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  • He deleted text messages from his own phone. I could understand this if he deleted them from the dead woman's phone.
  • Of course they would still be on the dead woman's phone. I would sue the ass off whoever pressed this charge.
  • I know that a journalism major is a fairly easy degree, but damn, this is a piss poor article.
  • PreMortem: Of course they would still be on the dead woman's phone. I would sue the ass off whoever pressed this charge.


    Knowing cops as I do .. I would say he's a person of interest or knows a person of interest and they want him nice and safe in a cell somewhere. I often deride cops because they're mostly a waste of space but when it comes to murder, and real crimes like it, I expect them to use some trickery to get information out of people.
  • PreMortem: Of course they would still be on the dead woman's phone. I would sue the ass off whoever pressed this charge.


    They would retain their asses and you would be out a lot of money.
  • Can he unfriend her? Or is that a felony?

    /welcome to crazy world
  • Walker: Can he unfriend her? Or is that a felony?

    /welcome to crazy world


    Yes, but he can't delete any of her Facebook game requests.
  • RedPhoenix122: Walker: Can he unfriend her? Or is that a felony?

    /welcome to crazy world

    Yes, but he can't delete any of her Facebook game requests.


    Farmville forever!

    /God, I hate getting game requests
  • Maybey he just had an icky feeling because he found out he had necro-texted.
  • Walker: Can he unfriend her? Or is that a felony?

    /welcome to crazy world


    it's only a misdemeanor

    104abc.d.123 (texting a dead relative)
    1234asf.dffb.145 (unfriending the deceased)
  • If he killed her or knew anyone that did, why would he be texting her? So he could be caught? Did he delete them off of her phone?

    WHAT THE FARK IS GOING ON! ?


    Does someone wanna tell me what is really going on here?
  • The Internets. A series of tubes or it is more?

    i184.photobucket.comView Full Size
  • wambu: He deleted text messages from his own phone. I could understand this if he deleted them from the dead woman's phone.


    PreMortem: Of course they would still be on the dead woman's phone. I would sue the ass off whoever pressed this charge.


    These.

    Unless he's trying to claim something like "those text messages were planted! See, they don't appear on MY phone" it's a load of crap. Cops would have had to get a subpoena to check his phone anyway, whereas the text messages on the dead woman's phone would be available to them as a standard part of the investigation in the first place. Hell, how did they even know he deleted the messages, unless A) they saw him do it, or B) they ALREADY saw the text messages on the woman's phone.

    The only way this charge is justified, aside from the above, is if there was some bizarre situation where the text message content was unrecoverable on the woman's phone. Even then, you'd have to prove he knew he was destroying evidence that the cops didn't already have.

    On a side note, if someone I knew died under horrible circumstances I might be inclined to delete the messages I set to her, simply because looking at your last conversation with a dead person can feel kind of morbid.
  • I regularly clear out all the old texts from my phone...
    How long does it take for a phone company to triangulate a cell phone signal?
  • yukichigai: wambu: He deleted text messages from his own phone. I could understand this if he deleted them from the dead woman's phone.

    PreMortem: Of course they would still be on the dead woman's phone. I would sue the ass off whoever pressed this charge.

    These.

    Unless he's trying to claim something like "those text messages were planted! See, they don't appear on MY phone" it's a load of crap. Cops would have had to get a subpoena to check his phone anyway, whereas the text messages on the dead woman's phone would be available to them as a standard part of the investigation in the first place. Hell, how did they even know he deleted the messages, unless A) they saw him do it, or B) they ALREADY saw the text messages on the woman's phone.

    The only way this charge is justified, aside from the above, is if there was some bizarre situation where the text message content was unrecoverable on the woman's phone. Even then, you'd have to prove he knew he was destroying evidence that the cops didn't already have.

    On a side note, if someone I knew died under horrible circumstances I might be inclined to delete the messages I set to her, simply because looking at your last conversation with a dead person can feel kind of morbid.


    If nothing else, they could easily get them from the phone company. Sounds like total bullshiat to me, they just want that guy in jail for a while, probably while they figure some other shiat out.
  • I'm curious as to why ANYONE should have an opinion here when we don't have all the facts, and article did not indicate that the person who did it was not a principle for the murder. Or at least a person of interest.

    For the negative postings here... if the victim was a family member, and this person was a person of interest, would you have such an issue with him being in his current situation? Deleting phone history as soon as you are aware the dead person is dead, is suspect.
  • CasperImproved: I'm curious as to why ANYONE should have an opinion here when we don't have all the facts, and article did not indicate that the person who did it was not a principle for the murder. Or at least a person of interest.

    For the negative postings here... if the victim was a family member, and this person was a person of interest, would you have such an issue with him being in his current situation? Deleting phone history as soon as you are aware the dead person is dead, is suspect.


    says the person named casper....
  • Now I wish the article said more. How do they know he deleted them only after finding out she was dead? Regardless, I agree with the folks saying that this is a bs charge while they're figuring out what to do next. And, man, I hope nobody I text dies. I'll be in big trouble.
  • InternetSecurityGuard: Maybey he just had an icky feeling because he found out he had necro-texted.


    necro-texting? that's hot.

    /never trust a woman with a pulse
  • CasperImproved: I'm curious as to why ANYONE should have an opinion here when we don't have all the facts, and article did not indicate that the person who did it was not a principle for the murder. Or at least a person of interest.

    For the negative postings here... if the victim was a family member, and this person was a person of interest, would you have such an issue with him being in his current situation? Deleting phone history as soon as you are aware the dead person is dead, is suspect.


    You don't need "all the facts" to engage in some logical thinking. There virtually no way wiping those texts actually hindered the police investigation, nor is there any reason to think he thought it would.
  • CasperImproved: I'm curious as to why ANYONE should have an opinion here when we don't have all the facts, and article did not indicate that the person who did it was not a principle for the murder. Or at least a person of interest.

    For the negative postings here... if the victim was a family member, and this person was a person of interest, would you have such an issue with him being in his current situation? Deleting phone history as soon as you are aware the dead person is dead, is suspect.


    If he sent her text messages, he clearly didn't know she was dead. Unless he was doing it as a red herring, in which case WHY WOULD HE DELETE THEM?

    Also at hand is the fact that a 5th Amendment case could be made out of this.
  • Did I mention we don't have all the facts? Casper the friendly ghost was also interested in justice...

    I am okay with the person of interest in a murder having the short term of his life scrutinized. If I had someone close to me die, I would be okay with close scrutiny by the investigators (even family members). I'd want the responsible party caught. My phone log history be damned.

    I'd want the truth even if it hurts.
  • yukichigai: There virtually no way wiping those texts actually hindered the police investigation, nor is there any reason to think he thought it would.


    Depending on the State, it can be considered as such. Police departments have to go through judicial warrants to get text messaging laws from cell phone carriers. In some states, they can go through a person's phone and get the information without a warrant, or even permission from that person.
  • CasperImproved: Did I mention we don't have all the facts? Casper the friendly ghost was also interested in justice...

    I am okay with the person of interest in a murder having the short term of his life scrutinized. If I had someone close to me die, I would be okay with close scrutiny by the investigators (even family members). I'd want the responsible party caught. My phone log history be damned.

    I'd want the truth even if it hurts.


    And I'd like to know that the police handling the investigation of the murder of someone I cared about will act fairly and justly, rather than locking someone up on a bullshiat charge that will never last in court. When they finally arrest someone for the murder I'd like to be confident they did it because the evidence said the person did it, not because they decided on a culprit and then made the evidence fit.

    Let me reiterate, again, THERE ARE NO BELIEVABLE CIRCUMSTANCES WHERE THIS OBSTRUCTION CHARGE IS JUSTIFIED. The few circumstances that have been suggested are ridiculously unlikely. If you could come up with something, sure, I'd buy your argument, but as it stands there's nothing that makes me think the charge is anything but an abuse of the legal system that makes the investigators look like power-tripping asshats.
  • BronyMedic: yukichigai: There virtually no way wiping those texts actually hindered the police investigation, nor is there any reason to think he thought it would.

    Depending on the State, it can be considered as such. Police departments have to go through judicial warrants to get text messaging laws from cell phone carriers. In some states, they can go through a person's phone and get the information without a warrant, or even permission from that person.


    Yessssss but then why would they not be able to get the texts from the WOMAN'S phone?
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