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  • I read that book many times during 6th grade.  I should go back and reread it now.  Might take up part of an afternoon.
  • That's not what that phrase means
  • His name was Gary Paulsen
  • Jaesop: That's not what that phrase means


    It's a sex thing right?
  • Today I found out that apparently Hatchet was 1 book in a 5 book series. This is what I get for thinking elementary school assigned reading existed in a vacuum.
  • That's too bad, he wove enjoyable yarns.  This past weekend I was cleaning/clearing out one of the (now adult) kids' room and ran across a bunch of his books in a box of kids/YA books.  Yesterday the box was dropped off at the library for their used book sale. Hopefully they go to a good home and the next generation enjoys them as much as we did.

    /His adult book about dog sledding in Alaska was a good read too
  • LegacyDL: Today I found out that apparently Hatchet was 1 book in a 5 book series. This is what I get for thinking elementary school assigned reading existed in a vacuum.


    And in many cases, the sequels didn't exist when you were in elementary school.

    /I was almost intrigued enough to read them when I found out that there were sequels to The Giver.
  • LegacyDL: Today I found out that apparently Hatchet was 1 book in a 5 book series. This is what I get for thinking elementary school assigned reading existed in a vacuum.


    I had no clue there were more. Time to load up the kindle for the next time I'm stuck somewhere.
  • The only book of his I remember reading was 'The Rifle' in like 8th grade.
  • Of the five Gary Paulson's books I've read, they all followed a similar vein. Young person find themselves in the wilderness, gets absolutely shiat on by nature for half the book, they learn to cope and flourish with the madness, someone comes along to finally bring them back to civilization.

    That said, I love the genre. The Hatchet, The River, The Hay Meadow are all wonderful books you can polish off in an few hours. The Hatchet is a phenomenal book which taught me about the spirit of perseverance and improvisation. I still carry a hatchet in my car and a knife in  my pocket everywhere I go specifically because of those books.
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    Magua took the hatchet to color with blood. lt is still bright. Only when it is red, then it will be buried.
  • LegacyDL: Today I found out that apparently Hatchet was 1 book in a 5 book series. This is what I get for thinking elementary school assigned reading existed in a vacuum.


    Me too. I never realized there were sequels, that a story about a tiny ax could be termed a "saga."
  • I never read them, but I'm forever intrigued that he got so many letters not liking the ending of the first book (where Brian was rescued just before winter hit) that he wrote an "alternate ending" sequel where he wasn't rescued and had to survive the winter in the wilderness.
  • Fireproof: I never read them, but I'm forever intrigued that he got so many letters not liking the ending of the first book (where Brian was rescued just before winter hit) that he wrote an "alternate ending" sequel where he wasn't rescued and had to survive the winter in the wilderness.


    The problem most readers had with the ending wasn't that he was rescued... it's that it came out of freaking nowhere, in the space of about 5 paragraphs at the very end, right when it seemed that Brian was about to take a big step forward in his own development.

    The thing I always found bothersome was that in authors notes for Hatchet Paulson said that Brian would have had a very hard time in the winter, and likely would not have survived because of a lack of food, whereas in the sequal itself Brian does just fine, and actually has much more plentiful and better food.  That seemed like a strange contradiction.
  • Awww man, RIP Gary, you were my first favorite author, thanks for all the books that let me explore the wilderness without, you know, actually going outside. Somewhere at my mom's house, I've got a letter you were kind enough to send back to me when I was in elementary school and tasked with writing a favorite celebrity, it made my week, if not my month back then.

    /thinking on it, The Tent may have sowed the first seeds of my eventual break with my Evangelical upbringing
    //the dogsledding books were the best
    ///hatchet marks
  • phlegmjay: LegacyDL: Today I found out that apparently Hatchet was 1 book in a 5 book series. This is what I get for thinking elementary school assigned reading existed in a vacuum.

    Me too. I never realized there were sequels, that a story about a tiny ax could be termed a "saga."


    Ice bear knew.
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    Looking at the descriptions of the other books, I might have read the River, but none of the rest?

    But, the best book in this genre of "kid survives in the wilderness" has to be "My Side of the Mountain"...although he's not stuck in that one, just someone who hates the city, so unsure if it counts as the same genre thinking about it more.
  • Fireproof: LegacyDL: Today I found out that apparently Hatchet was 1 book in a 5 book series. This is what I get for thinking elementary school assigned reading existed in a vacuum.

    And in many cases, the sequels didn't exist when you were in elementary school.

    /I was almost intrigued enough to read them when I found out that there were sequels to The Giver.


    They're interesting enough but get increasingly surreal and trippy. And answer literally none of the questions you'd have.
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