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  • Ah, placebo effect, what can't it do?
  • A true athlete understands dodging squirrel corpses is part of the challenge
  • How is a product based on isopropyl alcohol not miscible with water?
  • Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

    So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?
  • Have they looked into any diet drugs, "cleansing" regimens or other faddish things that teenage girls are wont to do? Or would that be useless, considering that NONE of THEIR girls would do something like that, and every problem is someone else's fault...
  • Years ago my neighbor put up a 50 foot tower for his ham radio, but broke his hand and was unable to complete the project for several months. During that time, other neighbors filed complaints with the FCC alledging interference with their TVs (no cable back then, it was all OTA). Of course, there was no intereferencem but the neighbors finally got the FCC to send an engineer out who determined that the interference was coming from a 500-watt linear amplifier that the loudest complainier was using with his CB who promptly had all his CB equipment siezed. The compaining guy turned into a total get-off-my-lawn asshat after that and the entire neighborhood was relieved when he moved to a gated community a few years after that. He must have been hell on the HOA.
  • kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

    So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?


    Not subby but I agree w/his snowflake assessment. Let's see--different teams using the pool with no ill effects. There's an article on AnnArbor.com about the new pool cover and the parents of the girl's swim team "suddenly" report all these symptoms. And, after they're told the chemical hasn't been present for weeks, they don't want to talk to the media.

    Rashes? unusual itchiness, excessive hair loss---ask the girls on the team if they've discovered some new lotion or hair conditioner. I'll bet you'll find your answer there.
  • ZAZ: How is a product based on isopropyl alcohol not miscible with water?


    It also contains 5% of some kind of organic surfactant that probably keeps the IPA from going into solution. The IPA is attracted to the non-polar, hydrophobic end of the surfactant while the polar end points towards the H20. The whole shebang probably forms micelles that float on the top of the pool.
  • wambu: Years ago my neighbor put up a 50 foot tower for his ham radio, but broke his hand and was unable to complete the project for several months. During that time, other neighbors filed complaints with the FCC alledging interference with their TVs (no cable back then, it was all OTA). Of course, there was no intereferencem but the neighbors finally got the FCC to send an engineer out who determined that the interference was coming from a 500-watt linear amplifier that the loudest complainier was using with his CB who promptly had all his CB equipment siezed. The compaining guy turned into a total get-off-my-lawn asshat after that and the entire neighborhood was relieved when he moved to a gated community a few years after that. He must have been hell on the HOA.


    As a Ham Radio operator, HA HA!
  • kronicfeld: rub some dirt on it?


    Of course not. One should blame the most recent thing one has vaguely heard about, and possibly file a lawsuit. And while you are at it, exaggerate the supposed symptoms publicly.
  • brigid_fitch: kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

    So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?

    Not subby but I agree w/his snowflake assessment. Let's see--different teams using the pool with no ill effects. There's an article on AnnArbor.com about the new pool cover and the parents of the girl's swim team "suddenly" report all these symptoms. And, after they're told the chemical hasn't been present for weeks, they don't want to talk to the media.

    Rashes? unusual itchiness, excessive hair loss---ask the girls on the team if they've discovered some new lotion or hair conditioner. I'll bet you'll find your answer there.


    I'm going to say you both have a point. It's not unreasonable for parents to question if the new liquid cover could be a factor in the symptoms. And they absolutely should consider other possible causes.

    /kumbaya
  • There goes your lawsuit, parents. I'd say sorry, but I'm not.
  • kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

    So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?


    The parents were just trying to explain away the fact that their kids are teenagers and have, y'know, farked up bodies as per normal.

    Either that or their kids are doing meth.
  • wambu: Years ago my neighbor put up a 50 foot tower for his ham radio, but broke his hand and was unable to complete the project for several months. During that time, other neighbors filed complaints with the FCC alledging interference with their TVs (no cable back then, it was all OTA). Of course, there was no intereferencem but the neighbors finally got the FCC to send an engineer out who determined that the interference was coming from a 500-watt linear amplifier that the loudest complainier was using with his CB who promptly had all his CB equipment siezed. The compaining guy turned into a total get-off-my-lawn asshat after that and the entire neighborhood was relieved when he moved to a gated community a few years after that. He must have been hell on the HOA.


    Not to threadjack, but that reminds me of a story I heard on local radio a couple of years ago. Woman called in to complain about her town's zoning board. Her neighbor was building a catapult in his backyard. After it was about 1/2-built, it was pretty farking big and she asked him what it was for. He explained he was building it to take to Punkin' Chunkin' (she had no clue what it was) and freaked out. She was worried about a child getting hurt on it (Think of the children!) so called the zoning board. Zoning officer came out, spoke to the guy, and decided that it wasn't a violation (not a permanent structure). Then, since the officer was already in the neighborhood, decided to check out all the houses.

    Woman got slammed with a couple thousand in fines for not having a permit for her garage, a back deck. and a few other additions she'd never applied for permits on.

    Moral: Don't be so quick to start complaining about what your neighbors are doing just because you don't understand it.
  • propasaurus: brigid_fitch: kronicfeld: Several parents with daughters on the girls swimming and diving team contacted the district last month to say their student athletes were experiencing abnormal effects from exposure to pool water this season. The parents cited excessive hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

    So, submitter, by using the term "snowflake," you're suggesting that a parent observing such symptoms in their child would be unreasonably clingy and overprotective to have the audacity to approach the school about rooting out a potential cause? That's what I'm to take away from this? What were they supposed to do, rub some dirt on it?

    Not subby but I agree w/his snowflake assessment. Let's see--different teams using the pool with no ill effects. There's an article on AnnArbor.com about the new pool cover and the parents of the girl's swim team "suddenly" report all these symptoms. And, after they're told the chemical hasn't been present for weeks, they don't want to talk to the media.

    Rashes? unusual itchiness, excessive hair loss---ask the girls on the team if they've discovered some new lotion or hair conditioner. I'll bet you'll find your answer there.

    I'm going to say you both have a point. It's not unreasonable for parents to question if the new liquid cover could be a factor in the symptoms. And they absolutely should consider other possible causes.

    /kumbaya


    Nope, the parents will blame it on the placebo, and start a movement to have placebos removed from the medical field.

    /never underestimate the stupidity of helpcopter parents
  • This About That: Of course not. One should blame the most recent thing one has vaguely heard about, and possibly file a lawsuit. And while you are at it, exaggerate the supposed symptoms publicly.


    Nothing about a lawsuit in the story. Nothing to suggest any symptoms were publicly exaggerated. The students apparently have a common connection in that they were on the swim team and experiencing the same symptoms. The parents talked to the school about it in an apparent effort to find out what the cause was. What part of this supposed to be stroking my outrage gland?

    Lots of projection in this thread.
  • nmrsnr: Ah, placebo effect, what can't it do?


    sure, but I can see IPA drying the skin out MORE on top of the chlorine and just being in the water
  • hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

    So, tight swimcaps and over-chlorinated water?
  • wambu: Years ago my neighbor put up a 50 foot tower for his ham radio, but broke his hand and was unable to complete the project for several months. During that time, other neighbors filed complaints with the FCC alledging interference with their TVs (no cable back then, it was all OTA). Of course, there was no intereferencem but the neighbors finally got the FCC to send an engineer out who determined that the interference was coming from a 500-watt linear amplifier that the loudest complainier was using with his CB who promptly had all his CB equipment siezed. The compaining guy turned into a total get-off-my-lawn asshat after that and the entire neighborhood was relieved when he moved to a gated community a few years after that. He must have been hell on the HOA.


    /CSB!
  • kingoomieiii: hair loss, nausea, burning sensations, rashes, unusual itchiness, dry skin and eye irritation.

    So, tight swimcaps and over-chlorinated water?


    and no goggles
  • NowhereMon: ZAZ: How is a product based on isopropyl alcohol not miscible with water?

    It also contains 5% of some kind of organic surfactant that probably keeps the IPA from going into solution. The IPA is attracted to the non-polar, hydrophobic end of the surfactant while the polar end points towards the H20. The whole shebang probably forms micelles that float on the top of the pool.


    GEEK
    and thanks :D
  • NowhereMon: ZAZ: How is a product based on isopropyl alcohol not miscible with water?

    It also contains 5% of some kind of organic surfactant that probably keeps the IPA from going into solution. The IPA is attracted to the non-polar, hydrophobic end of the surfactant while the polar end points towards the H20. The whole shebang probably forms micelles that float on the top of the pool.


    Is that the same stuff they use in the "waterless" urinals?
  • wambu: Years ago my neighbor put up a 50 foot tower for his ham radio, but broke his hand and was unable to complete the project for several months. During that time, other neighbors filed complaints with the FCC alledging interference with their TVs (no cable back then, it was all OTA). Of course, there was no intereferencem but the neighbors finally got the FCC to send an engineer out who determined that the interference was coming from a 500-watt linear amplifier that the loudest complainier was using with his CB who promptly had all his CB equipment siezed. The compaining guy turned into a total get-off-my-lawn asshat after that and the entire neighborhood was relieved when he moved to a gated community a few years after that. He must have been hell on the HOA.


    i2.kym-cdn.comView Full Size
  • But its in the water memory.
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