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  • Sigh.

    Ok...one more time:

    Voting is a right, not a privilege. That means you don't have to pay to do it, and while the state can regulate it, the conditions that it places on the voter should be minimal.

    So, for example, you have to show ID or otherwise establish your identity (utility bill, what have you) and residency when you register to vote. However, you can't be required to pay a tax. Being required to present an ID that costs money amounts to a poll tax. A state-issued ID like a driver's license certainly expedites the process, but it can't. be. required. If you have a birth certificate or a social security card, that is enough. If it's good enough to get a driver's license, it's good enough to establish your identity for voting purposes.

    After you have registered, the ID is redundant; you are registered, and that registration is sufficient. It's similar to how you need a birth certificate and a social security card to get a driver's license, but that after you don't need to carry them because the license is enough to establish that you met those requirements.

    Now, with that being said, if the states wanted to embrace the expense of issuing hard-plastic photo-bearing voter registration cards, they would be entirely free to do so. In fact, if they were truly only concerned about preventing voter fraud, they would happily embrace that cost as being part of the price of liberty. However,they don't. Instead, they (sensibly) opt for the cheapest method possible: a little piece of paper.

    And that's exactly as it should be: as often as people move, etc, states that issued such cards would spend a fortune on the damn things. It's ok to do that with driver's licenses, because those are privileges, and so that cost can be passed along to the driver. That the state doesn't choose to spend that kind of money to provide ironclad voter registration cards isn't the voter's problem, however; they have met their part of the voting arrangement by registering, and the courts have repeatedly ruled that further ID requirements represent an undue burden.

    / it's almost as those this whole ID bs isn't really about preventing voter fraud at all
    // after all...what price can the state place on liberty?
  • Yeah, I was asked.
    I wish I'd gone with my first instinct, which was to say "You don't need to see my identification" while waving my hand.
    Unfortunately, I forgot to do that. I did say no on the ID though, since this law is utterly asinine.
  • Turmoil in PA over voter ID law.

    It doesn't matter what the people want. Romney is going to win PA, OH, and FL.
  • I was asked for ID. I showed it. I know I didn't have to, but I just wanted to get it done.

    /Gobama
  • Poll workers had 'ID REQUIRED' on their paperwork at my polling location.
  • whistleridge: Sigh.

    Ok...one more time:

    Voting is a right, not a privilege. That means you don't have to pay to do it, and while the state can regulate it, the conditions that it places on the voter should be minimal.

    So, for example, you have to show ID or otherwise establish your identity (utility bill, what have you) and residency when you register to vote. However, you can't be required to pay a tax. Being required to present an ID that costs money amounts to a poll tax. A state-issued ID like a driver's license certainly expedites the process, but it can't. be. required. If you have a birth certificate or a social security card, that is enough. If it's good enough to get a driver's license, it's good enough to establish your identity for voting purposes.

    After you have registered, the ID is redundant; you are registered, and that registration is sufficient. It's similar to how you need a birth certificate and a social security card to get a driver's license, but that after you don't need to carry them because the license is enough to establish that you met those requirements.

    Now, with that being said, if the states wanted to embrace the expense of issuing hard-plastic photo-bearing voter registration cards, they would be entirely free to do so. In fact, if they were truly only concerned about preventing voter fraud, they would happily embrace that cost as being part of the price of liberty. However,they don't. Instead, they (sensibly) opt for the cheapest method possible: a little piece of paper.

    And that's exactly as it should be: as often as people move, etc, states that issued such cards would spend a fortune on the damn things. It's ok to do that with driver's licenses, because those are privileges, and so that cost can be passed along to the driver. That the state doesn't choose to spend that kind of money to provide ironclad voter registration cards isn't the voter's problem, however; they have met their part of the voting arrangement by registering, and the courts have repeatedly ruled that further ID requirements represent an undue burden.

    / it's almost as those this whole ID bs isn't really about preventing voter fraud at all
    // after all...what price can the state place on liberty?


    Pretty much what I've been saying...
  • My polling location was handing out little pamphlets about what kind of ID would be required for the next election and then proceeded to ask for ID.
  • Anything to keep those people from voting.
  • They didn't take my ID but then I'm in Florida so I didn't expect a fair election.
  • Meh, most people are honest.

  • Makes total sense


    Yes, it does. "Do you have..." is not the same as "You must have...". Like submitter, the concept is quite simple.
  • Well, that will catch the nervous types of fraudulent voters
  • Philadelphia here: no one even asked for my ID, even though I planned to refuse showing it.
  • bluorangefyre: Poll workers had 'ID REQUIRED' on their paperwork at my polling location.


    I love Oregon. I get my ballot, fill it out, and drop it off at the library. So easy.

    The rest of the country should try it. The only downside is that more people vote.
  • whistleridge: After you have registered, the ID is redundant; you are registered, and that registration is sufficient.


    Do you get some sort of form when you register? One form per voter?
    I assume so or anyone could walk into the polling station and claim to be you.
  • I just walked up to the correct line, gave my ID, let the little old poll lady find me in the book, signed and got my ballot. I don't have a problem showing my ID, but I do understand people who do. If the state wants an ID to vote, they should be paying for it, that makes since.
  • Pennsylvanians are known liars. I should know, I'm from Pennsylvania.
  • I didn't want to show ID at the polls because I think this whole thing is a stupid waste of time and money to placate mouth-breathing retards who can't fathom why more people don't believe the same retarded bullsh*t they do. So, it MUST be voter fraud.

    No, f*ck that. Put it back the way it was.

    I showed the ID because it's the law in my state. Don't fall for this trap in yours.
  • Dumb ol people are dumb
  • "We don't need no steenkin ID!"

    www.rudebadmood.comView Full Size
  • I refused to show mine when they asked, and they were ticked off by it and tried to say "well, you'll have to show it next time!" I was like "okay, well, I'll show it then". I made them mad.
  • Here in MI, we have something similar.

    You need a photo id, but if you don't have one, you just sign an affidavit saying you are who you say you are (thus making the laws constitutional).

    /Had a couple people without photo id's matching their address. Unless it was obvious they didn't live in the city (had one girl with screwed up registration who lived an hour away, and was still registered at her old address in my precinct who ended up voting with us), we treated it as lacking an id, and just had them sign the affadavit.
  • This has been the policy for the last couple elections in PA.
  • MINNESOTA: Gay marriage amendment: 56% no 10% reporting
    Voter ID: 53% no 10% reporting
    Bachmann: 51/49 25% reporting
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