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  • Shiat happens. Lawsuits will come, insurance will pay the drivers, everyone winds up farked somehow.
  • Reminds me of the days when you needed to mix oil with the gasoline for a putt-putt 2-stroke engine.
    The ideal mix was 8 oz oil to a gallon of gas (or something like that).
  • Pity there aren't engines made to run on any petrol. Oh wait, Military engines. We should all have Omnifuel engines.

    WeCantHaveNiceThings.
  • It's the fuel transport company's fault for not clearing the tank. Also, they switched from diesel to gas; which is a no-no.
  • I knew an old timer who would put a shot of diesel in the tank of every brand new (gasoline)truck he bought to, as he would say, "prime it". Truck would smoke like he was selling bar-b-q for miles.

    Also, most lawn equipment, dirt-bikes and PWC run on two stroke engines which require the gas/oil mixture.
  • I wouldn't expect this to be too big a deal for most cars. A bit more smoke/smell from the exhaust, sure. On the other hand, with all these new-fangled emissions controls and sensors, who knows what might happen to the cars down the road?
  • eKonk: I wouldn't expect this to be too big a deal for most cars. A bit more smoke/smell from the exhaust, sure. On the other hand, with all these new-fangled emissions controls and sensors, who knows what might happen to the cars down the road?


    It's big enough deal that most cars will knock and stall. Depending on how much was mixed and it doesn't take much to alter gasoline.

    Diesel is part of the kerosene world, like jet fuel (not AVgas), so it's flashpoint is much higher than gasoline.
  • eKonk: I wouldn't expect this to be too big a deal for most cars. A bit more smoke/smell from the exhaust, sure. On the other hand, with all these new-fangled emissions controls and sensors, who knows what might happen to the cars down the road?


    eh.. the new ones may actually shut down or go into "low power mode" which is of course ridiculous, because as you say more smoke and smell is about all the real "damage" is.
  • JacksonBryan: eKonk: I wouldn't expect this to be too big a deal for most cars. A bit more smoke/smell from the exhaust, sure. On the other hand, with all these new-fangled emissions controls and sensors, who knows what might happen to the cars down the road?

    It's big enough deal that most cars will knock and stall. Depending on how much was mixed and it doesn't take much to alter gasoline.

    Diesel is part of the kerosene world, like jet fuel (not AVgas), so it's flashpoint is much higher than gasoline.


    yeah.. but how much could it be? a few hundred gallon to a few 1000? it should be fine.
  • JacksonBryan: eKonk: I wouldn't expect this to be too big a deal for most cars. A bit more smoke/smell from the exhaust, sure. On the other hand, with all these new-fangled emissions controls and sensors, who knows what might happen to the cars down the road?

    It's big enough deal that most cars will knock and stall. Depending on how much was mixed and it doesn't take much to alter gasoline.

    Diesel is part of the kerosene world, like jet fuel (not AVgas), so it's flashpoint is much higher than gasoline.


    Interesting, I suppose. The only time I've ever put diesel in a gasoline engine was in a 1950 chevy straight 6, and I had only used the diesel to free up some seized pistons. A lot of smoke, it smelled, but overall it wasn't much different from any other chevy from that era.

    /The more you know, and all that
  • kvinesknows:

    yeah.. but how much could it be? a few hundred gallon to a few 1000? it should be fine.


    Depends really, the article said the tanker still had diesel when it was filled with gasoline...that could mean half/half or 1/4 to half, or since the tanker company probably doesn't know, any of the above.

    I think the ECU's in newer cars probably caused a lot of the issues, but the fuel filter may get gummed up, injectors too depending on the mix. An older vehicle may have barely sputtered.
  • What does the difference between the fuels do to a gasoline car? Forgive my ignorance...

    /not a car girl
  • one is more processed
    one is less processed and more like oil

    oil does not burn as well as gas.

    think a wood fire... does WET wood burn okay?
  • This would be more of an issue if gas was introduced into a diesel system.
  • If I still was driving my old '51 Ford flathead V8, it probably matter. My first car,
  • Yet another of the knock-on effects of Hurricane Sandy.
  • Myria: What does the difference between the fuels do to a gasoline car? Forgive my ignorance...

    /not a car girl


    Diesel doesn't burn in a gas engine, so it just vaporizes and goes out the tailpipe, if there's enough gas mixture to keep the car going at all. I think something like 20% would overwhelm a carburated engine until it was cleaned out, with fuel injectors I have no idea.
  • kvinesknows: one is more processed
    one is less processed and more like oil



    I remember back in the day of the first "oil crisis" (yes, I'm old) diesel was WAY cheaper than gasoline.

    These days its WAAAAY more expensive - likely because it is, as you say, less processed, and much cheaper to produce than gasoline.


    /God I love big oil
  • Abe Vigoda's Ghost: This would be more of an issue if gas was introduced into a diesel system.


    Don't all modern diesel engines come with knock sensors to prevent outright damage? Otherwise, yeah, good luck salvaging that engine, my mom's BF has lots of stories of new hires doing that.
  • Abe Vigoda's Ghost: This would be more of an issue if gas was introduced into a diesel system.


    THIS.
  • Amos Quito: kvinesknows: one is more processed
    one is less processed and more like oil


    I remember back in the day of the first "oil crisis" (yes, I'm old) diesel was WAY cheaper than gasoline.

    These days its WAAAAY more expensive - likely because it is, as you say, less processed, and much cheaper to produce than gasoline.


    /God I love big oil


    yeah.. I still have not bothered enough to look into that.. what the hell is up with that? how did diesel at times come to be just as or more expensive then gas?
  • Day_Old_Dutchie: Reminds me of the days when you needed to mix oil with the gasoline for a putt-putt 2-stroke engine.
    The ideal mix was 8 oz oil to a gallon of gas (or something like that).


    You still have to do that for two stroke engines like chainsaws. The ratio varies with the engine, but chainsaws are 50:1.
  • cig-mkr: If I still was driving my old '51 Ford flathead V8, it probably wouldn't matter. My first car,


    just fixing it
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