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  • Most of them are historically agrarian riverine areas, except:

    1. Florida (a lifestyle/climate choice...at least for a little while longer)
    2. WV, which is a victim of its steep topography

    The only solution will be to relocate everyone from those two states to coastal California.

    COMING UP NEXT ON MTV!
  • You don't need flood insurance unless you are in a floodplain.

    You can't get flood insurance unless you are in a floodplain.

    However, if you are in a floodplain, you can't get flood insurance.
  • Cafe Threads: You don't need flood insurance unless you are in a floodplain.

    You can't get flood insurance unless you are in a floodplain.

    However, if you are in a floodplain, you can't get flood insurance.


    And if you already have it: "oops, it looks like you live in an area with a preexisting flood risk, so we're going to have to drop you".

    /taking a page from the pre-Obamacare handbook
  • Joke's on you, I live on the 7th floor.
  • Terrebonne Parish, LA doesn't look like its going to "good land" much longer....
  • Cafe Threads: You don't need flood insurance unless you are in a floodplain.

    You can't get flood insurance unless you are in a floodplain.

    However, if you are in a floodplain, you can't get flood insurance.


    Not quite true.

    We have a creek on our property. House and everything is well above grade, if i get flooded EVERYONE is farked....but i'd still rather not get flooded.

    The flood maps didn't qualify us for the government stuff that would make it actually pretty damn affordable and stupid not to just tack on. Being covered for it otherwise was pretty expensive, and made more sense to just take the risk on in our position.

    I was REALLY tempted though to try and fight the maps and get our designation changed, because i wouldn't mind carrying the insurance, but it also turns off a lot of buyers right at the door if your house is in a "flood" zone.

    That said you can get relatively inexpensive riders for specific stuff that your standard homeowners won't cover because its a "flood" that would cover most people's needs. I mean if my creek really does come up that high and farks my house, yeah, i'm SOL, but also all of NJ is under water at that point.
  • "Rainelle, W.Va., flooded in June 2016"

    Well of course it did. You named it Rainelle. It's right there in the title
  • Cafe Threads: You don't need flood insurance unless you are in a floodplain.

    You can't get flood insurance unless you are in a floodplain.

    However, if you are in a floodplain, you can't get flood insurance.


    I'm pretty sure the NFIP is more than happy to write you a policy if you are in a low-to-no-risk area.  I've seen no wording from them that excludes anyone.  In fact, I understood there to be quite a discount for low-risk areas.

    /Coastal VA resident
    /Required by bank to carry flood insurance on house
  • FaygoMaster: I'm pretty sure the NFIP is more than happy to write you a policy if you are in a low-to-no-risk area.


    No risk is actually really hard unless you get your designation changed, which isn't that hard, but now you live in a "flood" area, which hurts your property value.

    Low risk, or even moderate risk, is insanely affordable.
  • As a person who lives in a region that receives enough rain yearly to disprove the biblical "Great Flood", I'm glad to see we're in the lightest of blues.
  • Ah ha!
    Another benefit to being Canadian.
    Living all the way up here we will stay nice and dry.
  • With the exception of idiots who insist on living on the coast this will impact almost no one. Virtually all the non-coastal impacted areas are sparsely populated.

    But don't let that stop you from causing another 'emergency' that will require more federal power.
  • Bottom line: Get a plunger before you need a plunger.
  • LineNoise: FaygoMaster: I'm pretty sure the NFIP is more than happy to write you a policy if you are in a low-to-no-risk area.

    No risk is actually really hard unless you get your designation changed, which isn't that hard, but now you live in a "flood" area, which hurts your property value.

    Low risk, or even moderate risk, is insanely affordable.


    Yeah, I reckon "no risk" is a pretty high bar to clear.  What place would be "no risk?"

    Floods can happen not just along a river bank or the coast.  It can also happen where storm drains become overwhelmed.  This happened in Virginia Beach several years ago after a very heavy rainfall.  A neighborhood that was "low risk" had gotten flooded out because the storm drains couldn't keep up.  Ironically, the worst I saw at my place was some flooding at the bottom of the street; my neighborhood is affected more by tidal flooding than anything.
  • St Charles county, MO is only 2%.  Figured it'd be higher.
  • Where did Pinellas county go?  It's a teeny tiny dot
  • Never buy waterfront property.
  • LineNoise: Cafe Threads: You don't need flood insurance unless you are in a floodplain.

    You can't get flood insurance unless you are in a floodplain.

    However, if you are in a floodplain, you can't get flood insurance.

    Not quite true.

    We have a creek on our property. House and everything is well above grade, if i get flooded EVERYONE is farked....but i'd still rather not get flooded.

    The flood maps didn't qualify us for the government stuff that would make it actually pretty damn affordable and stupid not to just tack on. Being covered for it otherwise was pretty expensive, and made more sense to just take the risk on in our position.

    I was REALLY tempted though to try and fight the maps and get our designation changed, because i wouldn't mind carrying the insurance, but it also turns off a lot of buyers right at the door if your house is in a "flood" zone.

    That said you can get relatively inexpensive riders for specific stuff that your standard homeowners won't cover because its a "flood" that would cover most people's needs. I mean if my creek really does come up that high and farks my house, yeah, i'm SOL, but also all of NJ is under water at that point.


    Does it vary state by state? I've had flood insurance in both Va and Ga. Both times I was told I didn't need it because I wasn't in a flood area but got it anyway. I lived in the house in Ga for 6 months before the basement flooded from to much rain. That $500/year saved me over $20k. This happened last year. If you buy a house with a basement get flood insurance no matter what anyone says. It covers outside water coming in and is well worth it just for the peace of mind.
  • Monty Python - Swamp Castle.wmv
    Youtube aNaXdLWt17A
  • Humans living near water? Inconceivable.
  • I'm trying to remember the Farker's handle who insisted that global warming's prediction of much higher rainfall in the Central Plains would turn the Central Plains into the worst floodplain of all, despite soil scientists saying 'no that's not how it'll work'.

    Fark user imageView Full Size


    /this bud's for you, dude
    // ... *bong gurgling noises*
  • Love the Louisiana map.  Don't these people know in South Louisiana the houses float anyways?
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