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  • I thought shiat like "medical school" and "surgical residency" were supposed to make you a better physician. By the time you're hacking into a patient's brian you're supposed to already be a pretty damn good surgeon, not some iidiot farktard.
  • if at first you don't succeed - try, try again.
  • WTF? If one of my employees farked around like that on the job, they'd be in Progressive Discipline faster than you could say "Jack Robinson". Not just the mistakes, which are bad enough, but the actual not doing her job at all - not reading the report from radiology and therefore not diagnosing the patient at all, leaving the OR during surgery...

    Colorado should never have allowed her to settle with no discipline. These were not just odd mishaps, they demonstrate that she just doesn't do her job when she doesn't feel like it. She should be removed from any chance of her farking around causing anyone else harm.
  • Ambivalence: I thought shiat like "medical school" and "surgical residency" were supposed to make you a better physician. By the time you're hacking into a patient's brian you're supposed to already be a pretty damn good surgeon, not some iidiot farktard.


    Mistakes happen because people are people. The fact that people think Doctors are immune to making them demonstrates the kind of flawed thinking that we attribute to educated people. And the fact of the matter is that they frequently have more to do with the practices of a system than the decisions of an individual person.
  • Benevolent Misanthrope: WTF? If one of my employees farked around like that on the job, they'd be in Progressive Discipline faster than you could say "Jack Robinson". Not just the mistakes, which are bad enough, but the actual not doing her job at all - not reading the report from radiology and therefore not diagnosing the patient at all, leaving the OR during surgery...

    Colorado should never have allowed her to settle with no discipline. These were not just odd mishaps, they demonstrate that she just doesn't do her job when she doesn't feel like it. She should be removed from any chance of her farking around causing anyone else harm.


    This, too.
  • Know what they call the guy who graduates dead last in his med school class?

    /doctor
  • BronyMedic: Ambivalence: I thought shiat like "medical school" and "surgical residency" were supposed to make you a better physician. By the time you're hacking into a patient's brian you're supposed to already be a pretty damn good surgeon, not some iidiot farktard.

    Mistakes happen because people are people. The fact that people think Doctors are immune to making them demonstrates the kind of flawed thinking that we attribute to educated people. And the fact of the matter is that they frequently have more to do with the practices of a system than the decisions of an individual person.


    sure mistakes happen, but proper training in "best practices" is supposed to reduce their frequency by a great deal. A doctor having a "series" of mistakes is not just an example of normal human imperfection, it demonstrates a fundamental lack of skill or adherence to proper proceedure.
  • Nothing to see here people, they have no f*cking clue about what is ailing you but will give you whatever systemic altering drugs to keep you coming back.
  • AbbeySomeone: Nothing to see here people, they have no f*cking clue about what is ailing you but will give you whatever systemic altering drugs to keep you coming back.


    How do you go from saying things that are so intelligent and thought-out, to saying complete derp like this?
  • AbbeySomeone: Nothing to see here people, they have no f*cking clue about what is ailing you but will give you whatever systemic altering drugs to keep you coming back.


    While medicine is a science, it is not a precise science like math. What works for one person will do nothing for another person or make another person sicker. While doctors are SUPPOSED to have more information and a better clue than you, that does not mean you can completely rely on them for the correct answer. If you don't think something is correct for you, push back and say no or ask for further information. Or get another opinion.

    The idiot in the article needs to her have license revoked and banned from medicine completely. One mistake is ok. Four in that short of a period of time? Fark no. That shows that you have a distinct disability in what you do. Personally, I think she should be held financially accountable - those that she farked up, she needs to pay for their care for the rest of their lives. Operating on the wrong side of the body is so incredibly BASIC.

    \there's a reason why they call it medical practice
  • Anyone wanna bet what the leading cause of needless death is in this country?

    Obesity? Nah.
    Cardiac issues? Nope.
    Alcoholism/Drug Abuse? No siree.
    Cancer? Not even close.
    DUI/Car Accidents? PUH-leese.

    Over 900,000 Americans die every year due to physician error.
  • dramboxf: Anyone wanna bet what the leading cause of needless death is in this country?

    Obesity? Nah.
    Cardiac issues? Nope.
    Alcoholism/Drug Abuse? No siree.
    Cancer? Not even close.
    DUI/Car Accidents? PUH-leese.

    Over 900,000 Americans die every year due to physician error.


    [Citation Needed]

    The actual number is between 48,000 to 98,000 people die each year due to medical error or malpractice. This includes missed or wrong diagnosises, and medication errors.
  • BronyMedic: Mistakes happen because people are people. The fact that people think Doctors are immune to making them demonstrates the kind of flawed thinking that we attribute to educated people. And the fact of the matter is that they frequently have more to do with the practices of a system than the decisions of an individual person.


    but these are not mistakes. Once is a mistake, a couple times a year, sure fine.
    But this? This is a clear pattern of dangerous incompetence, negligence.
    And the Medical Boards are culpable.
    WHY did they not want to discipline her?
    WHAT is the point of a Medical Board if they dont actually protect society from people like this?
    Rubber stamping Board Examines I guess. Woot!! We are so lucky that they are there protecting doctors like this.

    /shudder
  • BronyMedic: The actual number is between 48,000 to 98,000 people die each year due to medical error or malpractice. This includes missed or wrong diagnosises, and medication errors.


    Which leads to a number of different causes with a number of different solutions to improve the numbers.
    Misdiagnosis? Better double checking and better diagnostic processes, aimed at finding misdiagnosis rather than cutting expenses.
    Medication errors? Shudder. So many causes. Why are our pharmacists counting 30 pills from a big container into a little container? Prefilled 30bottles could probably go a long way to cutting some of those errors down. Dont get me started on dr's handwriting

    but in the end, eternal vigilance on the part of the patient is probably the only solution.

    /The checks which were done in pre-op for my last knee surgery amused me. Multiple people asking which knee, and signing the leg. Dr, nurse, anesthesiologist, oh yes, and ME.
    /csb
  • BronyMedic: [Citation Needed]

    The actual number is between 48,000 to 98,000 people die each year due to medical error or malpractice. This includes missed or wrong diagnosises, and medication errors.


    Here's the problem with that number. And, as a medic, you should be aware of this.

    The entire system of how a hospital death is reported is broken; Physicians insist that they, and only they, because of their massive education, are qualified enough to decide why[1] a specific patient died.

    M&M, have you ever heard of it?

    There exists in this country a parade of lies, if you will. A resident makes a mistake and a patient dies and after review the doctors decide that the ACTUAL cause of death was something else, something systemic or incurable. SO MANY physician mistakes are covered up because it's all "part of the process of making good physicians."

    I recognize the fact that doctors-in-training are going to make mistakes. I recognize that this is part of the process of creating doctors. But they need to be more honest about it, more open that when we train physicians (and yes, even paramedics) they are going to make mistakes and patients will die.

    I have a problem with the insular community that holds out a hand and says "ONLY WE are qualified to judge what is an honest, innocent mistake and what is farked up."

    [1] There's a difference between the medical cause of death and what has led to it. Just as in law, if a victim is shot to death, the medical cause of death is "cardiac arrest due to hypovolumia" and the legal cause of death is "homicide by gunshot."

    I also saw your [citation needed] and will have to get back to you; I got that # from a ER physician friend of mind and he's half a world away (AUS) and not responding to an 'emergency' email.
  • And they will make me the best inmate ever!
  • A doctor operating on the wrong side of a person's brain is not only a failure on the doctor, but a failure on the entire surgical staff also.
  • A friend of mine is a doctor, not just a doc but a surgeon. She is pretty careful when doing her job, and yes, they will ask a patient more than once which body part has the boo-boo and needs fixing.

    But she has pointed out often that even though a person can finish medical school, that does not mean they are smart.
  • 1. Mistakes happen, for sure, and doctors are no more immune to them than anybody else.
    2. That said, this KIND of mistake shouldn't be happening at this LEVEL of medicine. Operating on the wrong side of someone's brain isn't in the same league as misdiagnosing the flu for pneumonia; or even amputating the left leg when it was supposed to be the right leg.
    3. Misdiagnoses happen because doctors are under a lot of pressure; and because some diseases present as other diseases. And also because, let's face it, sometimes mistakes will happen and not be discovered in time to save the patient, which was how John Ritter died--nobody recognized a dissecting aortic aneurism as not being a simple heart attack in time to save his life.
    4.However, there are also crappy doctors, like there are crappy teachers, crappy accountants and crappy mechanics. There are people who don't belong in their chosen field and most of the time they get discovered in time to prevent greater harm, in medicine or in auto mechanics. Sometimes they don't.

    But to think there's some kind of locked-hands double dealing on the part of doctors to keep evil and/or incompetent physicians practicing even when they know people are dying is ridiculous. Doctors suffer because of these quacks and bush-league Mengeles, as much as attorneys suffer from wannabe Dream Team members; just because one or two bad doctors slip through the cracks doesn't mean all doctors are conspiring to keep scalpels in their wicked brethrens' hands as long as possible. Medicine is an art, and all survivors are JUST SURE that their family member would have survived if only Evil Doctor hadn't been there. That doesn't make it true. Second-guessing does nobody any good at all.
  • Pathologist: Have you seen this before?

    Doug: Seen it? Upstairs they call that a "Doug"!
  • BronyMedic: Ambivalence: I thought shiat like "medical school" and "surgical residency" were supposed to make you a better physician. By the time you're hacking into a patient's brian you're supposed to already be a pretty damn good surgeon, not some iidiot farktard.

    Mistakes happen because people are people. The fact that people think Doctors are immune to making them demonstrates the kind of flawed thinking that we attribute to educated people. And the fact of the matter is that they frequently have more to do with the practices of a system than the decisions of an individual person.


    Sure, doctors make mistakes. Few of them make so many mistakes they have to repeatedly surrender their medical licence and move from state to state just so they can keep practicing medicine.
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