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  • I never paid for beer in college. Some was bought with hall funds, but the hall tax was fixed. If it hadn't gone to beer it would have gone to fruit or something silly. Having beer didn't cost me. Drinking age was 21 so I couldn't have spent money on beer directly. Nobody cared about underage drinking, so hall parties had beer.
  • Since when is beer a hidden college expense?
  • DammitIForgotMyLogin: Since when is beer a hidden college expense?


    If you're living on a dry campus...
  • Thirteen hidden colleges expenses. Fourteen would have been beer, but no one wants to admit it

    This must be fancy college writin'.
  • Hidden colleges? Do they have Unseen Deans?
  • DammitIForgotMyLogin: Since when is beer a hidden college expense?


    Since when are books and lab fees a hidden college expense?
  • Hookers and blow strangely absent from the list.
  • Apparently college students aren't aware that books, supplies, parking, entertainment, fraternities/sororities, memberships, furnishings, electronics, cable TV, clothes, cell phones, food, beverages, and travel cost money. No wonder I always see banks setting up tables on the main campus drag every semester, suckering students into credit cards with insane penalties and fees attached. They're all idiots.
  • And don't forget about birth control and abortions!
    Derp, derp.
  • Hold on, you need books for these college courses? Shirley, theses books are free.
  • What a stupid farking article. I wish it were hidden.
  • As identified by the article:

    Books and media,
    Class and parking fees,
    Having fun,
    Fraternities and Sororities,
    Getting involved,
    Furnishings,
    Electronics,
    Cable TV,
    Wardrobe,
    Food and beverage costs, and
    Travel costs


    Drugs, bail and abortions suspiciously missing from the list.
  • tuition and fees accounts for only 38 percent of the total student expense budget for in-state students enrolled in public four-year institutions.

    In-state tuition is on the order of 5-6k$ for a 9-month semester. In an urban area, rent will run you easily 500-700$ a month, i.e. 4.5k$ to 6.3k$ for the non-summer period.

    Article proceeds on the assumption that the 200$-300$ yearly spent on parking and clubs are a significant hidden cost to someone that has to come up with 12k$ a year. Riiiiiiiiight.
  • Books and media: According to The College Board, the average annual cost of books for a college student ranges from $850-1000. This is one item you shouldn't skimp on. To save money, buy used textbooks (even cheaper used books can be found online vs. in the bookstore) or use library resources. If books cost more than you expected, revise the "textbook" budget for future semesters accordingly.



    What a bunch of bullshiat! Who the fark pays 1000 bucks in textbooks per year? The only way to approach that is if you bought new versions from the university bookstore, and had 4 science classes per semester that all had $150 textbooks. This is one item you SHOULD skimp on. Share with a friend, use the library, buy online, or half the time, don't even bother to buy a book, since they often aren't even really required
  • yeah, no one ever knew they had to buy books
  • Jim_Callahan: tuition and fees accounts for only 38 percent of the total student expense budget for in-state students enrolled in public four-year institutions.

    In-state tuition is on the order of 5-6k$ for a 9-month semester. In an urban area, rent will run you easily 500-700$ a month, i.e. 4.5k$ to 6.3k$ for the non-summer period.

    Article proceeds on the assumption that the 200$-300$ yearly spent on parking and clubs are a significant hidden cost to someone that has to come up with 12k$ a year. Riiiiiiiiight.


    That depends on the college. Many are in financial trouble, and they are finding new ways to make up revenue without raising tuition. I know of a couple of universities whose parking fees are approaching $1000/yr. That's not chump change to most people, I would guess.
  • There isn't one thing on that list that should be a surprise to anyone. If there is, well, perhaps college isn't for you. waste of time and $$, etc.
  • 14. Retaking classes.

    I teach at a university where students can retake classes as many times as they like to try to improve the grade. Many students take this as an invitation to blow off the class the 1st time around, see what grade they get, then decide whether to take it again.

    As a money making scheme it's brilliant: you get lazy students to pay twice. As a prof it's annoying because as soon as grades are posted you get a rash of students emailing to find out if the assignments will be the same next time the class is offered.
  • Apparently some folks don't know the difference between necessities and luxuries.
  • I know of a couple of universities whose parking fees are approaching $1000/yr.

    Surface lots around strip malls here in Toronto cost about $80/month/spot to build and maintain a paved lot. That includes land cost, snow clearing, repaving once a decade, etc. Charging less than $960/year in this city would be a subsidy to drivers, penalizing those who take other modes or live on campus.

    Multi-level parking garage costs are quite a bit higher due to the added capital for building the lot.
  • D3_WR: Books and media: According to The College Board, the average annual cost of books for a college student ranges from $850-1000. This is one item you shouldn't skimp on. To save money, buy used textbooks (even cheaper used books can be found online vs. in the bookstore) or use library resources. If books cost more than you expected, revise the "textbook" budget for future semesters accordingly.



    What a bunch of bullshiat! Who the fark pays 1000 bucks in textbooks per year? The only way to approach that is if you bought new versions from the university bookstore, and had 4 science classes per semester that all had $150 textbooks. This is one item you SHOULD skimp on. Share with a friend, use the library, buy online, or half the time, don't even bother to buy a book, since they often aren't even really required


    If you're going fulltime (4 classes per semester, 3 semesters a year), $1,000 won't begin to cover it. Especially when you have some courses that require lab and lecture (with at least one book for each lab, one for lecture). I had a geology class in which the books were $375 new, and the going rate for used (purchased from previous students) was $200. And most of the time, you do have to buy the book because the test material's from the book -- not from the lecture alone. Textbooks are a ripoff for students and a moneymaker for the school.

    As for the rest of those "hidden charges," most of that spending on fashion, fun and electronics was trendy "lifestyle" crap not necessary for the achievement of a degree.
  • I fail to see how any of these are "hidden". Most are expense of daily living. Some are unnecessary and easily avoided.
  • If those costs are "hidden" to you, you may not be college material.
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