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  • I'm really trying to think of worse job security in all of the major sports than "hitting coach" or "pitching coach", and I don't think there is one. One of those two (sometimes both)  are usually the first to get pushed under the bus when a team is struggling. And it's not unheard-of to have *several* hitting coaches for a team in a single year.
  • I feel like hitting coaches only get mentioned in the news when they're hired or fired.
  • Joe_diGriz: I'm really trying to think of worse job security in all of the major sports than "hitting coach" or "pitching coach", and I don't think there is one. One of those two (sometimes both)  are usually the first to get pushed under the bus when a team is struggling. And it's not unheard-of to have *several* hitting coaches for a team in a single year.


    I think you're right, until they formalize the position of Fall Guy, who exists only to receive praise when the team does well, or get blamed when the team does poorly.

    / There got to be a joke here somewhere about the Mets always doing poorly.
  • It wasn't so much his fault as much as he was a holdover from the past regime. His hitting philosophy is a little too old school for the Mets attempts to get more analytics driven. He wasn't big on launch angles and related philosophies.

    Plus the 341 million dollar man is barely hitting .200.
  • DRTFA: / There got to be a joke here somewhere about the Mets always doing poorly.


    The season before going to the Mets, Lindor had career lows for BA (.258), OBP (.335), and SLG (.415). League averages for those stats in 2020 were .245, .322, and .418, respectively. The Mets are paying Lindor $341M over 10 years, and they fired Davis because Lindor is actually hitting worse than he did last year (.163, .284, .209). This entire situation is Mets Baseball. That's the joke.

    /sorry, my jokes aren't often funny
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