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  • Americans never really got soccer too.

    At the same, compared to other countries, we have football, baseball, basketball, etc.., and what do they got? Soccer.
  • And not a single mention of a group of rag tag prisoners of war led by their former boxing champion turned goalie taking down the German National team during WW2.

    /Too obscure?
  • That time is right now.   All we have to do is not lose to Iran and hope that England scores more v Wales than against us, and Wales doesn't score anymore against anyone.   Easy!

    /checks groups
    //makes sure Trinidad and Tobago are not in any of them.
    ///If teem weeaboo can beat Germany, anything is possible.
  • Stud Gerbil: That time is right now.   All we have to do is not lose to Iran and hope that England scores more v Wales than against us, and Wales doesn't score anymore against anyone.   Easy!

    /checks groups
    //makes sure Trinidad and Tobago are not in any of them.
    ///If teem weeaboo can beat Germany, anything is possible.


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  • The US made it to the semifinal in 1930, beating Mexico 4-1 and Belgium 3-0 to get there. And every single player on their team played on an American professional club side.

    /I've always wondered what soccer in the US could have been like if the professional leagues of the 30's had been more popular.
  • It's called 'before the World Cup started'.
  • ralanprod: And not a single mention of a group of rag tag prisoners of war led by their former boxing champion turned goalie taking down the German National team during WW2.

    /Too obscure?


    It was a nice VICTORY!
  • kdawg7736: Americans never really got soccer too.

    At the same, compared to other countries, we have football, baseball, basketball, etc.., and what do they got? Soccer.


    I feel like the rest of the world needs some major sport that Americans just can't get good at no matter how much money they put into it. Although can you imagine if some of the NBA guys like Dwayne Wade or Kevin Durant had gotten steered toward soccer instead?
  • kdawg7736: Americans never really got soccer too.

    At the same, compared to other countries, we have football, baseball, basketball, etc.., and what do they got? Soccer.


    Cricket and Rugby come to mind.
  • Yeah, but was there a time anyone cared about it?
  • majestic: ralanprod: And not a single mention of a group of rag tag prisoners of war led by their former boxing champion turned goalie taking down the German National team during WW2.

    /Too obscure?

    It was a nice VICTORY!


    It was a great film too.
  • LOL be serious, no there wasn't.

    That win is STILL talked about as possibly the biggest upset in World Cup history.

    They finished last in their group that year and weren't even competitive in either of their other two games.

    The closest the US has ever been to being a serious World Cup co tender was 1930. The only other times they've really done anything notable was 2002 when a Torsten Frings handball that was missed on the goal line kept them from a tie. Then even advancing in 1994 was seen as a miracle, to say nothing of holding Brazil to a 1-0 score line.
  • ralanprod: And not a single mention of a group of rag tag prisoners of war led by their former boxing champion turned goalie taking down the German National team during WW2.

    /Too obscure?


    We've all seen The Longest Yard.
  • ralanprod: And not a single mention of a group of rag tag prisoners of war led by their former boxing champion turned goalie taking down the German National team during WW2.

    /Too obscure?


    No, no, they tied the Germans. And the boxing "champion"? Yeah, he actually lost his first title fight. And somehow he was granted a rematch (which would never happen today). I guess he won that although the end of that fight was total garbage.
  • "With the exception of the politics, this was that. I mean, a plucky group of underdogs just beat what was generally universally recognized as the best team in the world,"

    You forgot the part where in 1982 the match was for Olympic gold while in 1950 it was a first round, group match with the US still coming last in their group. It was a huge upset, but it was very different from 1982.
  • The Third Man: The US made it to the semifinal in 1930, beating Mexico 4-1 and Belgium 3-0 to get there. And every single player on their team played on an American professional club side.

    /I've always wondered what soccer in the US could have been like if the professional leagues of the 30's had been more popular.


    Go back a little further, the US all but adopted a version of soccer instead of rugby.

    In 1874, Harvard was the lone holdout from adopting soccer as the US intercollegiate sport. McGill University was the only one willing to play them as they played a variant of rugby. They adopted parts of the McGill game (including the oblong ball) combined with Harvard's rules and over time convince the rest of the schools to play a rugby based game that turned into American football.

    Meanwhile McGill went home and led in the parallel development of Canadian football.
  • kdawg7736: Americans never really got soccer too.

    At the same, compared to other countries, we have football, baseball, basketball, etc.., and what do they got? Soccer.


    Those are the only four sports in the World, and three of them are only allowed in USA.
  • Ken VeryBigLiar: kdawg7736: Americans never really got soccer too.

    At the same, compared to other countries, we have football, baseball, basketball, etc.., and what do they got? Soccer.

    I feel like the rest of the world needs some major sport that Americans just can't get good at no matter how much money they put into it. Although can you imagine if some of the NBA guys like Dwayne Wade or Kevin Durant had gotten steered toward soccer instead?


    Which is why soccer is popular.
  • dywed88: The Third Man: The US made it to the semifinal in 1930, beating Mexico 4-1 and Belgium 3-0 to get there. And every single player on their team played on an American professional club side.

    /I've always wondered what soccer in the US could have been like if the professional leagues of the 30's had been more popular.

    Go back a little further, the US all but adopted a version of soccer instead of rugby.

    In 1874, Harvard was the lone holdout from adopting soccer as the US intercollegiate sport. McGill University was the only one willing to play them as they played a variant of rugby. They adopted parts of the McGill game (including the oblong ball) combined with Harvard's rules and over time convince the rest of the schools to play a rugby based game that turned into American football.

    Meanwhile McGill went home and led in the parallel development of Canadian football.


    Hey, you've read the book I'm writing!

    /probably will be done in 2027 at this rate
  • The Third Man: dywed88: The Third Man: The US made it to the semifinal in 1930, beating Mexico 4-1 and Belgium 3-0 to get there. And every single player on their team played on an American professional club side.

    /I've always wondered what soccer in the US could have been like if the professional leagues of the 30's had been more popular.

    Go back a little further, the US all but adopted a version of soccer instead of rugby.

    In 1874, Harvard was the lone holdout from adopting soccer as the US intercollegiate sport. McGill University was the only one willing to play them as they played a variant of rugby. They adopted parts of the McGill game (including the oblong ball) combined with Harvard's rules and over time convince the rest of the schools to play a rugby based game that turned into American football.

    Meanwhile McGill went home and led in the parallel development of Canadian football.

    Hey, you've read the book I'm writing!

    /probably will be done in 2027 at this rate


    I just love to joke that the reason Americans don't play soccer is because of some Canadians.
  • When? In 1946 when one third of Europe's prime aged men were dead and the rest were rebuilding from the ashes of WWII?
  • tenth tier sport. no one with any athletic ability would play. it is like being on the olympic bobsled team, not much competition to make the team. most people with a bit of talent would prefer to be in minor league baseball.
  • The Third Man: dywed88: The Third Man: The US made it to the semifinal in 1930, beating Mexico 4-1 and Belgium 3-0 to get there. And every single player on their team played on an American professional club side.

    /I've always wondered what soccer in the US could have been like if the professional leagues of the 30's had been more popular.

    Go back a little further, the US all but adopted a version of soccer instead of rugby.

    In 1874, Harvard was the lone holdout from adopting soccer as the US intercollegiate sport. McGill University was the only one willing to play them as they played a variant of rugby. They adopted parts of the McGill game (including the oblong ball) combined with Harvard's rules and over time convince the rest of the schools to play a rugby based game that turned into American football.

    Meanwhile McGill went home and led in the parallel development of Canadian football.


    Hey, you've read the book I'm writing!

    /probably will be done in 2027 at this rate


    Is that bit right? I have it in my head that funny shaped balls weren't introduced to AF and rugby until the early 20th century.

    Might be conflating that with forward passing being introduced to AF, which, IIRC, happened around 1909 or so.
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