Comments

  • I like my babies like I like my gas, unleaded.
  • Guess what? There's a limit for other stuff like arsenic and mercury too.

    Extra Freedom Bonus: There's stuff that we don't have limits for AT ALL that are banned in the EU. Look up polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) which have been identified as a carcinogen. EU has limits for human consumption in the parts per BILLION and we have nothing.

    Same deal for ethylene oxide, which is a common fumigant for shipping. EU has identified it as a substance for which there is no safe limit for consumption, not even tested for in the US outside of specific circumstances
  • "Zero" isn't really a thing in chemistry. When you start with 6.02*10^23 atoms of something, a few of them will always end up in unwanted places. The best you can do is say "below the X parts-per-billion detection limit of this test".

    And the "no safe amount of this substance" only means that they're using a linear model where higher doses cause proportionately more harm. There is still a negligible level below which the threat from the chemical is less significant than the threat of eating a cheeseburger or crossing the street.
  • If you completely deprive babies of lead then they'll start knocking.
  • talkertopc: If you completely deprive babies of lead then they'll start knocking.


    Well obviously if you switch to unleaded baby food, you should use 87 octane or higher.

    Of course this is Fark, so the babby should be able to run on E85.
  • Klivian: Guess what? There's a limit for other stuff like arsenic and mercury too.

    Extra Freedom Bonus: There's stuff that we don't have limits for AT ALL that are banned in the EU. Look up polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) which have been identified as a carcinogen. EU has limits for human consumption in the parts per BILLION and we have nothing.

    Same deal for ethylene oxide, which is a common fumigant for shipping. EU has identified it as a substance for which there is no safe limit for consumption, not even tested for in the US outside of specific circumstances


    I've wondered how you can go into a Wal-Mart with 10,000 products and they don't reek of manufacturing smells.
  • sinko swimo: Klivian: Guess what? There's a limit for other stuff like arsenic and mercury too.

    Extra Freedom Bonus: There's stuff that we don't have limits for AT ALL that are banned in the EU. Look up polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) which have been identified as a carcinogen. EU has limits for human consumption in the parts per BILLION and we have nothing.

    Same deal for ethylene oxide, which is a common fumigant for shipping. EU has identified it as a substance for which there is no safe limit for consumption, not even tested for in the US outside of specific circumstances

    I've wondered how you can go into a Wal-Mart with 10,000 products and they don't reek of manufacturing smells.


    They've got large, well-ventilated stores with high ceilings.

    On certain aisles, I'm sure it's noticeable.
  • We didn't let ours eat store bought baby food. We bought a baby food mill. FARK usually makes fun of and derides organic food, but we bought our babies organic. If we couldn't afford organic sweet potatoes for the whole family, the S.O. and I had standard sweet potatoes and we bought organic for the babies. We refused to buy "organic" from WalMart and that proved to be a smart move. We also tracked news reports of other businesses. We stopped shopping with any business that was reported to sell standard produce mislabeled as organic.

    Our kids had a teacher who claimed she had a pretty good idea of which families were eating organic at home and which ones weren't based on what was going on with the kids in the classroom. She stated that she taught for over a decade before the school had a  girl whose period started before age 12. Around 2001, they had an eight year old or two a year whose period started at school. She begun asking parents out of curiosity whether the child drank organic milk at home. She was still keeping that chart in 2012. None of those with such early periods were drinking organic milk. It wasn't a rigorous scientific study, but it was a bit more than one piece of evidence.
  • Bruscar: We stopped shopping with any business that was reported to sell standard produce mislabeled as organic.


    Guess what? There is no such thing as organic food because it is not a defined industry term.

    There is a common parlance where it is expected that organic food will be grown without pesticides or GMOs (got a whole other revelation for you on that) but because there is no legal guideline or regulation it is totally meaningless in the US. I can crunch out a #2 after only eating McDonalds and asbestos for  weeks straight and put that turd in cellophane and label it 100% organic.

    Your teacher has confirmation bias and was more likely just subconsciously tracking the kids from better off families. Those that can afford the more expensive groceries in theory will have a healthier diet overall, which will impact the onset of puberty.
  • Klivian: Bruscar: We stopped shopping with any business that was reported to sell standard produce mislabeled as organic.

    Guess what? There is no such thing as organic food because it is not a defined industry term.

    There is a common parlance where it is expected that organic food will be grown without pesticides or GMOs (got a whole other revelation for you on that) but because there is no legal guideline or regulation it is totally meaningless in the US. I can crunch out a #2 after only eating McDonalds and asbestos for  weeks straight and put that turd in cellophane and label it 100% organic.

    Your teacher has confirmation bias and was more likely just subconsciously tracking the kids from better off families. Those that can afford the more expensive groceries in theory will have a healthier diet overall, which will impact the onset of puberty.


    I'm sure the certifications are anything but perfect, but I'm not so cynical that I beleive that the United States government is engaging in deliberate, intentional, wholesale fraud. That said, I anticipated mockery on a site where only foods like a cheeto dressed hamburger between two waffles, slathered in mayo, and sprinkled in asbestos are considered acceptable dining. Anything healthier is deemed moonbat, woke, communist Voodoo. That's okay. Eat what you want. Don't worry about what we do or do not feed minors in our home.
  • Bruscar: Klivian: Bruscar: We stopped shopping with any business that was reported to sell standard produce mislabeled as organic.

    Guess what? There is no such thing as organic food because it is not a defined industry term.

    There is a common parlance where it is expected that organic food will be grown without pesticides or GMOs (got a whole other revelation for you on that) but because there is no legal guideline or regulation it is totally meaningless in the US. I can crunch out a #2 after only eating McDonalds and asbestos for  weeks straight and put that turd in cellophane and label it 100% organic.

    Your teacher has confirmation bias and was more likely just subconsciously tracking the kids from better off families. Those that can afford the more expensive groceries in theory will have a healthier diet overall, which will impact the onset of puberty.

    I'm sure the certifications are anything but perfect, but I'm not so cynical that I beleive that the United States government is engaging in deliberate, intentional, wholesale fraud. That said, I anticipated mockery on a site where only foods like a cheeto dressed hamburger between two waffles, slathered in mayo, and sprinkled in asbestos are considered acceptable dining. Anything healthier is deemed moonbat, woke, communist Voodoo. That's okay. Eat what you want. Don't worry about what we do or do not feed minors in our home.


    First time to visit the food tab, huh?

    It's cool. You can wander off while tightly clutching your preconceived notions about what a lot of us actually prefer to talk about here, and we'll keep our preconceived notion that you're in here spouting off about a bunch of crunchy granola woo.

    Or you could take a step back and realize that we're not against healthy food so much as bad science and what is often a thinly-veiled marketing scam.
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