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  • Stop making sense, subby.
  • blogs.photopreneur.comView Full Size


    Can you win posthumously?
  • The answer is none. None more photoshopping.
  • There is clearly an acceptable level, as even your digital camera is "photoshoping" what it saves to produce a better photo (Unless your using a raw format). Most people would say that adjusting levels/colors across the whole image is also acceptable manipulation. Once you begin using tools to alter specific portions of the image, it becomes totally a matter of opinion on how much is acceptable. Without seeing a before and after picture, you can't really judge whether what was done is acceptable, and the article didn't have one.
  • You can't do an "Iran" level of photoshopping.
  • I think that adjusting levels might be okay, but any movement of elements of the image would be well into PS territory. I've been told that a big part of the genius of Ansel Adams was the result of tweaks in the development process.

    Although we do appreciate the works that show up here.
  • If what you did could be duplicated in a dark room then it should be allowed. Anything beyond that should not be allowed.
  • No photoshopping should be acceptable in a photography contest.
  • But it's okay if you use GIMP, right?
  • AverageAmericanGuy: No photoshopping should be acceptable in a photography contest.


    Photographers have been shopping their images since film was invented. A darkroom gives you a great deal of control over brightness and contrast, tone, etc. You can crop, and you can even control specific portions of the photograph without affecting other areas. It's seems silly that it's against the rule to do with a computer what film photographers do by waving little paddles around.
  • I used MS Paint.

    Should I not have done that?
  • And no letting colour blind people look at it! They can't appreciate art like we can!!
  • I find it hilarious and sad that the winning photos from the competition were all about broken husks of formerly thriving civilization. Somebody needs a hug.
  • Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: AverageAmericanGuy: No photoshopping should be acceptable in a photography contest.

    Photographers have been shopping their images since film was invented. A darkroom gives you a great deal of control over brightness and contrast, tone, etc. You can crop, and you can even control specific portions of the photograph without affecting other areas. It's seems silly that it's against the rule to do with a computer what film photographers do by waving little paddles around.


    Pretty much this. I used to add shadows to things in the dark room, and that was in highschool. I even used diffrent filters on the enlarger to adjust the image, dodged and burned specific areas, stitched negitives together, preformed double exposures to produce neat effects, tons of stuff. It was a bit harder then the computer is, But you could accomplish alot with a good enlarger and some time.
  • Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: AverageAmericanGuy: No photoshopping should be acceptable in a photography contest.

    Photographers have been shopping their images since film was invented. A darkroom gives you a great deal of control over brightness and contrast, tone, etc. You can crop, and you can even control specific portions of the photograph without affecting other areas. It's seems silly that it's against the rule to do with a computer what film photographers do by waving little paddles around.


    I'm against those things as well.
  • bobtheallmighty: I even used diffrent filters on the enlarger to adjust the image, dodged and burned specific areas, stitched negitives together, preformed double exposures to produce neat effects, tons of stuff. It was a bit harder then the computer is, But you could accomplish alot with a good enlarger and some time.


    ahhhhh. random ass double exposures. miss those. i also miss cross processing. ps cross processing isn't as random.
  • Here's an explanation from somebody with too much time on their hands: Link
  • AverageAmericanGuy: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: AverageAmericanGuy: No photoshopping should be acceptable in a photography contest.

    Photographers have been shopping their images since film was invented. A darkroom gives you a great deal of control over brightness and contrast, tone, etc. You can crop, and you can even control specific portions of the photograph without affecting other areas. It's seems silly that it's against the rule to do with a computer what film photographers do by waving little paddles around.

    I'm against those things as well.


    To be fair, I'm only against these things in the milieu of photography contests.

    Where one person spends a month of their lives staked out to capture the perfect shot with the sun in the right place in the sky and the weather just so, another will take a mediocre base image and dodge and burn until what he's looking for 'pops'. It's a disservice to those who work hard for their pure shots.
  • Krieghund: Stop making sense, subby.


    This is not my beautiful photograph.
  • Too bad. I love that photo and have been up to Lindisfarne to try and recreate my own version. I won a minor competition using a photo of the castle with a tremendously dramatic sky. I told no-one it was a sky replacement job and I feel slightly guilty, even though the rules say nothing to forbid this.
  • Krieghund: Stop making sense, subby.


    What you did... I see it.
  • wildcardjack: I think that adjusting levels might be okay, but any movement of elements of the image would be well into PS territory. I've been told that a big part of the genius of Ansel Adams was the result of tweaks in the development process.


    Exactly. If it's a direct analog of a darkroom process, it's OK to do it in Photoshop. (IMHO)
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