Comments

  • What does it say of our planet when people will literally give away their money just to leave it for a few minutes.

    /s

    //Donated, good cause, don't care about the flight cause I won't win anyway
  • It's open to US persons only, as defined by the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (no, I'm not making that up) AND living in the US

    You can also enter without a donation, but don't do that.
  • Am I crazy that, much though I love space, I don't want to go to space?

    I especially don't want to go to space without an actual real-life astronaut on board.
  • Gubbo: Am I crazy that, much though I love space, I don't want to go to space?

    I especially don't want to go to space without an actual real-life astronaut on board.


    I entered, and the way I look at it is this:  Odds are highest you'll die on launch.  Not much an astronaut is going to be able to do to help you there that can't be done from the ground.  You might die on orbit, e.g. from an object strike and pressure loss, but how hard is it to learn how to squeeze fix-a-flat into a hole?  You might die on re-entry, and this is the one place where you'd think a live person who can control the vehicle would help.  But by that phase of flight, I'd be in "don't care, been to space!" territory.

    So yeah, I'm all in.  But if do happen to win, I'm buying the biggest term life insurance policy I can find that doesn't have a hazardous activity exclusion.
  • Altimus Prime: Gubbo: Am I crazy that, much though I love space, I don't want to go to space?

    I especially don't want to go to space without an actual real-life astronaut on board.

    I entered, and the way I look at it is this:  Odds are highest you'll die on launch.  Not much an astronaut is going to be able to do to help you there that can't be done from the ground.  You might die on orbit, e.g. from an object strike and pressure loss, but how hard is it to learn how to squeeze fix-a-flat into a hole?  You might die on re-entry, and this is the one place where you'd think a live person who can control the vehicle would help.  But by that phase of flight, I'd be in "don't care, been to space!" territory.

    So yeah, I'm all in.  But if do happen to win, I'm buying the biggest term life insurance policy I can find that doesn't have a hazardous activity exclusion.


    I dunno. There's a reason that planes have pilots (actually there are clearly lots of reasons), but it's so that you have someone trained and experienced for the exceedingly rare times when things go wrong.

    How long were Bob and Doug training to fly that capsule compared to how long will this group get.

    /I'm not eligible anyway so it's truly academic
  • Gubbo: Altimus Prime: Gubbo: Am I crazy that, much though I love space, I don't want to go to space?

    I especially don't want to go to space without an actual real-life astronaut on board.

    I entered, and the way I look at it is this:  Odds are highest you'll die on launch.  Not much an astronaut is going to be able to do to help you there that can't be done from the ground.  You might die on orbit, e.g. from an object strike and pressure loss, but how hard is it to learn how to squeeze fix-a-flat into a hole?  You might die on re-entry, and this is the one place where you'd think a live person who can control the vehicle would help.  But by that phase of flight, I'd be in "don't care, been to space!" territory.

    So yeah, I'm all in.  But if do happen to win, I'm buying the biggest term life insurance policy I can find that doesn't have a hazardous activity exclusion.

    I dunno. There's a reason that planes have pilots (actually there are clearly lots of reasons), but it's so that you have someone trained and experienced for the exceedingly rare times when things go wrong.

    How long were Bob and Doug training to fly that capsule compared to how long will this group get.

    /I'm not eligible anyway so it's truly academic


    Eh, the guy sponsoring it at least runs an aviation jet training center, little better than nothing.
  • SVC_conservative: Gubbo: Altimus Prime: Gubbo: Am I crazy that, much though I love space, I don't want to go to space?

    I especially don't want to go to space without an actual real-life astronaut on board.

    I entered, and the way I look at it is this:  Odds are highest you'll die on launch.  Not much an astronaut is going to be able to do to help you there that can't be done from the ground.  You might die on orbit, e.g. from an object strike and pressure loss, but how hard is it to learn how to squeeze fix-a-flat into a hole?  You might die on re-entry, and this is the one place where you'd think a live person who can control the vehicle would help.  But by that phase of flight, I'd be in "don't care, been to space!" territory.

    So yeah, I'm all in.  But if do happen to win, I'm buying the biggest term life insurance policy I can find that doesn't have a hazardous activity exclusion.

    I dunno. There's a reason that planes have pilots (actually there are clearly lots of reasons), but it's so that you have someone trained and experienced for the exceedingly rare times when things go wrong.

    How long were Bob and Doug training to fly that capsule compared to how long will this group get.

    /I'm not eligible anyway so it's truly academic

    Eh, the guy sponsoring it at least runs an aviation jet training center, little better than nothing.


    I wouldn't trust whoever is running Ferrari to take me around Monza in their F1 car.

    /yes I know it's only got one seat, that's not the point
    //and yes, I know that Dragon essentially flies itself
  • Gubbo: SVC_conservative: Gubbo: Altimus Prime: Gubbo: Am I crazy that, much though I love space, I don't want to go to space?

    I especially don't want to go to space without an actual real-life astronaut on board.

    I entered, and the way I look at it is this:  Odds are highest you'll die on launch.  Not much an astronaut is going to be able to do to help you there that can't be done from the ground.  You might die on orbit, e.g. from an object strike and pressure loss, but how hard is it to learn how to squeeze fix-a-flat into a hole?  You might die on re-entry, and this is the one place where you'd think a live person who can control the vehicle would help.  But by that phase of flight, I'd be in "don't care, been to space!" territory.

    So yeah, I'm all in.  But if do happen to win, I'm buying the biggest term life insurance policy I can find that doesn't have a hazardous activity exclusion.

    I dunno. There's a reason that planes have pilots (actually there are clearly lots of reasons), but it's so that you have someone trained and experienced for the exceedingly rare times when things go wrong.

    How long were Bob and Doug training to fly that capsule compared to how long will this group get.

    /I'm not eligible anyway so it's truly academic

    Eh, the guy sponsoring it at least runs an aviation jet training center, little better than nothing.

    I wouldn't trust whoever is running Ferrari to take me around Monza in their F1 car.

    /yes I know it's only got one seat, that's not the point
    //and yes, I know that Dragon essentially flies itself


    So:

    1. it turns out it uses an intuitive touch screen interface: https://techcrunch.com/2020​/05/30/nasa-astronauts-successfully-pi​lot-spacexs-crew-dragon-spacecraft-man​ually-for-the-first-time/#:~:text=NASA​%20astronauts%20successfully%20pilot%2​0SpaceX's%20Crew%20Dragon%20spacecraft​%20manually%20for%20the%20first%20time​,-Darrell%20Etherington%40etherington
    2. You can try it yourself: https://iss-sim.spacex.com/
  • I just ponied up $15 for 200 chances.  Hell, why not?

    (would have to lose 50 pounds if I actually won).
  • Altimus Prime: Gubbo: Am I crazy that, much though I love space, I don't want to go to space?

    I especially don't want to go to space without an actual real-life astronaut on board.

    I entered, and the way I look at it is this:  Odds are highest you'll die on launch.  Not much an astronaut is going to be able to do to help you there that can't be done from the ground.  You might die on orbit, e.g. from an object strike and pressure loss, but how hard is it to learn how to squeeze fix-a-flat into a hole?  You might die on re-entry, and this is the one place where you'd think a live person who can control the vehicle would help.  But by that phase of flight, I'd be in "don't care, been to space!" territory.

    So yeah, I'm all in.  But if do happen to win, I'm buying the biggest term life insurance policy I can find that doesn't have a hazardous activity exclusion.


    No one has died in orbit unless you count Soyuz 11. So it is your chance to be first. Quick thinking by Neil Armstrong and Dave Scott prevented them from being first.

    None of the reentry accidents so far could have been helped by an astronaut. Soyuz 1 had a parachute failure. Soyuz 11 lost air pressure while in the process of returning home. They are the only humans to die in space. Colombia broke apart because of launch damage.

    There is nothing Challenger's crew could have done. And finally the Apollo 1 crew died in a test and there is nothing they could have done.
  • Serious question: How has St. Jude, whose donations few people realize filter through an organization called "American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities" avoided being caught up in Q? The combination of vulnerable kids, big donors, and a "secret" organization that sounds like it's run by brown (and possibly Muslim!) people seems irresistible.
  • US citizens/domiciled only.
  • Do they have a fat enough space suit to fit farkers  in it ?
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