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  • Original Tweet:

  • For the record, the first US digital recording, live and on vinyl:
    Virgil Fox - "The Digital Fox" (Full Album)
    Youtube c_wLErgOWQM


    From whisper to thunder and everything in between, you can't beat Virgil Fox's Heavy Organ.
  • felching pen: For the record, the first US digital recording, live and on vinyl:
    [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/c_wLErgOWQM]

    From whisper to thunder and everything in between, you can't beat Virgil Fox's Heavy Organ.


    Can't he just beat it himself?
  • felching pen: For the record, the first US digital recording, live and on vinyl:
    [iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/c_wLErgOWQM?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsapi=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&widgetid=1]

    From whisper to thunder and everything in between, you can't beat Virgil Fox's Heavy Organ.


    Pete Schwetti would like a word.
  • My uncle is a former DJ from LA and he's one of those guys. He's also stone deaf. Your hearing degrades as you age, but he's been to so many concerts in his day he can't hear shiat anymore now that he's in his 70's. But you go over to his house and he has thousands of dollars of audio equipment, and he'll trot out whatever new purchase he has to show off and play it way too loud for you. He's the kind of guy who will spend $800 on speaker cables and $8000 on a record player.

    As a general rule of thumb, if I meet someone under the age of 35 who says they can hear the difference between analog and a high end digital recording, I'm inclined to believe them. But if you're an old fark like me? Uh-uh. You can't hear shiat.
  • Plug the electrical signal from a good turntable into an A/D converter and burn it to a CD. Then play back both the turntable and the CD into an ABX switch box. Challenge the audiophile to tell you which one is playing each time.

    If and only if they can do significantly better than random chance at distinguishing the sources, then you can proceed to the followup question of asking which technology they prefer.
  • Do good amps make a good signal? Yes. Are they better than shiatty amps? Yes. Is there a point of diminishing returns with amps? Absolutely.

    Do good speakers present the music in a way that is more like what the mixing engineer intended? Absolutely. Are they better than shiatty speakers? Oh my God yes. Is there a point of diminishing returns with speakers? Yes.

    Can these things make it possible to tell the difference between analog or digital recordings? LoL no. But they play a critical role in getting the imaging and staging that the mixing engineer actually created through volume and panning.

    Are people listening to their music in a way that presents the music that way? Not really.
  • felching pen: For the record, the first US digital recording, live and on vinyl:
    [iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/c_wLErgOWQM?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsapi=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&widgetid=1]

    From whisper to thunder and everything in between, you can't beat Virgil Fox's Heavy Organ.


    I have a copy of his "The Fox Touch - Volume One" that was direct to disk (LP) by Crystal Clear Records from 1977.  Haven't listened to it in years but I may fire up the turntable and bring back memories.  Didn't realize that they made a separate digital recording - sort of like Sheffield Labs did a backup analog recording of their direct to disk LP recordings decades ago and used that to release CDs.

    As for me all of my MoFi LPs were sourced from the original analog tapes and mastered by the late Stan Ricker, and I haven't purchased any new vinyl in decades.

    Wonder if they used the Soundstream digital recorder - that was what Telarc used with their recordings around that time.  There was some ruckus on the audiophile group on Reddit about MoFi but ignored it until now.  May take a peak.
  • thats why i use the best monster cables from best buy
  • Oh...that's bull shait. Some of the best pressings of "Telcarc" discs....which you play on turn tables.
    Are "Digtial" recorded.
    This was well before the 'digital music' craze.
    In face some of the better performances of classical music on vinyl can be had with the "telarc" "digital" discs.

    The Stravinsky, 1912 overture, Debussy, and Holst. Are some standout recording from that company that released 'digital' recordings on vinyl. (they where mastered digitally and then cut to disc from the digital master.    tape)
    Very good discs.
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  • optikeye: Oh...that's bull shait. Some of the best pressings of "Telcarc" discs....which you play on turn tables.
    Are "Digtial" recorded.
    This was well before the 'digital music' craze.
    In face some of the better performances of classical music on vinyl can be had with the "telarc" "digital" discs.

    The Stravinsky, 1912 overture, Debussy, and Holst. Are some standout recording from that company that released 'digital' recordings on vinyl. (they where mastered digitally and then cut to disc from the digital master.    tape)
    Very good discs.
    [Fark user image 850x1213]



    I love me some Telarc. Everything they did was superbly recorded, even the Erich Kunzel version of 1812, although it was a lackluster performance. The 1958 Mercury recording of Antal Dorati's 1812 (with West Point cannons and Philadelphia carillon) is a great recording of a great performance by comparison.

    But Telarc touted their 100% digital recordings for years, and they all sound wonderful. All the Telarc recordings are well worth the time to track down and listen to.
  • question_dj: Do good amps make a good signal? Yes. Are they better than shiatty amps? Yes. Is there a point of diminishing returns with amps? Absolutely.

    Do good speakers present the music in a way that is more like what the mixing engineer intended? Absolutely. Are they better than shiatty speakers? Oh my God yes. Is there a point of diminishing returns with speakers? Yes.

    Can these things make it possible to tell the difference between analog or digital recordings? LoL no. But they play a critical role in getting the imaging and staging that the mixing engineer actually created through volume and panning.

    Are people listening to their music in a way that presents the music that way? Not really.


    Well, if you're listening to music that's the modern day equivalent of Captain and Tenell.
    You probably can't tell the diffrence.
  • Ginnungagap42: But Telarc touted their 100% digital recordings for years, and they all sound wonderful. All the Telarc recordings are well worth the time to track down and listen to.


    Another worth tracking down is a "Stravinsky Conducts Stravinsky"
    It's a little odd hearing his versions as he seems to hold back a bit for the rites of spring and other bits like the firebird kettle drums, and lead into the the finale. But some bits are very good....but hey, he wrote it.
  •  "They were completely deceitful," says Richard Drutman, 50, a New York City filmmaker who has purchased more than 50 of MoFi's albums over the years. "I never would have ordered a single Mobile Fidelity product if I had known it was sourced from a digital master."

    Oh COME ON. You couldn't spot the difference because there was no difference.
  • Thoreny: "They were completely deceitful," says Richard Drutman, 50, a New York City filmmaker


    FILM MAKER. PLEASE. I bet the closest this guy has ever got to 'film' is a waxy build up on his bathroom floor.
    That's deceitful. MISTER "FILM" maker.
  • Ah, people who don't understand nyquist rate, aka audiophiles.
  • Give me Furtwangler and the Berlin Phil anytime.

    Thanks.
  • Never had more than a $200 stereo, and as long as the record sounds all right, I'm okay with them.


    / imho, though, "Straight Outta Compton" sounded like it was recorded through a wall
  • Wood says that MoFi decided to add DSD not for convenience but because its engineers felt they could help improve their records. He remembers hearing MoFi's reissue of Santana's "Abraxas" in 2016. "My mind was blown when we got the test pressings back," he said.

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  • NateAsbestos: thats why i use the best monster cables from best buy


    I bought a couple monster cables for my bass rig. I didn't buy them for the sound quality, I bought them for the durability. Going on 20 years and hundreds of gigs with those cables.
  • Lsherm: My uncle is a former DJ from LA and he's one of those guys. He's also stone deaf. Your hearing degrades as you age, but he's been to so many concerts in his day he can't hear shiat anymore now that he's in his 70's. But you go over to his house and he has thousands of dollars of audio equipment, and he'll trot out whatever new purchase he has to show off and play it way too loud for you. He's the kind of guy who will spend $800 on speaker cables and $8000 on a record player.

    As a general rule of thumb, if I meet someone under the age of 35 who says they can hear the difference between analog and a high end digital recording, I'm inclined to believe them. But if you're an old fark like me? Uh-uh. You can't hear shiat.


    Always wore protection
    I have 5 turntables.
    And a 20 x 16 room with shelves of records.
    And tape.
    I just picked up a mars hotel on 8 track
  • marksman: NateAsbestos: thats why i use the best monster cables from best buy

    I bought a couple monster cables for my bass rig. I didn't buy them for the sound quality, I bought them for the durability. Going on 20 years and hundreds of gigs with those cables.


    For most set ups. "Monster Cables" are useless. They do have a good build quality.
    However. large grade copper cables do have a similar transmission quality of signal. Just like you wouldn't use that super thin magnet wire for your head phone.
    Using a larger gauge of wire for larger amperage is useful for signal transmission.
    Does it have to be brand name....nope, but having it shielded is a good thing in some cases.
    You can pick up large gauged speaker wire by the spool at home depot for cheep.
  • question_dj: Can these things make it possible to tell the difference between analog or digital recordings?


    Depends on what you mean. Alot of these audiophile types are full of crap and just fooling themselves but you can tell the difference under the right conditions. In my short stint in college (I couldn't afford it) I want to school for sound engineering and they were still teaching analog recording. If you were in a studio and listened to a recording straight off of tape and then a digitized copy of the same recording in the same studio, you'd hear the difference. It's subtle but it's there. But I seriously doubt someone would be able to tell the difference from a vinyl pressed from a digital master run that's been run through a tube preamp versus an analog master on vinyl.
  • Billy Liar: Never had more than a $200 stereo, and as long as the record sounds all right, I'm okay with them.


    / imho, though, "Straight Outta Compton" sounded like it was recorded through a wall


    That's fine if it works for you. Now, tell me, what processor and LCD screen do you use, if you squint hard enough the resolution doesn't look TOO bad on a 90's style green screen CRT, and your phone?
    Do you use one of those fancy touchy screen on your pocket computer, why not use a 80's brick phone.....as long as it makes calls it's okay right?
  • vudukungfu: Lsherm: My uncle is a former DJ from LA and he's one of those guys. He's also stone deaf. Your hearing degrades as you age, but he's been to so many concerts in his day he can't hear shiat anymore now that he's in his 70's. But you go over to his house and he has thousands of dollars of audio equipment, and he'll trot out whatever new purchase he has to show off and play it way too loud for you. He's the kind of guy who will spend $800 on speaker cables and $8000 on a record player.

    As a general rule of thumb, if I meet someone under the age of 35 who says they can hear the difference between analog and a high end digital recording, I'm inclined to believe them. But if you're an old fark like me? Uh-uh. You can't hear shiat.

    Always wore protection
    I have 5 turntables.
    And a 20 x 16 room with shelves of records.
    And tape.
    I just picked up a mars hotel on 8 track


    Look, it doesn't matter. Your hearing depends on hair cells that degrade over time. The don't regenerate, and that's why humans eventually go deaf if they manage to live long enough. It's a depleting resource. You can't hear something better at 50 than you could at 20. It's a physical impossibility.
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