Comments

  • I really want to make tiny little butter noodles, now.
  • One holiday gift solution for someone who is nearly impossible to shop for.

    Thanks Fark
  • It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
    Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.
  • red5ish: It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
    Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.


    Obviously not, as demonstrated by the awesomeness of butter squirting through the grater knife.
  • red5ish: It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
    Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.


    A self warming one would be nice.

    /
    Heating one over a flame don't work
  • Did someone say "Japan" and "knife" in the same sentence? Better believe it's serious business!

    ロウソクの黒煙を集めて作った包丁
    Youtube zUCEMjhsvaU
  • khatores: Did someone say "Japan" and "knife" in the same sentence? Better believe it's serious business!

    [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/zUCEMjhs​vaU]


    Was actually going to recommend this one as it's a bit more apropos (The knife is made of milk...)

    カルーアミルクを作っていたら牛乳から包丁が作れると思った
    Youtube t557dPspLxo
  • Things like this is why I miss Japan (Lived there for 8 years).
    Everything, even the smallest little things or processes, are just improved to perfection.
  • red5ish: It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
    Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.


    The failure isn't the new knife. It's the form factor they've chosen.

    Also, butter in Japan doesn't come like butter in the 'States: It comes in slabs, as they've adopted the traditional European form factor.

    Using giant slabs of butter is barbaric and pretentious. Cubed butter warms much quicker and spreads just fine with a conventional butter knife. No Ginsu butter knife needed.
  • when you're in the mood for seppuku, but not in a hurry
    s3files.core77.comView Full Size
  • Wait, how does butter come in America?

    The article has the only butter I knew existed...although like way bigger here, 500g is standard.

    newshub.co.nzView Full Size
  • Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.
  • Whelp, there goes my butternoodle patent.
  • Good link subby. I have more than four pounds of butter in my frig right now and I can verify that something is going on.

    Several times in the past couple of years there have been spot shortages of butter in my area and I have no clue what is happening, but Japan is having a butter....... relationship.
  • OK. Here is the deal on all this stuff.

    As far as butter form factors, I have 2 450 gram blocks  unsalted. That is a pound each. Then for some reason, I have 4 150 gram slabs in individual boxes. Then I have one slightly larger, I think it is 200 grams.

    This is way too much information, but if you use a standard US butter dish, you could accommodate about 110 g or a quarter pound of butter in there and you would chop that off in squares. I guess there are butter dishes in Japan that would be a "double wide" like the one shown in the picture, but Japanese refrigerators, generally speaking, would burp and gag on something with that large a footprint.

    And the knife videos referenced above are just way out of hand. I think the second one shown is Kahlua Milk, which is different from the milk knife. I guess the last one I saw was one where a knife was made from the sand and seashells in a kitschy tchotchke. There must be 20 videos by now. The point seems to be that you can make anything out of anything, you just need to have.... an ANGLE. I have personally used ice knife technology to make an adhesive spreader. Can you imagine spreading a pint or so of adhesive and needing no tools or cleanup, or even gloves? Use an ice knife.

    A fun fact is that Japan has very strict knife laws that are almost never enforced. And they like it that way.

    The world is full of possibilities. We have so much to learn from each other.
  • The design failure on the butter noodle producing knife is that the user is pushing the knife, not pulling it.

    Maybe it's secretly for left handed people.
  • waxbeans: red5ish: It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
    Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.

    A self warming one would be nice.

    /
    Heating one over a flame don't work


    You should go for it. You could use a nichrome element from a curling iron or an old toaster oven and have it in a ceramic holder for a knife or something.

    OR

    You could set up a rig next to your toaster or IN your toaster???? to heat your knife while your toast is toasting.
  • 2fardownthread: OK. Here is the deal on all this stuff.

    As far as butter form factors, I have 2 450 gram blocks  unsalted. That is a pound each. Then for some reason, I have 4 150 gram slabs in individual boxes. Then I have one slightly larger, I think it is 200 grams.

    This is way too much information, but if you use a standard US butter dish, you could accommodate about 110 g or a quarter pound of butter in there and you would chop that off in squares. I guess there are butter dishes in Japan that would be a "double wide" like the one shown in the picture, but Japanese refrigerators, generally speaking, would burp and gag on something with that large a footprint.

    And the knife videos referenced above are just way out of hand. I think the second one shown is Kahlua Milk, which is different from the milk knife. I guess the last one I saw was one where a knife was made from the sand and seashells in a kitschy tchotchke. There must be 20 videos by now. The point seems to be that you can make anything out of anything, you just need to have.... an ANGLE. I have personally used ice knife technology to make an adhesive spreader. Can you imagine spreading a pint or so of adhesive and needing no tools or cleanup, or even gloves? Use an ice knife.

    A fun fact is that Japan has very strict knife laws that are almost never enforced. And they like it that way.

    The world is full of possibilities. We have so much to learn from each other.


    Burn the witch.
  • Paula Deen would be very perplexed with the concept of the butter knife. The stick is a perfectly fine unit of measurement.
  • A'Tuin: Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.


    OK. Your surprise is telling you either that you figured out something that 100 million Japanese people do not know OR you need to know more.

    Japan has more Michelin stars than any country save France, and Italy is a very distant third. The city of Tokyo by itself has about 50% more Michelin stars than the entire United States. I think this has profound meaning if one assumes that human capital is the only thing moving humanity forward.

    So I think, and this is just my opinion, that most Japanese people have grokked the bread plate and salad fork. They are just having fun at the breakfast table.
  • 2fardownthread: A'Tuin: Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.

    OK. Your surprise is telling you either that you figured out something that 100 million Japanese people do not know OR you need to know more.

    Japan has more Michelin stars than any country save France, and Italy is a very distant third. The city of Tokyo by itself has about 50% more Michelin stars than the entire United States. I think this has profound meaning if one assumes that human capital is the only thing moving humanity forward.

    So I think, and this is just my opinion, that most Japanese people have grokked the bread plate and salad fork. They are just having fun at the breakfast table.


    and what, pray tell, do michelin stars -awarded for taste and presentation in one specific restaurant at a time- have to do with how people use -or don't use- specific pieces of silverware at home?

    for the record, butter "noodles" look oh-so-fun! but a "french" butter dish with room temperature butter is best.

    Fark user imageView Full Size
    Fark user imageView Full Size
  • dyhchong: Wait, how does butter come in America?

    The article has the only butter I knew existed...although like way bigger here, 500g is standard.

    [newshub.co.nz image 850x485]


    In the US, butter usually comes in a one pound (~450g) package...
    Fark user imageView Full Size


    ...split into four individually wrapped "sticks."
    Fark user imageView Full Size


    Of course, we can also find blocks of "european-style" butter that the rest of the world is used to. When I want to splurge on butter, I'll usually get some Kerrygold Irish butter.
  • A'Tuin: Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.


    In my household, corn on the cob is applied directly to the communal butter stick for thorough buttering.  Just don't chew on the cob first.
  • Holy shiat, that's cool.
  • Load 25 of 26 newer comments
  •  

This thread is closed to new comments.


Close