Comments

  • Maybe I download the apps and then maybe never connect the devices.

    Maybe I perform deliberately make searches for made up shiat interspersed with legit shiat?

    Maybe my data is good data?  Maybe it's not?
  • I'm dumb. I don't want my appliances to try and pull rank
  • mistahtom: Maybe I download the apps and then maybe never connect the devices.

    Maybe I perform deliberately make searches for made up shiat interspersed with legit shiat?

    Maybe my data is good data?  Maybe it's not?


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  • Oh no, I'm not connecting them, I know where all this "smart home" stuff leads:

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  • I had an ESL lesson with a student in China today, and he told me about a sci-fi/comedy short film he saw over the weekend. A robot vacuum gradually learned to predict messes, and then started figuring out who made the messes and punishing them for not cleaning up their own messes.
  • On one side, you have people who just want to plug something in and have it work. I grew up setting clocks on microwaves and VCRs when that was the questionable feature of the day. On another you have people who see the compromises they have to make; the regular security issues found with giving a farking light bulb access to your wifi network.

    In the middle, you have people who see convenience in being able to put their lights on a timer or have them detect when they're in a room without having to rewire anything to do it through other means, people who like being able to connect to YouTube or Netflix through their TV, and somehow even people who see value in playing mobile games on their refrigerator. The one "smart" device I've ever connected to a network is a portable air conditioner, so I can turn it on a bit before I get home in the hotter months and check how long it's been since I've cleaned the filter. Both of those are easily addressed through a $5-10 timer plug and just marking my calendar, but I went through the trouble to put it on its own island of a network, far away from any of the stuff I care about, just because I decided to be weirdly lazy in this one situation.

    Honestly, half seems a bit high. People are lazy about all sorts of shiat, resistant to being pushed into optional setup processes by overcomplicated appliances that ought to just ding and to the thing like the last five or six boxes that quietly handled that role, and if they know the score, they know the Internet of Things is a parasitic data-mining scheme that only rarely benefits the owner of a Thing.
  • KB202: I had an ESL lesson with a student in China today, and he told me about a sci-fi/comedy short film he saw over the weekend. A robot vacuum gradually learned to predict messes, and then started figuring out who made the messes and punishing them for not cleaning up their own messes.


    I played a documentary on that:
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  • KB202: I had an ESL lesson with a student in China today, and he told me about a sci-fi/comedy short film he saw over the weekend. A robot vacuum gradually learned to predict messes, and then started figuring out who made the messes and punishing them for not cleaning up their own messes.


    Roombo: First Blood

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  • "...the appliances will be more smart than they"
  • I cannot think of a single use case for a smart connected kitchen or bathroom appliance that is remotely worth the extra cost or complexity (e.g. chance of something breaking).  Until my washing machine can load itself having it connected to an app is completely useless.
  • The microwave doesn't need internet access. I'll set its clock by myself, or just ignore it. It's not 1985, I have like four other devices that know what time it is, at least one of which I have on me basically all the time.
  • I was forced to connect my Samsung clothes washer, so it could update to avoid catching on fire.  How a device full of water catches on fire is beyond me.  I am a senior network engineer.  It took most of an hour to get the thing to connect, and another 1/2 hour to get it disconnected again afterwards. (Procedure not listed by Samsung anywhere) It required me to enable location sharing from my phone to connect to my new (fake) Samsung account.

    The companies obviously didn't care that users don't want smart devices, but keep jamming that crap in anyway.
  • ... i'm going to guess that it's actually people who don't care about, or don't even know about, connected features on the devices.
  • cakersq: It required me to enable location sharing from my phone to connect to my new (fake) Samsung account.


    This is one that pisses me off. You used to configure a Google Chromecast with Chrome and it worked fine. Now it takes an app that requires location sharing.
  • Nullav: On one side, you have people who just want to plug something in and have it work. I grew up setting clocks on microwaves and VCRs when that was the questionable feature of the day. On another you have people who see the compromises they have to make; the regular security issues found with giving a farking light bulb access to your wifi network.

    In the middle, you have people who see convenience in being able to put their lights on a timer or have them detect when they're in a room without having to rewire anything to do it through other means, people who like being able to connect to YouTube or Netflix through their TV, and somehow even people who see value in playing mobile games on their refrigerator. The one "smart" device I've ever connected to a network is a portable air conditioner, so I can turn it on a bit before I get home in the hotter months and check how long it's been since I've cleaned the filter. Both of those are easily addressed through a $5-10 timer plug and just marking my calendar, but I went through the trouble to put it on its own island of a network, far away from any of the stuff I care about, just because I decided to be weirdly lazy in this one situation.

    Honestly, half seems a bit high. People are lazy about all sorts of shiat, resistant to being pushed into optional setup processes by overcomplicated appliances that ought to just ding and to the thing like the last five or six boxes that quietly handled that role, and if they know the score, they know the Internet of Things is a parasitic data-mining scheme that only rarely benefits the owner of a Thing.


    Microwaves mostly had a clock for convenience, though some also had a timer function. VTRs had them because they were often heavily advertised as "time-shifters" so you could record that episode of Columbo while you're at work and watch it later. A lot of people never used these features, but then a lot of people did. I used to program VTRs all the time, especially late-night programs that I didn't want to stay awake for, or if i was going to be out when a show was on. After they got cheap enough i got a DVD recorder instead, then a DVR card for my PC. I haven't cared about cable or broadcast TV for years and years so I haven't bothered with any of that in a long time.

    But IoT? Hell no. The average 'smart' device is 30% spyware to sell you targeted ads, 10% some useless feature like sending a notification to your phone if you're out of ice cream or your clothes wash cycle finished, and 60% security vulnerabilities. I have a couple smart devices (try finding a not-smart TV anymore) and they're lobotomized: they do their basic non-smart functions and nothing more. Anything with cameras or other sensors (game consoles, etc) get unplugged when they're not in use. I work in IT and I know I'm not a security expert, so rather than try to mitigate the vulnerabilities inherent in IoT, i just avoid them entirely. I'm perfectly capable of manually checking my refrigerator for the current ice cream level, or the washing machine 2 hours after the 2-hour wash cycle is done. I don't need apps for that.
  • cakersq: I was forced to connect my Samsung clothes washer, so it could update to avoid catching on fire.  How a device full of water catches on fire is beyond me.

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  • sensitive yet dangerous: your clothes wash cycle finished


    ooooh.. this reminds me, i need to get my application server back up and see if the framework i built out of a non-smart dryer and a smart wall plug is capable of notifying me of laundry completion still.

    it was neat having a computer in the house yell at me that the laundry was done and remind me until i went and cleared it.

    i also need to figure out what to do with all the early era smart devices that have been cut off from the world since their services went under.
  • transporter_ii: cakersq: It required me to enable location sharing from my phone to connect to my new (fake) Samsung account.

    This is one that pisses me off. You used to configure a Google Chromecast with Chrome and it worked fine. Now it takes an app that requires location sharing.


    I just upgraded my Chromecast. The new one not only require that app (Googlehome) but the remote is also voice activated so it is listening to you.
  • cakersq: The companies obviously didn't care that users don't want smart devices, but keep jamming that crap in anyway.


    Management is banking on customers buying consumables and service based on spam sent through these apps.  Then you better believe that the smart appliance app is going to try to nudge you to buy specific brands of things you might be out of in order to gin up ad revenue.
  • Nullav: On one side, you have people who just want to plug something in and have it work. I grew up setting clocks on microwaves and VCRs when that was the questionable feature of the day. On another you have people who see the compromises they have to make; the regular security issues found with giving a farking light bulb access to your wifi network.

    In the middle, you have people who see convenience in being able to put their lights on a timer or have them detect when they're in a room without having to rewire anything to do it through other means, people who like being able to connect to YouTube or Netflix through their TV, and somehow even people who see value in playing mobile games on their refrigerator. The one "smart" device I've ever connected to a network is a portable air conditioner, so I can turn it on a bit before I get home in the hotter months and check how long it's been since I've cleaned the filter. Both of those are easily addressed through a $5-10 timer plug and just marking my calendar, but I went through the trouble to put it on its own island of a network, far away from any of the stuff I care about, just because I decided to be weirdly lazy in this one situation.

    Honestly, half seems a bit high. People are lazy about all sorts of shiat, resistant to being pushed into optional setup processes by overcomplicated appliances that ought to just ding and to the thing like the last five or six boxes that quietly handled that role, and if they know the score, they know the Internet of Things is a parasitic data-mining scheme that only rarely benefits the owner of a Thing.


    The only thing I would like on my WIFI would be my thermostat.  I like to program it so, like you, it goes on and turns on the air conditioning a little before I get home, turn it down a little after I go to bed with some timing variations on the weekend.  Same in the winter but just opposite.  Doing this on the thermostat is  PIA.  It would be nice to have a form I can populate that I can access from a computer to do this.  That does NOT mean I want my thermostat to "learn" my temperature preferences and decide when to take over temperature controls.
  • We have a IoT thermostat that came with the HVAC system. I could get other stuff to work off the same "system" but I'd have to pay a monthly fee.
    Oh.
    Hell.
    No.

    The last washer we purchased was an electromechanical Speed Queen. To replace a piece of crap which rhymes with Swirlpool. It was a "smart-ish" washer in that it didn't have an internet connection, but had all these fancy features which didn't work and we quickly abandoned the "smart" cycles for standard ones. Same with the dryer, but the dryer at least has kept working and is serviceable.

    The washer had a main circuit board that wasn't well protected against water. In a machine that is designed to sling water around inside itself.

    If I do any IoT stuff, I'll get a friend who builds his own systems using Raspberry Pi and Arduino to help me.
  • ITT: A bunch of self-congratulatory luddites who will be first against the wall when the sentient toasters take control.
  • Muta: The only thing I would like on my WIFI would be my thermostat.  I like to program it so, like you, it goes on and turns on the air conditioning a little before I get home, turn it down a little after I go to bed with some timing variations on the weekend.  Same in the winter but just opposite.  Doing this on the thermostat is  PIA.  It would be nice to have a form I can populate that I can access from a computer to do this.  That does NOT mean I want my thermostat to "learn" my temperature preferences and decide when to take over temperature controls.


    The original web app for our smart thermostat was horrid. It was actually easier to program the thermostat on the thermostat itself. The phone app originally wasn't much better, but they vastly improved it. I haven't looked at the web app in years. Trane brand, used to be called Nexia.
  • My oven is "smart" and I like being able to preheat it or adjust the temperature remotely, and have the timer chime on my phone. That allows me to adjust it from my backyard home office where I otherwise can't hear it.

    Same with my smart doorbell. I have chimes wherever I want them and can use the camera to see who it is.

    My smart lightbulbs do a good job simulating someone being home when I'm away.

    All are on an isolated and dedicated guest wifi network, and none really are able to collect any data I care about.

    I'm not saying it's perfect, but close enough for my needs. A few other things are connected to it (roomba, Traeger grill, front door lock...) but never a phone or tablet

    I'm ok with smart electronics - but I only enable those that are giving me some benefit. My dishwasher will tell me when it's done or when it needs more rinse aid (there's also a light on the thing itself) and that does nothing for me so it was not ever enabled.
  • I mean sure, you COULD go the manufacturer's website to look up any problems you might have with a product, but wouldn't you rather install an app on your phone and give GE or Samsung 24/7 access to your location, texts, camera and microphone?
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