I used to go to the movies on Tuesday afternoons.  It was awesome.
  • I live alone.  I hate office interruptions that only occur because we're near each other and don't warrant a phone call when that trouble has to be taken.  Working remotely 100% is the best thing that ever happened to my professional morale.  Two of my co-workers and I are going to a wine tasting next month, mostly because we miss seeing each other face to face.  And that's a plenty good workaround; I'm perfectly content never seeing most of my other 47 co-workers again, ever.
  • My wife is loving working from home.  She occasionally misses her co-workers, but is much more productive because people can't wander by her desk and take ten minutes to ask a two sentence question.  Now she gets the two sentences in an email.

    She also likes being able to have one of our dogs in her office, although one of them tends to wander off into forbidden rooms.
  • The trade off with not having to sit in traffic is worth it to me, and I'd rather people WFH than just having to upend every other aspect of daily life indefinitely.  Not to mention it'd be pretty sweet if "home" could suddenly be somewhere else with no consequence to my income.
  • As usual, it works for some but not for others. Suburban SFH with a dedicated office? Great. 600 sq ft flat with two roommates? Not so much. Repeat for 12,602 job/home/room/kid/location/internet va​riables and combinations.

    And for companies and managers; before saying "hey, everyone can just work from home so let's shut down the office"... is your HR person supposed to keep personnel files in her closet? Is your IT tech supposed to keep $30,000 worth of laptops in her garage?
  • I love working from home and want to never go back.  I do not miss my coworkers a bit.  In fact, working from home makes the urge to repeatedly hit them over the head with shovels a lot easier to manage now.  Not to mention the ability to put the phone on mute and take a piss when I have to pee and I'm stuck in a meeting listening to someone babble on for an hour.

    The only two things I don't like about it are:

    1) The lack of ability to have a 15 second hallway conversation with someone when you just need to discuss something briefly.  Most of the people in my office are over the age of 45 and chat is scary to them, and due to "privacy reasons" we were not able to distribute phone information for other co-workers, so we're left with email or meetings for quick conversations.

    2) Walking around from meeting to meeting or place to place.  I'm getting a lot less "passive" exercise, i.e. walking around without saying "I'm doing this just to exercise" than now, and I'm having to spend more time carving out time for exercise than I used to.
  • If you're speaking into your underwear, it's probably best to remain at home.
  • I've been trying to work from home for years. Given they have no problem sending guys on the road for weeks (months for some jobs) at a time I don't know why they are so gungho to get us all back in the office
  • My wife applied to work from home years ago. Her company kept telling her that it was working on it / it's not that simple / these things take time. Then little Miss Covid arrived. Schools with a fraction of the budget threw together improvised systems within a couple of weeks. Basically her company got shamed into doing what it should have done five years previously.

    On the days when the company's VPN software works, she is equally productive from home. It rarely works. On the plus side, her accuracy has gone up because she's getting more sleep having hours less time wasted daily on commute.
  • Love working from bome. Have built a home office in the basement: quiet, clean, carpeted and suspended ceiling, with bright walls and everything I need to do my job, for under $10k. So much better than the open plan office.
    And there's that 1.5 hr commute each way that isn't happening any more as well.

    I do get less exercise, but I am also far more productive and don't worry about looking like I'm working.
  • Truck Fump: Love working from bome. Have built a home office in the basement: quiet, clean, carpeted and suspended ceiling, with bright walls and everything I need to do my job, for under $10k. So much better than the open plan office.
    And there's that 1.5 hr commute each way that isn't happening any more as well.

    I do get less exercise, but I am also far more productive and don't worry about looking like I'm working.


    The lack of exercise is the biggest change for me. When I lived in Hong Kong, I'd get about an hour of walking per day between the commute, going out for lunch, etc. And since half the city is built on hillsides, there are a lot of stairs as well.

    We're living in the US now, but even though I worked from home pre-Covid I also traveled 30-40% and got a lot of exercise between city walking or long treks in the field (and carrying a bunch of stuff in both cases). It's not that I can't get the exercise now, I just need the self-discipline and make the time to do it.
  • BretMavrik: Truck Fump: Love working from bome. Have built a home office in the basement: quiet, clean, carpeted and suspended ceiling, with bright walls and everything I need to do my job, for under $10k. So much better than the open plan office.
    And there's that 1.5 hr commute each way that isn't happening any more as well.

    I do get less exercise, but I am also far more productive and don't worry about looking like I'm working.

    The lack of exercise is the biggest change for me. When I lived in Hong Kong, I'd get about an hour of walking per day between the commute, going out for lunch, etc. And since half the city is built on hillsides, there are a lot of stairs as well.

    We're living in the US now, but even though I worked from home pre-Covid I also traveled 30-40% and got a lot of exercise between city walking or long treks in the field (and carrying a bunch of stuff in both cases). It's not that I can't get the exercise now, I just need the self-discipline and make the time to do it.


    I find there's better opportunity to get exercise working from home.  I can usually find 30-45 minutes that I can slip away, be it "lunch" or just when I wrap up a task.  At work I'd often walk at lunch, but couldn't do anything too strenuous because I didn't want to work up a sweat.  At home I can just wear shorts and a t-shirt all day, or change into fresh clothes.
  • Obviously, none of the respondents are married.
  • You can't shepherd people back into the office until schools are consistent and safe.
  • hammettman: Obviously, none of the respondents are married.


    Ha!

    My boss told me his wife just went back to work at an elementary school.  She quite teaching back in 1989 when they got married.
  • Reading this while wearing my night shirt and having a cat on mt lap, so I'm getting a kick.
  • BretMavrik: As usual, it works for some but not for others. Suburban SFH with a dedicated office? Great. 600 sq ft flat with two roommates? Not so much. Repeat for 12,602 job/home/room/kid/location/internet va​riables and combinations.

    And for companies and managers; before saying "hey, everyone can just work from home so let's shut down the office"... is your HR person supposed to keep personnel files in her closet? Is your IT tech supposed to keep $30,000 worth of laptops in her garage?


    My guess is that to both questions those same managers will blissfully gesture upwards and say "We'll put them in the cloud."
  • I am telling all recruiters that I won't even consider working in an office again, and certainly won't be moving to New Jersey or Texas or anywhere else with large Red populations or stupid gun laws in order to work on servers that are all remote anyway. America needs to get its shiat together and stop being the Archie Bunker/Homer Simpson/Idaho Farmer/Pickup Truck Yokel of the Earth. WTF?
  • hammettman: Obviously, none of the respondents are married.


    *raises hand*

    Oh my search history?  Don't worry why I've been Googling divorce lawyers for the last two months...

    /kidding
    //love parts of working from home but miss the office a tiny bit
    ///maybe I'll be back there part time next year?
  • NotARocketScientist: Reading this while wearing my night shirt and having a cat on mt lap, so I'm getting a kick.


    I love my furry work from home coworkers but some days they are a bit much when I need to get stuff done.

    One of them sleeps basically on the feet of my chair so I have to look down anytime I want to move my feet or move my rolling office chair.  Another one hops on the desks and repeatedly demands bonks and then walks all over the keyboard so I have to keep pulling him down onto my lap.  The dog mainly just lays in the middle of my office but when she decides to clean herself she's making very loud slurping sounds so if I'm on a Skype meeting I have to snap my fingers at her or gently push her out of speaker range.

    /otherwise it's great
  • Speak for yourself, subby.

    Mrs. F laughs at me for still insisting on wearing button-down shirts and slacks on work days. She abandoned business attire long ago, and is not above taking meetings naked on occasion (obviously with the camera off---not your personal erotica site).

    I'd like to go back to the office, but it makes little sense to do so before a certain critical mass of colleagues do so. And many never will if they have any choice, vaccine or no.

    Maybe I'm just set in my ways.
  • A poor worker will goof off in the office and sometimes contribute to a more toxic work place. An employee with a good work ethic will get more done at home. Unless direct interaction with the public is required, most employers would actually be better off if they simply designated one day a week when everyone came into the office for in-person meetings, conferences, training lunches, and other team building interactions.
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