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  • After a robust campaign, Te Pati Māori, the political party representing New Zealand's indigenous Polynesian people, announced it has collected 70,000 signatures on a petition to change the country's name to "Aotearoa."

    Isn't it already? English and Māori are both official languages there. In English the country is called 'New Zealand' and in Te Reo Māori its name is 'Aotearoa.' That's how I understand it to be. Is that incorrect?
  • There's a small, noisy segment of NZers who think that a lot of problems can be solved if everybody learned Te Reo (speak Maori). They see name changes as a wedge strategy towards that aim.

    Two major obstacles:

    1) Hardly anyone has the time to devote an hour a day or whatever to learn a new language. Most people have a dozen other items on their list of Things I'd Do In My Spare Time

    2) What do you gain? I'd be surprised if there was a single Maori in NZ who was not a fluent English speaker, and would rather use an understandable language rather than listen to a Pakeha try to stumble through a conversation in Te Reo.
  • I wonder if anyone will have the audacity to ask if "The Shire" should be given equal consideration.
  • Read that as 'Long White Castle Islands' and thought it would be such a magical place
  • fragMasterFlash: I wonder if anyone will have the audacity to ask if "The Shire" should be given equal consideration.


    The residents of Tookland and Hardbottle agree...

    /course the people of Tookland are a little iffy in the head..
  • It'll be up there with Czechia and Türkiye in no time.

    /to be fair, I do like the way they weave Te Reo Maori into the vernacular.
  • Gordon Bennett: After a robust campaign, Te Pati Māori, the political party representing New Zealand's indigenous Polynesian people, announced it has collected 70,000 signatures on a petition to change the country's name to "Aotearoa."

    Isn't it already? English and Māori are both official languages there. In English the country is called 'New Zealand' and in Te Reo Māori its name is 'Aotearoa.' That's how I understand it to be. Is that incorrect?


    To some people it doesnt matter. Its like the idiots who say you should do things in the dumbest possible way because "its tradition", even though the world moved past that long ago. The real thing people never consider with this is the huge cost associated with reprinting EVERYTHING in the country just to make a minority happy. Billions that could be spent on things that are actually useful and make life better for the country would be spent on time and materials to reprint every textbook, sign, map, and anything else. It cost canada a billion dollars back in the 80s to switch to metric, this switch would probably cost NZ two or three times that
  • In Australia, we call it the Land of the Long White Dole Queue.
  • mjjt: noisy segment of NZers


    I bet they're All Blacks
  • I would say in my experience here in Auckland Aotearoa has been used interchangeably with New Zealand (or along with it) for the last 20 years, and most people view it as a dual official name. A few old farkers have a problem. Maybe there are different views down south especially in Christchurch?

    I would not expect any major internal issues with making it the primary name, but might cause a fair bit of complexity with international relations/trade/travel I guess?
  • englaja: In Australia, we call it the Land of the Long White Dole Queue.


    3.2% unemployment, lower than Oz in fact...
  • gaspode: englaja: In Australia, we call it the Land of the Long White Dole Queue.

    3.2% unemployment, lower than Oz in fact...



    "Dole" is the name of their sexiest sheep.
  • mjjt: There's a small, noisy segment of NZers who think that a lot of problems can be solved if everybody learned Te Reo (speak Maori). They see name changes as a wedge strategy towards that aim.

    Two major obstacles:

    1) Hardly anyone has the time to devote an hour a day or whatever to learn a new language. Most people have a dozen other items on their list of Things I'd Do In My Spare Time

    2) What do you gain? I'd be surprised if there was a single Maori in NZ who was not a fluent English speaker, and would rather use an understandable language rather than listen to a Pakeha try to stumble through a conversation in Te Reo.


    No one thinks having te reo in common use will solve a lot of problems. That's a strawman argument (look it up).

    Rebutting your comment #1: You did not poll all 5 million Kiwis to determine everyone's amount of spare time. And if your reasoning is that "you don't know ANYONE who wants to learn te reo", then your sample size is too small.

    As for your comment #2: I don't know how to unpack that. The push for more te reo in New Zealand society isn't about English vs. te reo. It's about adding to our nation's culture by supporting and celebrating Maori culture as a part of our country.

    Te reo won't replace anything in New Zealand.... It will ADD to it.
  • englaja: In Australia, we call it the Land of the Long White Dole Queue.


    wow! racist much?

    Australia won't pay unemployment or retirement benefits to any New Zealanders... even if they lived in the country for years.

    Sorry to have to tell you this, englaja, but you live in a shiatty country.
  • mjjt: There's a small, noisy segment of NZers who think that a lot of problems can be solved if everybody learned Te Reo (speak Maori). They see name changes as a wedge strategy towards that aim.

    Two major obstacles:

    1) Hardly anyone has the time to devote an hour a day or whatever to learn a new language. Most people have a dozen other items on their list of Things I'd Do In My Spare Time

    2) What do you gain? I'd be surprised if there was a single Maori in NZ who was not a fluent English speaker, and would rather use an understandable language rather than listen to a Pakeha try to stumble through a conversation in Te Reo.


    Counterpoint:  The cohort that collectively flipped their shiat when diacritics were added to Taupo and other names on road signs and mountains were 'renamed' (even though they was actually just an additions or expansions or corrections), and OMG 'Wahine on toilets whatever next, I don't know what that means, I might tinkle in the wrong loo dearie', and I can't believe Radio New Zealand has the temerity to use Te Reo etc etc etc.  If anything, the fact the petition got to 70k, just highlights the changing of the guard between the young and the old in NZ
  • Concrete Donkey: Gordon Bennett: After a robust campaign, Te Pati Māori, the political party representing New Zealand's indigenous Polynesian people, announced it has collected 70,000 signatures on a petition to change the country's name to "Aotearoa."

    Isn't it already? English and Māori are both official languages there. In English the country is called 'New Zealand' and in Te Reo Māori its name is 'Aotearoa.' That's how I understand it to be. Is that incorrect?

    To some people it doesnt matter. Its like the idiots who say you should do things in the dumbest possible way because "its tradition", even though the world moved past that long ago. The real thing people never consider with this is the huge cost associated with reprinting EVERYTHING in the country just to make a minority happy. Billions that could be spent on things that are actually useful and make life better for the country would be spent on time and materials to reprint every textbook, sign, map, and anything else. It cost canada a billion dollars back in the 80s to switch to metric, this switch would probably cost NZ two or three times that


    There's a slight flaw with your argument, in that it might not be the minority anymore.  It would certainly be interesting if it went to a referendum.
  • Gordon Bennett: After a robust campaign, Te Pati Māori, the political party representing New Zealand's indigenous Polynesian people, announced it has collected 70,000 signatures on a petition to change the country's name to "Aotearoa."

    Isn't it already? English and Māori are both official languages there. In English the country is called 'New Zealand' and in Te Reo Māori its name is 'Aotearoa.' That's how I understand it to be. Is that incorrect?


    It's a widely accepted name, but not by all Māori. Aotearoa did not originally refer to the entire country, just the North Island. But it does have a de facto status because although it's not an official name, usually when 'New Zealand' is translated into Māori, Aotearoa is used. Nuu Tirani is also a possible translation for New Zealand but isn't much used
  • englaja: In Australia, we call it the Land of the Long White Dole Queue.


    Comedy Company - 'Colin Carpenter'...(1 of 3)
    Youtube ylnHNt7EX7o
  • Concrete Donkey: Gordon Bennett: After a robust campaign, Te Pati Māori, the political party representing New Zealand's indigenous Polynesian people, announced it has collected 70,000 signatures on a petition to change the country's name to "Aotearoa."

    Isn't it already? English and Māori are both official languages there. In English the country is called 'New Zealand' and in Te Reo Māori its name is 'Aotearoa.' That's how I understand it to be. Is that incorrect?

    To some people it doesnt matter. Its like the idiots who say you should do things in the dumbest possible way because "its tradition", even though the world moved past that long ago. The real thing people never consider with this is the huge cost associated with reprinting EVERYTHING in the country just to make a minority happy. Billions that could be spent on things that are actually useful and make life better for the country would be spent on time and materials to reprint every textbook, sign, map, and anything else. It cost canada a billion dollars back in the 80s to switch to metric, this switch would probably cost NZ two or three times that


    Stop thinking Maori, their culture, and language are inferior to yours. Do that and the racism in your heart will melt away. And you will be a better person.
  • gaspode: I would say in my experience here in Auckland Aotearoa has been used interchangeably with New Zealand (or along with it) for the last 20 years, and most people view it as a dual official name. A few old farkers have a problem. Maybe there are different views down south especially in Christchurch?


    Is using Aotearoa for the South Island and whole country like replacing one bit of historical revisionism with a newer version?  The South Islanders could take that as their part isn't as important as the North Island.

    A Pacific Islander I know said the names for the land are often wrong because the ancient terms now used for the islands were about how to get there, not the place.  It is about the journey, not the destination.
  • Ragin' Asian: [Fark user image image 425x238]


    🎶 it's fun to stay at the
  • Holy crap, now I've seen it all.  Only us Muricans are supposed to be short sighted, provincial, and ready to fight over minutiae at moment's notice.

    Who knew there were furriners on Fark?  Now, we have to start acting right and hide our lack of home training.
  • I mean they branded it New Zealand (interestingly the iPad doesn't recognize it when swiping out "Zealand") without even creating Old Zealand. Pompous Brits...
  • DON.MAC: gaspode: I would say in my experience here in Auckland Aotearoa has been used interchangeably with New Zealand (or along with it) for the last 20 years, and most people view it as a dual official name. A few old farkers have a problem. Maybe there are different views down south especially in Christchurch?

    Is using Aotearoa for the South Island and whole country like replacing one bit of historical revisionism with a newer version?  The South Islanders could take that as their part isn't as important as the North Island.

    A Pacific Islander I know said the names for the land are often wrong because the ancient terms now used for the islands were about how to get there, not the place.  It is about the journey, not the destination.


    If a decision needs to be made about the most appropriate Maori name to use given the obvious need for a name for the whole country I would ask what is the position of Maori on the whole. And it is almost indisputable that there is very very wide support for this name. If there is actual disagreement among Maori on this then it is up to them to raise and discuss it, but I do not believe this to be the case. Language evolves as situations evolve and other languages than English are allowed to do so.

    However pretty much all talk about it being not the right name comes from non-Maori, and in fact mostly from the right and from groups and people hardly sympathetic to Maori culture. Its pretty telling.
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