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  • Cortez the Killer: Speaking of poisonous plants for consumption, I've been contemplating trying poke salad. It won't be this year, as the plants I've seen on the trails where I walk the dog have withered. I'm a little scared to try them, as I'm just the kind of guy that cooks really well, but can fark things up (yes, I like to have plenty of wine when I cook.

    If any advice is to be had, I'll take it.



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    They quit canning it, not out of caution, but low demand.
    I like poke salat.
    Me and Tony Joe White.

    Tony Joe White - Polk Salad Annie
    Youtube JyXHxh3Sye0
  • olrasputin: anuran: olrasputin: "There are several reports over the centuries of people eating spotted water hemlock and reporting that it has a sweet and pleasant flavor not unlike a wild carrot. While even tiny amounts of spotted water hemlock can be deadly, consumption does not always result in death"

    A few people in Oregon die from eating what they think is wild parsnip.....

    They get quite a few cases of "I ate this fancy-looking wild mushroom and my liver exploded" up there too, don't they?


    If I remember correctly, it usually happens because of newly-arrived immigrants who mistake death cap mushrooms for an edible variety that they used to harvest in the old country.
  • Datura flowers smell like chocolate. Feel free to eat some on top of your next bowl of ice cream, let us know what happens.
  • J.R. 'Bob' Chinaski: Datura flowers smell like chocolate. Feel free to eat some on top of your next bowl of ice cream, let us know what happens.


    Only use I have for Datura flowers is for the Spiritual Journey in Fallout New Vegas - the Yao Guai paw weapon is kinda cool, but heavy AF.
  • NINEv2: gas giant: But f*ckit, here comes Claire!

    She's a bit... dim isn't she?


    definitely not the sharpest hammer in the bag?

    FrancoFile: The only reason they started eating this up in the hollers was they had literally nothing else.


    on Cape Cod one of the constant staples of poor grad students is wild ramps. at least they're pretty hard to mistake anything else for it, plus they are farking delicious. ('course the PFAS/PFOA/PFOS runoff from Otis AFB makes everydamnthing a bit suspect lol)
  • makerofbadjokes: J.R. 'Bob' Chinaski: Datura flowers smell like chocolate. Feel free to eat some on top of your next bowl of ice cream, let us know what happens.

    Only use I have for Datura flowers is for the Spiritual Journey in Fallout New Vegas - the Yao Guai paw weapon is kinda cool, but heavy AF.


    this is why I prefer Fart In A Jar from Saints Row 3.

    /judges also would have accepted the duck grenade from Crackdown 2.
  • olrasputin: anuran: olrasputin: "There are several reports over the centuries of people eating spotted water hemlock and reporting that it has a sweet and pleasant flavor not unlike a wild carrot. While even tiny amounts of spotted water hemlock can be deadly, consumption does not always result in death"

    A few people in Oregon die from eating what they think is wild parsnip.....

    They get quite a few cases of "I ate this fancy-looking wild mushroom and my liver exploded" up there too, don't they?


    The PNW is one of the best places in the world to go mushroom hunting, so yes. People eat without properly keying the  mushrooms
  • J.R. 'Bob' Chinaski: Datura flowers smell like chocolate. Feel free to eat some on top of your next bowl of ice cream, let us know what happens.


    I know people who smoke datura. I ... don't.
  • J.R. 'Bob' Chinaski: Datura flowers smell like chocolate. Feel free to eat some on top of your next bowl of ice cream, let us know what happens.


    I nibbled on a couple flowers once; mildly intoxicating and vomit inducing. The potency is supposedly in the roots. I'm not that adventurous anymore.
  • Eh. If you eat green tomatoes you can eat tomato leaves, they both contain tomatine which is far less toxic than solanine. I've taken to tossing a tomato leaf or two into a pot of spaghetti sauce as it simmers, then taking it out at the end along with the bay leaf. It brings back some of the fresh flavor that's otherwise lost in hours of cooking and I've never experienced or had reports of any problems digestion-wise.

    I'll draw the line at actually consuming the leaves in any quantity, though. There are many better options for pesto.
  • MrSplifferton: "I love the smell of tomato leaves. I think they're summery and seductive-so much so that I often douse myself in a tomato leaf-scented perfume"

    What in the actual fark?  I'm sure she is exhausting to be around.


    This is the only part of the article I came close to agreeing with.  That didn't get to be too much until the "perfume college" line right after that.
  • MrSplifferton: "I love the smell of tomato leaves. I think they're summery and seductive-so much so that I often douse myself in a tomato leaf-scented perfume"

    What in the actual fark?  I'm sure she is exhausting to be around.


    I love the smell also...but mostly because I associate it with the delicious fruit that's soon to follow.
  • EasilyDistracted: MrSplifferton: "I love the smell of tomato leaves. I think they're summery and seductive-so much so that I often douse myself in a tomato leaf-scented perfume"

    What in the actual fark?  I'm sure she is exhausting to be around.

    I love the smell also...but mostly because I associate it with the delicious fruit that's soon to follow.


    Eh, after being pressed to work in our sizeable garden as a kid (several acres), I still associate tomato plant smell with those farking giant hornworms.
  • MrSplifferton: "I love the smell of tomato leaves. I think they're summery and seductive-so much so that I often douse myself in a tomato leaf-scented perfume"

    What in the actual fark?  I'm sure she is exhausting to be around.


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  • olrasputin: anuran: olrasputin: "There are several reports over the centuries of people eating spotted water hemlock and reporting that it has a sweet and pleasant flavor not unlike a wild carrot. While even tiny amounts of spotted water hemlock can be deadly, consumption does not always result in death"

    A few people in Oregon die from eating what they think is wild parsnip.....

    They get quite a few cases of "I ate this fancy-looking wild mushroom and my liver exploded" up there too, don't they?


    One of the most deadliest mushrooms--the Death Cap--also tastes delicious according to the people who have eaten it and survived. Way too many people harvest and eat wild mushrooms without knowing what the hell they're eating.
  • fasahd: J.R. 'Bob' Chinaski: Datura flowers smell like chocolate. Feel free to eat some on top of your next bowl of ice cream, let us know what happens.

    I nibbled on a couple flowers once; mildly intoxicating and vomit inducing. The potency is supposedly in the roots. I'm not that adventurous anymore.


    It depends on the species and a lot of other conditions like age, weather, and location. With some species, it's higher in the flowers and seeds. With others, it's the roots.
  • eyeq360: fasahd: J.R. 'Bob' Chinaski: Datura flowers smell like chocolate. Feel free to eat some on top of your next bowl of ice cream, let us know what happens.

    I nibbled on a couple flowers once; mildly intoxicating and vomit inducing. The potency is supposedly in the roots. I'm not that adventurous anymore.

    It depends on the species and a lot of other conditions like age, weather, and location. With some species, it's higher in the flowers and seeds. With others, it's the roots.


    Castaneda was fun reading. Don Juan had to mash the roots into a paste and have Carlos rub it on his temples with lizards. It's been too long. Anyway, Indian folk lore isn't the best scientific source.
  • fasahd: eyeq360: fasahd: J.R. 'Bob' Chinaski: Datura flowers smell like chocolate. Feel free to eat some on top of your next bowl of ice cream, let us know what happens.

    I nibbled on a couple flowers once; mildly intoxicating and vomit inducing. The potency is supposedly in the roots. I'm not that adventurous anymore.

    It depends on the species and a lot of other conditions like age, weather, and location. With some species, it's higher in the flowers and seeds. With others, it's the roots.

    Castaneda was fun reading. Don Juan had to mash the roots into a paste and have Carlos rub it on his temples with lizards. It's been too long. Anyway, Indian folk lore isn't the best scientific source.


    For certain things involving plants, like for medicinal purposes, I wouldn't dismiss what's being said completely. There's usually some scientific basis for it. Like using foxglove for heart problems.

    Like with datura, a lot of traditional cultures have been using it for hundreds of years and they're likely to have a good understanding of proper dosage and how to use it reasonably safe without killing or seriously harming the user.

    I'd rather trust them than Castaneda, as he was a liar and a fraud who lied about pretty much everything.
  • eyeq360: For certain things involving plants, like for medicinal purposes, I wouldn't dismiss what's being said completely. There's usually some scientific basis for it. Like using foxglove for heart problems.

    Like with datura, a lot of traditional cultures have been using it for hundreds of years and they're likely to have a good understanding of proper dosage and how to use it reasonably safe without killing or seriously harming the user.

    I'd rather trust them than Castaneda, as he was a liar and a fraud who lied about pretty much everything.


    If you say that a flying saucer landed in your yard last night you would need to prove it. If you say that you 'saw' a flying saucer land in your yard last night, others have to disprove your perception. As far as I know, the bulk of his work is still classified as non-fiction by the library of congress. I enjoy his writing, YMMV.
  • Eat what you want, but I'm gonna pass.
  • Never feed your dog tomato greens. That is all.
  • gas giant: The worst part of harvesting tomatoes is getting the sickly stench of the greenery on you. Along with the toxins, it's something that probably evolved for millions of years just keep mammals away from the only edible part of the plant.
    But f*ckit, here comes Claire!


    It's evolved to keep animals from eating the plant's solar energy gathering system. It wants animals to eat the fruit. That's the whole point of fruit.
  • Don't Troll Me Bro!: It's evolved to keep animals from eating the plant's solar energy gathering system. It wants animals to eat the fruit. That's the whole point of fruit.


    I know, I just wanted to drunkenly vent about my hatred of tomato leaf stench.
  • gas giant: Don't Troll Me Bro!: It's evolved to keep animals from eating the plant's solar energy gathering system. It wants animals to eat the fruit. That's the whole point of fruit.

    I know, I just wanted to drunkenly vent about my hatred of tomato leaf stench.


    Actually love the smell. It's like summer.

    Being said I'm aware it's a part of the nightshade family. And I ain't touching the rest of the plant. Just like I grow peppers, I'll eat the peppers. But I'm not touching the stems or leaves.

    That's just sheer idiocy.
  • Axeofjudgement: gas giant: Don't Troll Me Bro!: It's evolved to keep animals from eating the plant's solar energy gathering system. It wants animals to eat the fruit. That's the whole point of fruit.

    I know, I just wanted to drunkenly vent about my hatred of tomato leaf stench.

    Actually love the smell. It's like summer.

    Being said I'm aware it's a part of the nightshade family. And I ain't touching the rest of the plant. Just like I grow peppers, I'll eat the peppers. But I'm not touching the stems or leaves.

    That's just sheer idiocy.


    I love(d) the smell too, in my family's vegetals garden of childhood.

    and back then I never understood why carrot-greens, beet turnip etc. greens, ok all of those we'd eat, but never tomato ones.

    so yeah.

    I cannot recall the exact book, but als-Kind I remember a cartoon of Napoleon going bonkers after eating melanzana/melitzana ("mad apples" aka eggplant) which scared me off aubergines pretty good for a long time ah tellyu whut.
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