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  • I'd love to try a deep fried turkey some day. I hear they're de-e-licious. I'd only ever try frying one myself though if I had a large yard to lower the risk of burning anything down.
  • Darwin at his best...
  • Frying a turkey is easy. You have to be a complete moron to start a fire doing it.

    I'm frying one and my brother is smoking one next week for Thanksgiving. Can't wait.
  • Spatchcocking is the way to go. 

    Link

  • "More and more people have tried it," he continued, "instead of just sticking it in the oven, maybe found it was more exciting to cook it outside."


    I guess that's one way to describe it.
  • Cythraul: I'd love to try a deep fried turkey some day. I hear they're de-e-licious. I'd only ever try frying one myself though if I had a large yard to lower the risk of burning anything down.


    They are delicious.

    You don't need a large yard, but you do need enough room that if the fryer starts to flame up, there is nothing around it to catch on fire. That means no garages, no decks, etc.
  • Pfft, I hickory smoke mine.
  • NASAM: Cythraul: I'd love to try a deep fried turkey some day. I hear they're de-e-licious. I'd only ever try frying one myself though if I had a large yard to lower the risk of burning anything down.

    They are delicious.

    You don't need a large yard, but you do need enough room that if the fryer starts to flame up, there is nothing around it to catch on fire. That means no garages, no decks, etc.


    Exactly. Everyone on my friend's block fries one so they just close down the street in front of his house (rural area and it's easy to go around so the cops don't care), and there's generally half a dozen fryers setup. It makes for a fun community Thanksgiving if the weather is nice actually.

    /and so delicious
  • We have a deep frying turkey party after thanksgiving at a friends house where people bring the ones they get free at the super market from buying food. Usually we do about 6 or 7 of them way out in the middle of his back yard. A good deal of people show up for this feast.

    /they are very tasty
  • NASAM: Frying a turkey is easy. You have to be a complete moron to start a fire doing it.

    I'm frying one and my brother is smoking one next week for Thanksgiving. Can't wait.


    I smoked mine in apple wood after an apple cider brining last year.
    I've been informed by the family that I'm not allowed to do it any other way from now on.
  • Cythraul: I'd love to try a deep fried turkey some day. I hear they're de-e-licious. I'd only ever try frying one myself though if I had a large yard to lower the risk of burning anything down.


    Its really the only way to cook a Turkey. But gallons of hot oil requires some sort of care which most people can't muster any time of the year let alone on Thanksgiving with people and alcohol flowing.

    /didn't realize frying a Turkey was some sort of "trend"
    //this year will be the first year in a decade I won't be doing it
  • I tried deep fried turkey years ago, when it was all the redneck rage. I didn't think it was all that and certainly not worth the effort or the risk.
  • NASAM: Frying a turkey is easy. You have to be a complete moron to start a fire doing it.

    I'm frying one and my brother is smoking one next week for Thanksgiving. Can't wait.


    Challenge accepted!

    http://youtu.be/KHrSXLuEx3U
  • NASAM: Cythraul: I'd love to try a deep fried turkey some day. I hear they're de-e-licious. I'd only ever try frying one myself though if I had a large yard to lower the risk of burning anything down.

    They are delicious.

    You don't need a large yard, but you do need enough room that if the fryer starts to flame up, there is nothing around it to catch on fire. That means no garages, no decks, etc.


    Yup. A few big things that people don't do that make frying turkeys dangerous:

    First off, defrost the turkey completely, and dry it as well as possible. Water makes oil pop and spray out, which can start fires.

    Secondly, put the turkey in the empty pot (not cooking yet), and then fill it with water, leaving the turkey totally covered with water but as far away from the edge of the pot as you can. Take the turkey out, and the remaining water level is how high you want to fill it with oil. After you get used to the sizes of a turkey and the oil you can skip this step, but your first time, you better make sure you do it. Most fires are caused by people putting too much oil in, and not understanding the principle of displacement.

    Then of course, make sure the pot is completely stable and level, lower the turkey in slowly (as well as removing it slowly and carefully), wear more than shorts and flip-flops, all the other things a normal, cautious person would do.

    It can be more work than just roasting a turkey, but damn is it good.
  • Displacement how does it work?

    Here is a top tip if you are unsure how much oil to use, check you displacement with water and your turkey before you have a pot of hot oil, oh and don't fry inside your garage or on a wood deck as has been mentioned.
  • gingerjet:

    /didn't realize frying a Turkey was some sort of "trend"
    //this year will be the first year in a decade I won't be doing it

    So you're a hipster who's moving on to an un-trendy thing? ;-)
  • That number is huge for such a sparely populated state. There must be like 0.42222222 fires in Wyoming.
  • Pffft....I beer brine and smoke my turkey like a true Texan.
  • Pitabred: NASAM: Cythraul: I'd love to try a deep fried turkey some day. I hear they're de-e-licious. I'd only ever try frying one myself though if I had a large yard to lower the risk of burning anything down.

    They are delicious.

    You don't need a large yard, but you do need enough room that if the fryer starts to flame up, there is nothing around it to catch on fire. That means no garages, no decks, etc.

    Yup. A few big things that people don't do that make frying turkeys dangerous:

    First off, defrost the turkey completely, and dry it as well as possible. Water makes oil pop and spray out, which can start fires.

    Secondly, put the turkey in the empty pot (not cooking yet), and then fill it with water, leaving the turkey totally covered with water but as far away from the edge of the pot as you can. Take the turkey out, and the remaining water level is how high you want to fill it with oil. After you get used to the sizes of a turkey and the oil you can skip this step, but your first time, you better make sure you do it. Most fires are caused by people putting too much oil in, and not understanding the principle of displacement.

    Then of course, make sure the pot is completely stable and level, lower the turkey in slowly (as well as removing it slowly and carefully), wear more than shorts and flip-flops, all the other things a normal, cautious person would do.

    It can be more work than just roasting a turkey, but damn is it good.


    Gotta dry it again after step 2, of course.
  • BarkingUnicorn: So you're a hipster who's moving on to an un-trendy thing? ;-)


    I'm a hipster who moved two thousand miles for a job and now lives in an apartment building - making it impractical. I was thinking of frying cornish hens this year. They will be all the rage in a year. :)
  • Usually I balance about ten gallons of oil in a big spaghetti pot on the Weber knock-off grill, which I bring into the kitchen. Once the charcoal is hot enough, and the oil has started to smoke, I drop the frozen turkey into the oil from about five feet up (a safe distance). Any excess oil gets absorbed by the burning charcoal, and any that spills over onto the floor gets washed away by the fire hoses. Last year the landlord let us stay in his garage until we found a new apartment.
  • arador: Pffft....I beer brine and smoke my turkey like a true Texan.


    I'd be interested in hearing about a beer brine. I'm a homebrewer and love using my smoker for meat prep.

    I smoked my first turkey this past weekend. We were supposed to host a Thanksgiving for friends and the event got canceled and we had a 18 pound bird that was going to go to waste.

    It was way bigger than I wanted to do but it came out okay. Not great, but okay.
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