Comments

  • "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.
  • from now on...?
    or
    from now, one...?
  • snocone: "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.


    Self Loading Freight.

    /To be fair the early astronauts, Russian and American, were just passengers. IIRC the first Mercury capsules didn't even have controls.
  • The FAA only regulates launch and reentry, and there's not a lot of work being done space-wise during launch and re-entry.  It all happens during orbit, which the FAA does not oversee.  That is the sole purview of Space Force.  Space Force won't be happy that the FAA is horning in on their territory.  I sure hope we get an inter-agency battle royale over the high ground.
  • I presume this change was made after they gave the billionaires their shiny buttons?
  • Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.

    Self Loading Freight.

    /To be fair the early astronauts, Russian and American, were just passengers. IIRC the first Mercury capsules didn't even have controls.


    The story is that the fight over just having a window was a make or break issue.
  • Gubbo: I presume this change was made after they gave the billionaires their shiny buttons?


    Nope: https://futurism.com/jeff-bezos-astro​n​aut

    No official body gives Astronaut wings to someone who is just flying meat.
  • snocone: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.

    Self Loading Freight.

    /To be fair the early astronauts, Russian and American, were just passengers. IIRC the first Mercury capsules didn't even have controls.

    The story is that the fight over just having a window was a make or break issue.


    Sheppard didn't have a window. The second Mercury flight, with Grissom, got a window. So Gus was the first American to actually see space.
  • Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.

    Self Loading Freight.

    /To be fair the early astronauts, Russian and American, were just passengers. IIRC the first Mercury capsules didn't even have controls.

    The story is that the fight over just having a window was a make or break issue.

    Sheppard didn't have a window. The second Mercury flight, with Grissom, got a window. So Gus was the first American to actually see space.


    You are, of course and always, wrong.

    https://airandspace.si.edu/collection​-​objects/capsule-mercury-mr-3/nasm_A196​20021000

    Though you will claim correctness as they are described as technically portholes and a periscope
  • In order to maintain the prestige of Commercial Space Astronaut Wings

    Why is the FAA in the business of awarding prestige certificates?
  • ZAZ: In order to maintain the prestige of Commercial Space Astronaut Wings

    Why is the FAA in the business of awarding prestige certificates?


    Everybody wants a trophy.
  • They also need to be able to pass the "NASA long-duration flight astronaut physical," which, among many other things, requires them to have 20/20 vision, a blood pressure of below 140/90 while sitting and a "standing height between 62 and 75 inches

    I'm going to go around telling people this is the only reason I never became an astronaut.
  • Fark user imageView Full Size

    Ahh, you can just order one off the internet.
  • What if you're just a space cadet?
  • Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.

    Self Loading Freight.

    /To be fair the early astronauts, Russian and American, were just passengers. IIRC the first Mercury capsules didn't even have controls.


    No.  The Mercury spacecraft all had manual flight controls.  The initial proposals were to not have them, but the astronauts insisted that they be included.

    Every single Mercury astronaut could control his spacecraft.
  • dittybopper: Every single Mercury astronaut could control his spacecraft.


    Except for that one time with Gus Grissom.
  • dittybopper: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.

    Self Loading Freight.

    /To be fair the early astronauts, Russian and American, were just passengers. IIRC the first Mercury capsules didn't even have controls.

    No.  The Mercury spacecraft all had manual flight controls.  The initial proposals were to not have them, but the astronauts insisted that they be included.

    Every single Mercury astronaut could control his spacecraft.


    Vostok also had backup manual controls, in a closed box with a padlock that had to be unlocked with a code. Korolev told Gagarin the password on the side, because he wasn't supposed to know until there was an emergency and he opened the envelope which contained it. First instance of "shadow IT" (lol.jpg)
  • NOW watch the number of reserved flights on these Space Party Limos to get cancelled en masse. Why pay a sh*tload and risk death if you aren't allowed to swagger & brag about it at the Influencer Gala?

    Imagine Kanye West emerging from the capsule and immediately saying that he's now of the same "Right Stuff" as Gagarin and Armstrong was and should be treated with the same reverence.
  • Gubbo: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.

    Self Loading Freight.

    /To be fair the early astronauts, Russian and American, were just passengers. IIRC the first Mercury capsules didn't even have controls.

    The story is that the fight over just having a window was a make or break issue.

    Sheppard didn't have a window. The second Mercury flight, with Grissom, got a window. So Gus was the first American to actually see space.

    You are, of course and always, wrong.

    https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-​objects/capsule-mercury-mr-3/nasm_A196​20021000

    Though you will claim correctness as they are described as technically portholes and a periscope


    I was quoting an article posted to Fark a couple of days ago.

    The second US mission to space went to Grissom, however. He would largely repeat the first Mercury flight with two key modifications-the Liberty Bell 7 capsule would have a trapezoid-shaped window, and a new explosive hatch would allow Grissom to exit the spacecraft on his own. To blow the hatch, Grissom had to remove a cap from the detonator, pull out a safety pin, and push down on a plunger.
    The flight itself was splendid. As Grissom became the first American to directly view the Earth from space, he marveled at his home planet. "The view through the window became quite spectacular as the horizon came into view," he said in his flight report. "The sight was truly breathtaking. The Earth was very bright, the sky was black, and the curvature of the Earth was quite prominent.
    "

    If they got it wrong then fair enough.
  • Carter Pewterschmidt: Gubbo: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.

    Self Loading Freight.

    /To be fair the early astronauts, Russian and American, were just passengers. IIRC the first Mercury capsules didn't even have controls.

    The story is that the fight over just having a window was a make or break issue.

    Sheppard didn't have a window. The second Mercury flight, with Grissom, got a window. So Gus was the first American to actually see space.

    You are, of course and always, wrong.

    https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-​objects/capsule-mercury-mr-3/nasm_A196​20021000

    Though you will claim correctness as they are described as technically portholes and a periscope

    I was quoting an article posted to Fark a couple of days ago.

    The second US mission to space went to Grissom, however. He would largely repeat the first Mercury flight with two key modifications-the Liberty Bell 7 capsule would have a trapezoid-shaped window, and a new explosive hatch would allow Grissom to exit the spacecraft on his own. To blow the hatch, Grissom had to remove a cap from the detonator, pull out a safety pin, and push down on a plunger.
    The flight itself was splendid. As Grissom became the first American to directly view the Earth from space, he marveled at his home planet. "The view through the window became quite spectacular as the horizon came into view," he said in his flight report. "The sight was truly breathtaking. The Earth was very bright, the sky was black, and the curvature of the Earth was quite prominent."

    If they got it wrong then fair enough.


    Is it a psychological issue that you're entirely unable to admit error?

    Even in very simple things.
  • Gubbo: Carter Pewterschmidt: Gubbo: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.

    Self Loading Freight.

    /To be fair the early astronauts, Russian and American, were just passengers. IIRC the first Mercury capsules didn't even have controls.

    The story is that the fight over just having a window was a make or break issue.

    Sheppard didn't have a window. The second Mercury flight, with Grissom, got a window. So Gus was the first American to actually see space.

    You are, of course and always, wrong.

    https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-​objects/capsule-mercury-mr-3/nasm_A196​20021000

    Though you will claim correctness as they are described as technically portholes and a periscope

    I was quoting an article posted to Fark a couple of days ago.

    The second US mission to space went to Grissom, however. He would largely repeat the first Mercury flight with two key modifications-the Liberty Bell 7 capsule would have a trapezoid-shaped window, and a new explosive hatch would allow Grissom to exit the spacecraft on his own. To blow the hatch, Grissom had to remove a cap from the detonator, pull out a safety pin, and push down on a plunger.
    The flight itself was splendid. As Grissom became the first American to directly view the Earth from space, he marveled at his home planet. "The view through the window became quite spectacular as the horizon came into view," he said in his flight report. "The sight was truly breathtaking. The Earth was very bright, the sky was black, and the curvature of the Earth was quite prominent."

    If they got it wrong then fair enough.

    Is it a psychological issue that you're entirely unable to admit error?

    Even in very simple things.


    I quoted a reputable source, one that had a Fark thread a couple of days ago. As I said, if they got it wrong then fair enough.

    As for not admitting you got something wrong you didn't even know there were pro-EU Tory MPs....

    And when I told you there were you deflected.....

    So it's rather rich for you to criticise someone else for "refusing to admit" they made a mistake. Or do you now admit you were wrong and there were in fact lots of pro-EU Tory MPs?

    At least my "mistake" was quoting a reputable source in good faith.
  • Carter Pewterschmidt: Gubbo: Carter Pewterschmidt: Gubbo: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.

    Self Loading Freight.

    /To be fair the early astronauts, Russian and American, were just passengers. IIRC the first Mercury capsules didn't even have controls.

    The story is that the fight over just having a window was a make or break issue.

    Sheppard didn't have a window. The second Mercury flight, with Grissom, got a window. So Gus was the first American to actually see space.

    You are, of course and always, wrong.

    https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-​objects/capsule-mercury-mr-3/nasm_A196​20021000

    Though you will claim correctness as they are described as technically portholes and a periscope

    I was quoting an article posted to Fark a couple of days ago.

    The second US mission to space went to Grissom, however. He would largely repeat the first Mercury flight with two key modifications-the Liberty Bell 7 capsule would have a trapezoid-shaped window, and a new explosive hatch would allow Grissom to exit the spacecraft on his own. To blow the hatch, Grissom had to remove a cap from the detonator, pull out a safety pin, and push down on a plunger.
    The flight itself was splendid. As Grissom became the first American to directly view the Earth from space, he marveled at his home planet. "The view through the window became quite spectacular as the horizon came into view," he said in his flight report. "The sight was truly breathtaking. The Earth was very bright, the sky was black, and the curvature of the Earth was quite prominent."

    If they got it wrong then fair enough.

    Is it a psychological issue that you're entirely unable to admit error?

    Even in very simple things.

    I quoted a reputable source, one that had a Fark thread a couple of days ago. As I said, if they got it wrong then fair enough.

    As for not admitting you got something wrong you didn't even know there were pro-EU Tory MPs....

    And when I told you there were you deflected.....

    So it's rather rich for you to criticise someone else for "refusing to admit" they made a mistake. Or do you now admit you were wrong and there were in fact lots of pro-EU Tory MPs?

    At least my "mistake" was quoting a reputable source in good faith.


    So the answer to my question is "yes". Yes you have an issue with admitting wrongness.

    I mean, it's not like people didn't know that.
  • Gubbo: Carter Pewterschmidt: Gubbo: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: Carter Pewterschmidt: snocone: "payload"? The proper term is spam in a can.

    Self Loading Freight.

    /To be fair the early astronauts, Russian and American, were just passengers. IIRC the first Mercury capsules didn't even have controls.

    The story is that the fight over just having a window was a make or break issue.

    Sheppard didn't have a window. The second Mercury flight, with Grissom, got a window. So Gus was the first American to actually see space.

    You are, of course and always, wrong.

    https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-​objects/capsule-mercury-mr-3/nasm_A196​20021000

    Though you will claim correctness as they are described as technically portholes and a periscope

    I was quoting an article posted to Fark a couple of days ago.

    The second US mission to space went to Grissom, however. He would largely repeat the first Mercury flight with two key modifications-the Liberty Bell 7 capsule would have a trapezoid-shaped window, and a new explosive hatch would allow Grissom to exit the spacecraft on his own. To blow the hatch, Grissom had to remove a cap from the detonator, pull out a safety pin, and push down on a plunger.
    The flight itself was splendid. As Grissom became the first American to directly view the Earth from space, he marveled at his home planet. "The view through the window became quite spectacular as the horizon came into view," he said in his flight report. "The sight was truly breathtaking. The Earth was very bright, the sky was black, and the curvature of the Earth was quite prominent."

    If they got it wrong then fair enough.

    Is it a psychological issue that you're entirely unable to admit error?

    Even in very simple things.


    Says the person who didn't know what height the regular GPS constellation is orbiting at, and when I corrected  him said he was going to put me on his ignore list.
  • AAAAGGGGHHHH: NOW watch the number of reserved flights on these Space Party Limos to get cancelled en masse. Why pay a sh*tload and risk death if you aren't allowed to swagger & brag about it at the Influencer Gala?

    Imagine Kanye West emerging from the capsule and immediately saying that he's now of the same "Right Stuff" as Gagarin and Armstrong was and should be treated with the same reverence.


    Fark user imageView Full Size
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