Comments

  • well, if you count la petite mort.
  • What You Don't Know About Germs Could Be Making You Sick

    For example, people read articles like this in Readers Digest Canada, become anxious over perfectly normal skin and environmental bacteria, and finally the stress from that obsessive anxiety in both the short and long term makes them sick.
  • Wash your hands in freezing cold water because you can and never wash your chicken.

    Thanks MSN.
  • TWX: well, if you count la petite mort.


    I must not fap.
    Fap is the time-killer.
    Fap is the petite mort that brings total exhilaration.
    I will pace my fap.
    I will permit it to pass over me and through me
    And when it has gone past I will turn ol' one-eye to see its path
    Where the fap has gone there will be nothing. Only... ew.
  • I believe that is the Litany Against Fap, recited every day in November for... reasons.
  • Can't do 13, because I live in a country that doesn't run hot water to washing machines (and generally doesn't use heated driers).  For all the talk of Japanese cleanliness, it sure doesn't trickle down to laundry habits. It's not uncommon for assholes on the train to smell like mildew in the winter from hanging their wet laundry inside.

    /having sensitive skin sucks
    //spent an ungodly amount on a washing machine with heated drying
    ///still wish it had a warm/hot wash option
  • kyuzokai: Can't do 13, because I live in a country that doesn't run hot water to washing machines (and generally doesn't use heated driers).  For all the talk of Japanese cleanliness, it sure doesn't trickle down to laundry habits. It's not uncommon for assholes on the train to smell like mildew in the winter from hanging their wet laundry inside.

    /having sensitive skin sucks
    //spent an ungodly amount on a washing machine with heated drying
    ///still wish it had a warm/hot wash option


    encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size


    Are you sure they just don't work with Matango?
  • I recall, about 15 years ago, seeing a microbiologist interviewed about E. coli on TV about our microflora.

    He said that fecal coliform bacteria are always on your skin, from waistband level to mid-thigh.  Always.

    And showering only makes them multiply, because warm and moist.

    Fortunately, nearly all of them are harmless and some even beneficial, occupying a niche that would otherwise be taken over by less friendly flora.

    The things we should be worried about are microorganisms we pick up on our hands from other surfaces.

    When asked about handwashing habits, he said "I wash my hands before I go to the bathroom."

    /especially recommended if you spend a lot of time at a whiteboard
    //using a red marker
    ///and are married
  • get yourself a full body suit from Harbor Freight, put it on and hide in the basement.
  • bughunter: I recall, about 15 years ago, seeing a microbiologist interviewed about E. coli on TV about our microflora.

    He said that fecal coliform bacteria are always on your skin, from waistband level to mid-thigh.  Always.

    And showering only makes them multiply, because warm and moist.

    Fortunately, nearly all of them are harmless and some even beneficial, occupying a niche that would otherwise be taken over by less friendly flora.

    The things we should be worried about are microorganisms we pick up on our hands from other surfaces.

    When asked about handwashing habits, he said "I wash my hands before I go to the bathroom."

    /especially recommended if you spend a lot of time at a whiteboard
    //using a red marker
    ///and are married


    / or recently worked with peppers
    / friend found this out the unfortunate way
  • kyuzokai: Can't do 13, because I live in a country that doesn't run hot water to washing machines (and generally doesn't use heated driers).  For all the talk of Japanese cleanliness, it sure doesn't trickle down to laundry habits. It's not uncommon for assholes on the train to smell like mildew in the winter from hanging their wet laundry inside.

    /having sensitive skin sucks
    //spent an ungodly amount on a washing machine with heated drying
    ///still wish it had a warm/hot wash option


    I have two shirts that followed me home from Takayama impregnated with eternal mildew. I wash them hot, use vinegar, etc... But after a while the stank returns. And it always tries to take over the other shirts in that drawer. I love these two shirts, but after 10mos, I think I may have to nuke them from orbit.  Just to be sure.
  • I'm not washing my hands with cold water in January.  No friggin' way.
  • kyuzokai: Can't do 13, because I live in a country that doesn't run hot water to washing machines (and generally doesn't use heated driers).  For all the talk of Japanese cleanliness, it sure doesn't trickle down to laundry habits. It's not uncommon for assholes on the train to smell like mildew in the winter from hanging their wet laundry inside.

    /having sensitive skin sucks
    //spent an ungodly amount on a washing machine with heated drying
    ///still wish it had a warm/hot wash option


    I am going to go all light and no heat on this one. I live out in the country where people make fun of us, and i have a washer dryer with timers and fully automatic super quiet heat pump technology. It is light years ahead of anything I have seen in the US in terms of efficiency and convenience. I bought it probably 15 years ago for 1500 dollars. This is the no muss no fuss solution. If yours does not use heat pump technology, you might save some money, but your electric bill for drying clothes will kill you. Finance the heat pump. It is worth it.

    OR I am very sure you can get a used one on the net, at HARD OFF online, or Second Street or whatever. An older one, second hand will serve you well. It might cost you 500 bucks.

    OR Failing that, why not buy a pump for 10 bucks from a home center and pump your OFURO water into your washer so you have your hot wash cycle? You can use a cold rinse. It might take some manual management, but you can have your hot water, a smaller water bill, and cleaner clothes.

    OR You could also just dump in a bucket of hot water with detergent and let it soak before starting a regular wash cycle.

    OR Laundromats.

    And .... As far as drying, I am not sure where you are located, but especially in winter, things are dry. Or windy, which can be just as good. OR very cold, so the water turns to ice and sublimates outside. Let your clothes dry outside mostly, then bring them inside to a small room with a dehumidifier. I have one I got for a couple hundred bucks which I never use. There must be tons of used ones, especially cheap this time of year.

    I am sorry you find life in Japan difficult.
  • BafflerMeal: kyuzokai: Can't do 13, because I live in a country that doesn't run hot water to washing machines (and generally doesn't use heated driers).  For all the talk of Japanese cleanliness, it sure doesn't trickle down to laundry habits. It's not uncommon for assholes on the train to smell like mildew in the winter from hanging their wet laundry inside.

    /having sensitive skin sucks
    //spent an ungodly amount on a washing machine with heated drying
    ///still wish it had a warm/hot wash option

    I have two shirts that followed me home from Takayama impregnated with eternal mildew. I wash them hot, use vinegar, etc... But after a while the stank returns. And it always tries to take over the other shirts in that drawer. I love these two shirts, but after 10mos, I think I may have to nuke them from orbit.  Just to be sure.


    Baking soda is probably not going to do it, but have you tried it? Depending on the color, you might also try strong bleach.

    And also depending on the color, realizing that vinegar does not work and if baking soda does not, then a very well filtered wood ash solution soaking or lye will give you super high pH that nothing can survive. Nothing. Black locust or oak ash if you can get it.

    I have some garments that get really stinky really quickly. I wash them and it goes away. It might just be the material.

    Keep charcoal or cedar or baking soda in your closet or chest of drawers. This time of year, lavender sprigs are everywhere.

    etc. I hate mildew. I won't tolerate it. I fight pretty well constantly with a certain family member who will not let me just be a control freak and eliminate it once and for all.
  • My family has an unfortunate professional relationship with a certain ophthalmologist. It has lasted for decades.

    I had a particular incident where I had eaten something, probably bad peanuts, and I was having migraines. An aflatoxin thing. They were peanuts from a country I should not have been eating peanuts from. I was watching pulp fiction when Samuel L. Jackson's face split in half diagonally. I had other vision problems. I went to see the doctor if there was some physiological damage. I explained it and drew a picture of Sam Jackson's face. He said, " I think the problem is not in your eye. It is in your brain!" Everyone had a big laugh. What a dick.

    A couple of years later, I was doing some yard work and got something in my eye. Went to the guy and he said, "Ah... you are just imagining it. You scratched something. It will be ok." Three days later, I asked my daughter to have a look and she pulled out a sliver from under my eyelid. Big as a tree branch. The doctor is an incompetent dick.

    Somewhere between those episodes, I had a case of conjunctivitis. I went to see him and got the usual antibiotic solution. Big deal. I asked him how I probably got it. He told me I "probably got it from scratching my butt and then scratching my eyes. That is how most people get it. Haha." The doctor is a rude, incompetent dick.

    Certain family members find him to be just an overworked sad sack, and interesting. I keep him in mind as the best reason to always use eye protection.
  • bughunter: ..."microbiologist interviewed ...said 'I wash my hands before I go to the bathroom.'"

    Farm boys already know this.
  • I thought using warm water just helps with the mechanical action - I find it more difficult to lather, as well as properly rinse off with cold water.

    Am I the stupid one here?
  • Insult Comic Bishounen: I'm not washing my hands with cold water in January.  No friggin' way.


    No one is saying you need to be uncomfortable. It is saying it doesn't help with getting rid of bacteria, so if that is the reason rather than comfort, save a few bucks and use colder water.
  • bisi: I thought using warm water just helps with the mechanical action - I find it more difficult to lather, as well as properly rinse off with cold water.

    Am I the stupid one here?


    The article is a stupid slideshow.  Don't give it too much thought.  It jumps its premise in the first slide. a) of course bacteria care about temperature (although not at the range of your sink so much) b) also, yes, increased heat increases the speed of emulsification and mechanical separation.  So: at your sink water temp doesn't matter much in regards to *killing* bacteria, but warm water makes it faster and easier for soap to disrupt bacterial cell membranes as well as remove bacteria from your skin.

    2fardownthread: And also depending on the color, realizing that vinegar does not work and if baking soda does not, then a very well filtered wood ash solution soaking or lye will give you super high pH that nothing can survive. Nothing. Black locust or oak ash if you can get it.


    Thanks for the recommendations.  Shopping now...
  • 2fardownthread: kyuzokai: Can't do 13, because I live in a country that doesn't run hot water to washing machines (and generally doesn't use heated driers).  For all the talk of Japanese cleanliness, it sure doesn't trickle down to laundry habits. It's not uncommon for assholes on the train to smell like mildew in the winter from hanging their wet laundry inside.

    /having sensitive skin sucks
    //spent an ungodly amount on a washing machine with heated drying
    ///still wish it had a warm/hot wash option

    I am going to go all light and no heat on this one. I live out in the country where people make fun of us, and i have a washer dryer with timers and fully automatic super quiet heat pump technology. It is light years ahead of anything I have seen in the US in terms of efficiency and convenience. I bought it probably 15 years ago for 1500 dollars. This is the no muss no fuss solution. If yours does not use heat pump technology, you might save some money, but your electric bill for drying clothes will kill you. Finance the heat pump. It is worth it.

    OR I am very sure you can get a used one on the net, at HARD OFF online, or Second Street or whatever. An older one, second hand will serve you well. It might cost you 500 bucks.

    OR Failing that, why not buy a pump for 10 bucks from a home center and pump your OFURO water into your washer so you have your hot wash cycle? You can use a cold rinse. It might take some manual management, but you can have your hot water, a smaller water bill, and cleaner clothes.

    OR You could also just dump in a bucket of hot water with detergent and let it soak before starting a regular wash cycle.

    OR Laundromats.

    And .... As far as drying, I am not sure where you are located, but especially in winter, things are dry. Or windy, which can be just as good. OR very cold, so the water turns to ice and sublimates outside. Let your clothes dry outside mostly, then bring them inside to a small room with a dehumidifier. I have one I got for a couple hundred bucks which I never use. There must be tons of used ones, especially cheap this time of year.

    I am sorry you find life in Japan difficult.


    When I lived with the in-laws, I went to the laundromat every week. When we got our own place, I bought a Hitachi big drum which kicks ass and has a great dryer. As I said, though, I wish it had heated washing. My wife has gotten used to heated drying as well after living in the USA, so she uses it as much as I do. I've considered running a temp line from the tub for hot water, but the wife is adamantly opposed to any rigged up solutions (she's the kind of person who would never buy a used car or anything else), even if it's specifically made for that purpose. She won't even let me run a network cable so we can move the router to a better location than in the farthest corner of the apartment. I appreciate that you spent all that time typing up what I already knew, though.

    I'm not sure where you get that I find life in Japan difficult. I moved back after leaving because I love it here so much. That's not to say there aren't things to complain about (as with anything/anywhere). If I'm reading your tone correctly (and please forgive me if I'm wrong), you might want to turn down the "righteous indignation". Not everyone is a hater. You come across as a bit of a "japan white knight" prick (but it's late and I might be misinterpreting your "all light no heat" let-me-school-you-about-japan post.)

    /please hammer, don't hurt 'em
  • We picked up a little haier washing machine with a 20 gallon basket to use in our  small bathroom in  winter because our big one is outside and has to be mothballed or it will freeze, and i hate going to the laundromat weekly.
    The little one works very well but it has no water heat selection. It does, however, draw its water from the bathroom sink faucet which does have hot water so no problem for a hot wash. A drying rack and hangers on the shower curtain rod let us hang laundry to dry, bath has a little heater, and we need the extra humidity from the drying clothes as the air is so dry up here. No mildew smell either. Hardest part of the installation was  putting in a proper dedicated washing machine drain, trap, and standpipe so no drainage accidents happen.
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