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  • in before the lock...

    i like pictures
  • I hadn't seen that one. It is an interesting image, and shows (in my opinion) the vulnerability of our infrastructure especially in older cities.
  • I'm looking forward to the powerful New Yorker Hurricane Sandy cartoon
  • Would like to mail this cover to every Republican who's a Global Warming denier.


    mit.zenfs.comView Full Size

  • Hey, I was in the upper right corner of that big dark spot. If you look closely, you can't see my house from here.
  • Time will tell who is stupid.
    In the mean time, it is obvious who is behaving stupidly.
  • I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.
  • If I lived in NYC, I would frame that.
  • There are many reasons for not stacking humans 20 million deep a few square miles.
    This one has been brought to you by Doc Obvious.
  • Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.


    You really don't understand how living in a city works, do you?

    Anyway, your perception of what happened seems to be pretty distorted. Most people were adequately prepared and did just fine. North of 39th Street it was business as usual. The only areas with real problems are the ones that were completely devastated, and you have similar issues in any disaster area.
  • Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.


    wow...

    you just don't get it do ya....

    well, the pacific plate seems to be warmin its diaper for a big load so you'll see soon enough...

    enjoy!
  • skinink: Would like to mail this cover to every Republican who's a Global Warming denier.
    [mit.zenfs.com image 567x756]


    Is this related? I'm not a Denier but I don't see how one storm proves a pattern.
  • apparently the east coast and new york and the first place in the world to ever experience a power outage due to a storm.
  • Ima4nic8or must be trolling, that's too much derp in one statement. And how many people only have cell phones and not home phones? I don't have a home line, only a cell phone. Luckily I kept all my previous phones because I had them all charging in case the power went out. The only concern is that the cell towers would go out of action as well, then I would be cut off.

    It was lucky that in Boston the hurricane seemed to be mostly a non event. I didn't even lose power.
  • Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.


    Plugging in the cell phones? Those phones are like the black plastic wall unit land lines people depended on in Charleston, SC after Hugo hit in 1989. Moreover, folks recieved vital news via news websites and Facebook on those phones.

    The fuel became an issue after public transit was halted and New Yorkers had to drive, assuming rhey had a car. Cabs needed fuel as did generators.
  • Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.


    The range of essential everyday survival skills changes over time. Hundreds of thousands of years ago you had to get your own food, so everyone had to know how to do that. These days, you have to know how to operate devices that let you know what's going on halfway across the globe in an instant. Someone else is making a living getting the food you previously had to hunt or farm yourself so the rest of the population doesn't have to. So that skill atrophies. Spearing a bison is a much less relevant skill to the modern American than knowing not to publish their credit card number on Facebook.
  • snocone: There are many reasons for not stacking humans 20 million deep a few square miles.
    This one has been brought to you by Doc Obvious.


    ==================

    There are even more reasons for not living in suburbs, places that have neither the benefits/charms of the country nor the city, but combine the downside of both.

    I suppose it makes more sense to live in a places that require massive inputs of fossil fuels and the wars, environmental destruction, and cultural/societal obliteration that goes along with it.
  • Fark Rye For Many Whores: skinink: Would like to mail this cover to every Republican who's a Global Warming denier.
    [mit.zenfs.com image 567x756]

    Is this related? I'm not a Denier but I don't see how one storm proves a pattern.


    i49.tinypic.comView Full Size


    what a Denier might look like...
  • "And how many people only have cell phones and not home phones?"

    Only the crazy folks. Cell phones are an unreliable, trendy luxury item. They are not really that good as a primary means of communication.
  • Ima4nic8or: I dont mean to be a dick but New Yorkers seem kind of pussy to me after this storm. I can understand being seriously depressed about the damage to your home, car, etc.. I can even understand not wanting a bunch of runners to come through right afterward. What I dont get is the way the city seemed to collapse just due to not having power and low gas supplies for four days. To hear all the whining and see the fighting at the pumps you would have thought it was armegedon. I could do four days without gas or electricity without batting an eyelash. So could most of the country, I suspect. Heck, I have an entire month supply of food and water for my family of 4 stored for just such things (and I live in CA, where there are no damn hurricanes, tornadoes, etc). Didnt these folks bother to prepare for potential disasters? And what is with the obsession with plugging in their cell phones? The city is all farked up and you are worried about your damn cell phone. Just use the home phone, they work even when the power is out in most cases. Or just do without. Humanity somehow managed to survive hundreds of thousands of years without cell phones and i pads yet these folks seem to think they will die without them.


    I'm going to answer you seriously even if you're trolling, which I'm not saying you are, just... here goes.

    Mind you I live in a rural area, grew up camping, and generally have at least two weeks worth of food on hand plus equipment/gear to get the hell out if needed just because of the way I was raised. However if you've ever seen how the average apartment is sized, you'd understand how especially anywhere with more than a couple of floors of tenants, no, they're not prepared. People who live in tiny apartments don't have the space to stock up for emergencies, and since NYC hardly ever has this kind of thing happen (at least since it became a major metropolis), there's not been much reason for that to change. People who live out in the more suburban areas are still mostly people who work in the city, so they've got a lot of the same mentality. NYC has always been touted (to me) as a place where you can get anything you want, 24/7. A huge chunk of the places that provided that however, I believe, were in the flooded/no power areas.

    Also NYC has a HUGE footprint, despite all those skyscrapers. Public transit was virtually shut down at first, and a lot of it still is due to fuel/power issues. You can walk, sure, but if you have to walk what you normally take the subway for and it's 5-6x as far as you are used to or more, well... I say this having visited Manhatten once for a few hours; that place scared the crap out of me since I am from a small city you can drive across in 5 min on the highway.

    As to cell phones, most people don't have landlines anymore. I know I don't, however I also don't have a lot of people I'd need to contact anyway so I don't usually worry about it. However, unless you turn your phone off, you will need to charge it within a couple of days at best, sooner if not. Mine (smartphone) lasts about a day because I am lazy and haven't figured out how to root it to stop the programs that drain the battery.

    If you really want a good idea of the sheer scope of the storm's aftermath, go watch the videos on weather.com and nbc - entire neighborhoods are just GONE closer to the shore. Again, this isn't a regular thing in the upper-mid-atlantic region, so people weren't nearly as prepared as they would be in Florida. I've never in my life owned a generator, have lived in Western NY pretty much my whole life.

    I had started a class like two days after Katrina hit and was upset with the government for not responding quickly enough, and we were talking about it in class, when my professor made a very good point. In the military (he knew I was in the Army before), when you take a group of ~250 people out to the field, it takes about 3 days to get everything ready to go, and this is in a basic training company with regular practice at the exercise. Imagine doing this for thousands or MILLIONS of people with just a few days warning on the storm's landfall. After he made that point, I've at least stopped being mad about the gulf coast response times, and I'm applying that logic to this one too.

    So just some food for thought, hopefully it helps people put things in perspective, and if you don't agree, that's ok. This is just how I see it. I am a little on the other side of the fence too; I don't think it's very intelligent to live on the ocean and expect that this could never happen. Hence why I live 400+ miles inland.
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