Comments

  • pfffft. everybody knows the proper measurement for mayonnaise is by the mouthful.
  • I have measuring spoons like those, and they are great. I much prefer them to the many other iterations of measuring spoons I have laying about. But, the rationale that you need these because they're easier to fit into spice jars is ridiculous. If you're making recipes that call for a tablespoon of cinnamon you may want to rethink your baking skills.
  • propasaurus: I have measuring spoons like those, and they are great. I much prefer them to the many other iterations of measuring spoons I have laying about. But, the rationale that you need these because they're easier to fit into spice jars is ridiculous. If you're making recipes that call for a tablespoon of cinnamon you may want to rethink your baking skills.


    Meaning more or less cinnamon?
  •  
    I don't bake, therefore I don't measure anything. Fight me. Measure with your taste buds, not your spoons.

    /Again, not applicable to the crazy mad scientists known as bakers/pastry chefs
    //Mad respect for those that wish that hell upon themselves
  • propasaurus: I have measuring spoons like those, and they are great. I much prefer them to the many other iterations of measuring spoons I have laying about. But, the rationale that you need these because they're easier to fit into spice jars is ridiculous. If you're making recipes that call for a tablespoon of cinnamon you may want to rethink your baking skills.


    Yeah, she's got a point. The first couple of commenters, as well as subby, are completely clueless. I'm not sure about your weird cinnamon thing. There are other spices that people use a tablespoon of in recipes. These are extremely useful.

    151: I don't bake, therefore I don't measure anything. Fight me. Measure with your taste buds, not your spoons.

    /Again, not applicable to the crazy mad scientists known as bakers/pastry chefs
    //Mad respect for those that wish that hell upon themselves


    It's not just baking. There is an actual science to cooking. Ingredients matter, and so can the ratio of ingredients. If you don't measure, then anyone who tells you that you're some kind of spectacular cook is just being nice.
  • Mikey1969: propasaurus: I have measuring spoons like those, and they are great. I much prefer them to the many other iterations of measuring spoons I have laying about. But, the rationale that you need these because they're easier to fit into spice jars is ridiculous. If you're making recipes that call for a tablespoon of cinnamon you may want to rethink your baking skills.

    Yeah, she's got a point. The first couple of commenters, as well as subby, are completely clueless. I'm not sure about your weird cinnamon thing. There are other spices that people use a tablespoon of in recipes. These are extremely useful.

    151: I don't bake, therefore I don't measure anything. Fight me. Measure with your taste buds, not your spoons.

    /Again, not applicable to the crazy mad scientists known as bakers/pastry chefs
    //Mad respect for those that wish that hell upon themselves

    It's not just baking. There is an actual science to cooking. Ingredients matter, and so can the ratio of ingredients. If you don't measure, then anyone who tells you that you're some kind of spectacular cook is just being nice.


    This
  • 151: I don't bake, therefore I don't measure anything. Fight me. Measure with your taste buds, not your spoons.

    /Again, not applicable to the crazy mad scientists known as bakers/pastry chefs
    //Mad respect for those that wish that hell upon themselves


    That's right, folks, measure with your tastebuds. This is why the chefs at all the finest restaurants put all the ingredients in their mouths before cooking.
  • Add me to the list of people who don't measure spices (and half the time don't use a recipe).  By now I know what I do and don't like.  I just dump spice into the jar lid until it looks right, then dump it into the pan.
  • ImOscar: 151: I don't bake, therefore I don't measure anything. Fight me. Measure with your taste buds, not your spoons.

    /Again, not applicable to the crazy mad scientists known as bakers/pastry chefs
    //Mad respect for those that wish that hell upon themselves

    That's right, folks, measure with your tastebuds. This is why the chefs at all the finest restaurants put all the ingredients in their mouths before cooking.


    Would a chef at a fine dining place let anything go out without tasting it at some point in the process?
  •  
    Baking by weight changed my life.  I don't have to clean a bunch of measuring cups and spoons.  Everything goes in one pot.  You can weigh liquids as easily as you can weigh solids.  Online recipes are increasingly including conversions to metric, which makes everything that much easier.  And for the rest, a simple cheat sheet is enough to do the conversions.  And once you do a recipe once, and write it down, it's infinitely repeatable, down to the gram.

    Using weight instead of volume also eliminates some major sources of error in baking.  Compacted flour can be up to twice as dense as sifted flour.  Kosher salt weighs about 1/2 as much as the same volume of iodized salt.  Fats like lard and butter are almost impossible to measure reliably by volume, unless you can do it in major units like a stick or half-stick.  All of these problems go away if you measure in grams.
  • Mikey1969: propasaurus: I have measuring spoons like those, and they are great. I much prefer them to the many other iterations of measuring spoons I have laying about. But, the rationale that you need these because they're easier to fit into spice jars is ridiculous. If you're making recipes that call for a tablespoon of cinnamon you may want to rethink your baking skills.

    Yeah, she's got a point. The first couple of commenters, as well as subby, are completely clueless. I'm not sure about your weird cinnamon thing. There are other spices that people use a tablespoon of in recipes. These are extremely useful.

    151: I don't bake, therefore I don't measure anything. Fight me. Measure with your taste buds, not your spoons.

    /Again, not applicable to the crazy mad scientists known as bakers/pastry chefs
    //Mad respect for those that wish that hell upon themselves

    It's not just baking. There is an actual science to cooking. Ingredients matter, and so can the ratio of ingredients. If you don't measure, then anyone who tells you that you're some kind of spectacular cook is just being nice.


    By all  means, based on that tagline, please explain to me what my views are on using measuring spoons in the kitchen.
  • I love my narrow measuring spoons.  I've given sets to other people, too.

    For those people who say to measure by taste- how are you supposed to make something for the first time?

    If you you're following a recipe from a cookbook or TV, you need to establish a baseline, and that requires actually following a recipe.  Sure, your spices might be a bit old, and not quite right, but you won't know it by tasting spices that you're using for the first time.

    Follow the instructions as best you can (if you have to substitute difficult to find ingredients), and then figure out how to customize it from there.

    If you want to mock Claire, mock her for raving about something that she's ordered but hasn't actually used.
  • Subby shiats on this Claire woman but submits a link to one of her blog posts....uh...
  • olrasputin: By all  means, based on that tagline, please explain to me what my views are on using measuring spoons in the kitchen.


    Well, to begin with, you are either incapable of reading, didn't bother to read your own farking article, or did read it, and just wanted to get an easy green.

    Second, these measuring spoons have a definite use, which you are obviously attacking the concept of in your headline.

    Weird that I have to explain your own words to you.
  • BunchaRubes: Subby shiats on this Claire woman but submits a link to one of her blog posts....uh...


    Claire's attracted some dedicated hate-watchers. I didn't understand the appeal until the article about her MSG Martinis. It was equal parts horrifying and fascinating.
  • BunchaRubes: Subby shiats on this Claire woman but submits a link to one of her blog posts....uh...


    That's how we shiat on Claire around here.  She's in on the game or she wouldn't be so Claire all the time.
  • MusicMakeMyHeadPound: BunchaRubes: Subby shiats on this Claire woman but submits a link to one of her blog posts....uh...

    Claire's attracted some dedicated hate-watchers. I didn't understand the appeal until the article about her MSG Martinis. It was equal parts horrifying and fascinating.


    You can't spell Claire without ire.
  • ImOscar: That's right, folks, measure with your tastebuds. This is why the chefs at all the finest restaurants put all the ingredients in their mouths before cooking.


    I think the point is taste as you go, like chefs do.

    Savory cooking is much more forgiving than baking so if you're pretty comfortable in the kitchen, then measuring by eye/feel is perfectly normal.  But there's nothing wrong with whipping out the measuring spoons/cups either.


    Oneiros: For those people who say to measure by taste- how are you supposed to make something for the first time?


    I mean if you're following a recipe I wouldn't recommend straying from measuring things.  It's more when you're improvising.


    BunchaRubes: Subby shiats on this Claire woman but submits a link to one of her blog posts....uh...


    Yeah, the fark food tab seems to collectively hate Claire, while also probably being her biggest source of clicks.
  • Mikey1969: propasaurus: I have measuring spoons like those, and they are great. I much prefer them to the many other iterations of measuring spoons I have laying about. But, the rationale that you need these because they're easier to fit into spice jars is ridiculous. If you're making recipes that call for a tablespoon of cinnamon you may want to rethink your baking skills.

    Yeah, she's got a point. The first couple of commenters, as well as subby, are completely clueless. I'm not sure about your weird cinnamon thing. There are other spices that people use a tablespoon of in recipes. These are extremely useful.

    151: I don't bake, therefore I don't measure anything. Fight me. Measure with your taste buds, not your spoons.

    /Again, not applicable to the crazy mad scientists known as bakers/pastry chefs
    //Mad respect for those that wish that hell upon themselves

    It's not just baking. There is an actual science to cooking. Ingredients matter, and so can the ratio of ingredients. If you don't measure, then anyone who tells you that you're some kind of spectacular cook is just being nice.


    How did I know I wasn't going to enjoy this article. I must be claireavoidant. Yeah, my dried oregano is a little stale, so when it calls for a tablespoon, I carefully measure out two. No, I do it by taste. That's what makes a good cook. Of course a professional chef would only have fresh ingredients, but if they were meticulous they would be measuring by weight. they also have more leeway when its a recipe for dozens of servings. How big are Claire's spoons if she can't fit them in a mayonnaise jar?
  • Nuuu: Baking by weight changed my life.  I don't have to clean a bunch of measuring cups and spoons.  Everything goes in one pot.  You can weigh liquids as easily as you can weigh solids.  Online recipes are increasingly including conversions to metric, which makes everything that much easier.  And for the rest, a simple cheat sheet is enough to do the conversions.  And once you do a recipe once, and write it down, it's infinitely repeatable, down to the gram.

    Using weight instead of volume also eliminates some major sources of error in baking.  Compacted flour can be up to twice as dense as sifted flour.  Kosher salt weighs about 1/2 as much as the same volume of iodized salt.  Fats like lard and butter are almost impossible to measure reliably by volume, unless you can do it in major units like a stick or half-stick.  All of these problems go away if you measure in grams.


    Agree completely. Another point worth mentioning is that you can easily scale the recipe (formula) up or down and have consistent results. I got into this method when I started baking breads 25ish years ago.

    When I want pancakes I can make one large or 3 small and don't have any batter left over. I'm usually cooking for just myself and it works. I usually make scrambled eggs with my pancakes and toss the remaining 1/2 egg in there.

    About the measuring spoons... In the article she's worried about spilling spices she's measuring out. Okay, but unless your jar is half full, in the process of wedging those rectangular spoons into the jar some of the spices are going to spill out. Also, how are you leveling off the measuring spoons without spilling some? I suppose you could shake the spoon inside the jar to level it out but unless the jar is half empty there is going to be spillage. If you are that concerned about being messy measure over the sink or trashcan. If the concern is about wasting spices measures over a sheet of paper then  pour spillage back into the jar.

    When I clicked on the links in the article for the measuring spoons the one for Williams Sonoma went to a set of standard cups and ROUND  spoons. She also reported the spoon sets linked cost "around $10-$20" but, when you find the rectangular set of spoons on Williams Sonoma, they are  $22.95. I guess 'around' $23 is 'around' $20. Whatever...
  •  
    In this thread: people that are not chefs telling a chef how to be a chef

    Fight me. With your plastic little spoons. If you can't tell the difference between a tsp and a tbsp with your eyes, then use your spoons, little amateur home cook. Till then, foh
  • Nuuu: Baking by weight changed my life.  I don't have to clean a bunch of measuring cups and spoons.  Everything goes in one pot.  You can weigh liquids as easily as you can weigh solids.  Online recipes are increasingly including conversions to metric, which makes everything that much easier.  And for the rest, a simple cheat sheet is enough to do the conversions.  And once you do a recipe once, and write it down, it's infinitely repeatable, down to the gram.

    Using weight instead of volume also eliminates some major sources of error in baking.  Compacted flour can be up to twice as dense as sifted flour.  Kosher salt weighs about 1/2 as much as the same volume of iodized salt.  Fats like lard and butter are almost impossible to measure reliably by volume, unless you can do it in major units like a stick or half-stick.  All of these problems go away if you measure in grams.


    I also converted to baking by weight although I still use measuring spoons for things like spices when I bake. When I cook, I add seasonings according to taste.

    I got myself a good but inexpensive kitchen scale when I started making my own personal care products (allergy to very common preservatives in commercial products) and weighing by the gram not only made it accurate, it made it easy to develop my own formulas. I then decided to lose weight and started weighing my food to get a reasonably accurate calorie count. 100+ lb. gone 5 years ago. It was a natural progression to weighing ingredients for baking since I was already doing it for cooking.
  • This is an ad for oblong spoons, that's all.
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