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  • Depends what your degree is. If its an artsy degree then yeah but if its a degree with a shortage of workers then no, its a good investment.
  • Considering you can barely get a job pushing a broom these days without at least a BA, good luck
  • MaudlinMutantMollusk: Considering you can barely get a job pushing a broom these days without at least a BA, good luck


    Unless you go into a trade. My older brother works in heating and air conditioning installation and repair and is doing quite well. Same goes for a plumber friend of mine who is booked up for the next year on various jobs.
  • stupid subby... it's REALLY 4 out of 3.
  • Do these people think college is a bad investment in general or for themselves in particular. Because if it's the latter, I'll say 57% is way too low of a number. That journalism degree is really going to come in handy when you're living in a homeless camp thinly veiled as a protest. Just skip the student loan debt and spend an extra 4 years panhandling.
  • From a cost-benefit point-of-view, tuition money applied to a business venture might be a better investment.
  • It was technically a good investment for me because the wages I've earned since graduating and getting a job with my degree as a pre-req amount to more than the cost of tuition, books, lodging, etc... But if I had it to do all over again I would have gone into personal training.
  • miss diminutive: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Considering you can barely get a job pushing a broom these days without at least a BA, good luck

    Unless you go into a trade. My older brother works in heating and air conditioning installation and repair and is doing quite well. Same goes for a plumber friend of mine who is booked up for the next year on various jobs.


    You can also get up to a masters degree in HVAC.
  • TheHighlandHowler: From a cost-benefit point-of-view, tuition money applied to a business venture might be a better investment.


    Or the lotto. 40,000 quick picks a year, one of them has to win, right?
  • miss diminutive: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Considering you can barely get a job pushing a broom these days without at least a BA, good luck

    Unless you go into a trade. My older brother works in heating and air conditioning installation and repair and is doing quite well. Same goes for a plumber friend of mine who is booked up for the next year on various jobs.


    Came here to say pretty much this. There are plenty of ways to build a life. College is one of them. Trade school is another. Apprenticeship is another. Its too bad we are so obsessed on college. Unfortunately most wingnuts hate education no matter where it comes from.
  • Best 15 bucks I've ever spent.
  • TheHighlandHowler: From a cost-benefit point-of-view, tuition money applied to a business venture might be a better investment.

    Banks will loan you virtually unlimited amounts of money (backed by the taxpayers, of course) to throw away on a potentially worthless degree. (Note: I'm not saying all degrees are worthless. Some are, some aren't.) Getting the same bank to loan you the same amount of money to start a business would be virtually impossible for an 18 year-old with just a HS diploma and little or no credit.
  • I feel bad when I see people who took out thousands of dollars in student loans for University of Phoenix or DeVry or whatever. Bad idea jeans.
  • Point02GPA: Best 15 bucks I've ever spent.

    lol u went to collage
  • The idiots from Penn State who keep lionizing Paterno are exhibit A in the argument against a college education.
  • The nice part is that what these people think isn't too important in the face of real data.

    Short version: College remains a sound investment, particularly if you study the right subjects.
  • kxs401: I feel bad when I see people who took out thousands of dollars in student loans for University of Phoenix or DeVry or whatever. Bad idea jeans.

    Especially because they never figure out that UoP is skimming the chunk of student loan cash that's supposed to go towards "living expenses" rather than tuition.
  • TheHighlandHowler: From a cost-benefit point-of-view, tuition money applied to a business venture might be a better investment.

    Smart people, don't need to go to college. These are the people that naturally seek out knowledge, the types that can just pick up a book and learn how to do something. They will often learn things just for the sake of learning things. They could use that money to start a business in their garage. Or they just become an expert in some sort of trade. Somehow, they will figure out some way to be a success.

    // If they actually do go to college, it's because they're going into some field that absolutely requires a degree and some sort of other training. Like a surgeon.

    Not so smart people don't need to go to college. Because even if they do make it through college, they just become a not so smart person with a degree. They might know what they were taught, and know it well. But they aren't capable of (or inclined to) pick up new information. Often, their skills stagnate after a while and they get shucked off as things move toward the future.

    Somewhere in between those extremes are the people who can't just pick up a book and learn, BUT, aren't dumb as a sack of potatoes either. That's who college is for.
  • Great. Seven years of college down the drain.
  • Pffft. Rounding error
  • Learn your trades, Kids- I know Plumbing, Electrical, Sheetrock (repairing the damage when i do
    plumbing and electrical inside walls). I know basic electronics, how to solder, how to use a multimeter
    for diagnosing problems. I can cut and fabricate metals. I grew up in a lumberyard so i know a good deal
    about lumber. Skiinstructing is strictly a wintertime thing, as is captaining a tour boat during the summer.

    Not rich but having all these skills sure makes a difference in these tough times. not to mention that
    there's a good bit of fun randomly wrapped up in my year...
  • Like most things... if you research the market before investing time and money, you're more likely to get a positive return. That's why I only buy $20 scratch-offs at the lottery.
  • kxs401: I feel bad when I see people who took out thousands of dollars in student loans for University of Phoenix or DeVry or whatever. Bad idea jeans.


    Student loans are for later, you can't be worried about that stuff right now. Besides, I need a new car and 25% is a good interest rate. That means I get 75% off right?
  • Owangotang: The idiots from Penn State who keep lionizing Paterno are exhibit A in the argument against a college education.


    Absolutely. They are also exhibit B for some cleansing fire in Happy Valley.
  • B.S. in physics, M.S. in aerospace engineering. College was hands down the best investment I've ever made in my life. Without it, there is no way that I could do what I do, and I love what I do. In addition, the electives exposed me to anthropology/archaeology and ancient history, which have persisted as hobbies and reading interests decades after the original courses. I know other degrees and experiences can be different, but for me, college was a positive many times over. Were I to advise my younger self, I would recommend it again at quadruple the cost.
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