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  • All manufacturing, even the stuff we outsourced, will be done by robots in a few years and small items will be printed at home using 3-D printers.
  • For the past 30-plus years, through Republican and Democratic administrations, there has been much lip service paid to the idea that the era of big government is over. Long live free enterprise. And yet in the case of those areas surrounding the capital, wealth has gravitated to the exact spot where government regulation is created.

    That's a nice Apples to Potato comparison.
  • Yes, because the future is near the railroad tracks. F*cking idiotic.
  • I do, and often, and it's graffitti'd up and busted industrial crap, much of which is abandoned. Or you can see the lovely slums of NJ and Philly, none of which have changed since the 70's.

    If this shows me the state of the US economy, then we have been in a depression for my entire life.
  • PC LOAD LETTER: I do, and often, and it's graffitti'd up and busted industrial crap, much of which is abandoned. Or you can see the lovely slums of NJ and Philly, none of which have changed since the 70's.

    If this shows me the state of the US economy, then we have been in a depression for my entire life.


    This
  • NewportBarGuy: Yes, because the future is near the railroad tracks. F*cking idiotic.


    Yeah, because clearly, manufacturing wouldn't require any direct access to rail transport. You can just deliver scrap iron and finished industrial products by dogsled and bicycle courier.
  • PC LOAD LETTER: I do, and often, and it's graffitti'd up and busted industrial crap, much of which is abandoned. Or you can see the lovely slums of NJ and Philly, none of which have changed since the 70's.

    If this shows me the state of the US economy, then we have been in a depression for my entire life.


    It's more an example of how infrastructure is preferably built on cheap land.

    And that the land is cheap for a reason.
  • It's amazing how many people still believe that you can have a functional economy without basic industry. Service industries are important, but they don't create wealth.

    It's arrogant to think we can just perpetually let the third world handle all the dirty work while we sit back and skim off the cream and expect the world to sit in awe of our imagined monopoly on handling all the less physical creative stuff.
  • I've done the Northeast Corridor route more than a few times.

    It's like looking down the ass crack of America.
  • moulderx1: What's a train?


    It's what they use to haul Chinese goods from the port to your Wal-Mart distribution hub.
  • a similar view is available on the commuter train tween waukegon and chigago
  • JesseL: It's amazing how many people still believe that you can have a functional economy without basic industry. Service industries are important, but they don't create wealth.

    It's arrogant to think we can just perpetually let the third world handle all the dirty work while we sit back and skim off the cream and expect the world to sit in awe of our imagined monopoly on handling all the less physical creative stuff.


    Manufacturing in the US still exists, it's just increasingly automated. The only reason why any manufacturing is outsourced to Asia or other cheap areas is because of just that -- it's cheaper. The impending technological innovations in robotics and 3D printing are going to wreak absolute havoc on the economies of those countries which rely on outsourced labor from the developed countries.

    Although we will see more manufacturing done within our own borders, don't expect there to be many humans involved in the process.
  • The U.S. economy is more than 230 miles of train easement.
  • My prepackaged outrage is late on arrival.
  • News Flash: It's like this near every train track. For some reason, land values around train tracks plummet...
  • I did that riding on the Greyhound... man, New Jersey is ugly as shiat.
  • Rindred: NewportBarGuy: Yes, because the future is near the railroad tracks. F*cking idiotic.

    Yeah, because clearly, manufacturing wouldn't require any direct access to rail transport. You can just deliver scrap iron and finished industrial products by dogsled and bicycle courier.


    How about the move to trucks? Railroad sidings can not accommodate big rigs, so it's off to a larger site by the freeway. That's what happened to Berkeley's 4th Street,only that town was able to rehab it into a shopping area.
  • They should really mention D.C. first thing in the article. Instead "Amtrak between New York and Washington " mentally conjured a much longer trip.
  • Er, I've lived in the northeast for about seven years now, and with a few exceptions, it looks like that everywhere east of Chicago until you hit New York. They call it the Rust Belt for a reason. It's certainly not a microcosm of America, though.
  • NewportBarGuy: Yes, because the future is near the railroad tracks. F*cking idiotic.


    People love mass transit. Cities are growing faster than suburbs.

    /thank you, smart growth
  • I took an Amtrak train to Ventura, CA last year from Tacoma, WA. It was interesting to watch the places it went.

    I had some very cool discussions with folks in the dining car about how you could use the view out the window to give a distinct picture of the changes the American economy has gone through in the 20th and 21st centuries. You can see mile after mile of dliapidated warehouses, sidings no longer used and massive industrial and storage buildings going to rot, or places that are being repurposed and gentrified- hipster lofts in the old mill, that sort of thing.

    But it's not about how the economy is tanking. There's a bunch of factors at play.

    First, America's economy has transitioned from a nearly total industrial/agricultural base to far less industry and more service-based. As that transition occurred, the rail system became less critical to moving stuff around.

    Second, most major industrial centers served by rail predate the implementation of the Interstate Highway System, which made it possible to move large amounts of goods without having to be constrained to where the trains went.

    Third, the industries we do have no longer use the same type of logistics that were in play when many of these rail lines went in. You don't need to cart in and warehouse six month's worth of steel billets to make you widgets; we use totally different means of production.

    Since industrial businesses didn't have to be right next to a rail yard to work any longer, and there were fewer of them overall, the fact that being next to a rail yard isn't exactly the most pleasant spot in the world to own property meant that the spaces around the rail lines began to decay.

    Trying to picture the US economy by the view from a train window would be like trying to appreciate classical music by listening to just the first violin part of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.
  • JesseL: It's amazing how many people still believe that you can have a functional economy without basic industry. Service industries are important, but they don't create wealth.

    It's arrogant to think we can just perpetually let the third world handle all the dirty work while we sit back and skim off the cream and expect the world to sit in awe of our imagined monopoly on handling all the less physical creative stuff.


    US is still the world's leading manufacturer and on an absolute basis ($1.8 Trillion in 2010) continues to grow. And yes, that's manufacturing here. So there is no problem creating wealth. Despite online economic experts like you find on Fark the US still maintains a huge manufacturing base.

    Did you mean jobs instead of wealth?
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