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  • What the bureau didn't have - and apparently still doesn't - is evidence of a crime.

    Not that I'm particularly down on Petraeus, but I understand his affair violated the UCMJ. There was some question about a security breach as well, which the FBI has to take seriously.
  • Thing: Damned near anything can be stated in such a way that it appears to violate the vague but all-encompassing UCMJ.

    Thing: Who the f*** is so slow they don't assume that the FBI can intercept anything - anything - that goes over the Internet both in history and in real time? The FBI can easily penetrate the military, however slightly.

    Thing: I'll bet you an internet Gen. Petraeus did not knowingly violate any laws and is guilty, if at all, of bad judgement in his personal life. So shut up unless he gets convicted of something, will ya.
  • The Director of the CIA is a civilian position. UCMJ does not apply.
  • [isbenghaziascandalyet.jpg]
  • It's awesome to see the state surveillance apparatus directed up its own ass, isn't it?
  • sammyk: The Director of the CIA is a civilian position. UCMJ does not apply.


    (a) The following persons are subject to this chapter:

    (1) Members of a regular component of the armed forces, including those awaiting discharge after expiration of their terms of enlistment; volunteers from the time of their muster or acceptance into the armed forces; inductees from the time of their actual induction into the armed forces; and other persons lawfully called or ordered into, or to duty in or for training in the armed forces, from the dates when they are required by the terms of the call or order to obey it.

    (2) Cadets, aviation cadets, and midshipman.

    (3) Members of a reserve component while on inactive-duty training, but in the case of members of the Army National Guard of the United States or the Air National Guard of the United States only when in Federal Service.

    (4) Retired members of a regular component of the armed forces who are entitled to pay.

    (5) Retired members of a reserve component who are receiving hospitalization from an armed force.

    (6) Members of the Fleet Reserve and Fleet Marine Corps Reserve.

    (7) Persons in custody of the armed forces serving a sentence imposed by a court-martial.

    (8) Members of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Public Health Service, and other organizations, when assigned to and serving with the armed forces.

    (9) Prisoners of war in custody of the armed forces.

    (10) In time of war, persons serving with or accompanying an armed force in the field.

    (11) Subject to any treaty or agreement which the United States is or may be a party to any accepted rule of international law, persons serving with, employed by, or accompanying the armed forces outside the United States and outside the Canal Zone, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands.

    (12) Subject to any treaty or agreement t which the United States is or may be a party to any accepted rule of international law, persons within an area leased by or otherwise reserved or acquired for use of the United States which is under the control of the Secretary concerned and which is outside the United States and outside the Canal Zone, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands.
  • Well, a Democrat is in the White House, so that means it's open season on Congressional Investigations of everything Executive. We'll be back into "Executive Power should not be subject to the whims of Congress" season as soon as we have another Republican president.
  • When you have to train entire departments of alleged civil servants to be autocratic, hypocritical, disingenuous and out and out clinical paranoia level sneaky, what do suppose you're going to end up with? Xanadu? Utopia? Try 1984. Every behavior, a possible indictment. Welcome to gossip fence America. Don't mind the stink.
  • frankmanhog: Well, a Democrat is in the White House, so that means it's open season on Congressional Investigations of everything Executive. We'll be back into "Executive Power should not be subject to the whims of Congress" season as soon as we have another Republican president.


    My prediction is that we won't have a two-term democrat with a republican house majority who is not impeached during his second term during my lifetime (1987- ).
  • frankmanhog: We'll be back into "Executive Power should not be subject to the whims of Congress" season as soon as we have another Republican president.


    Really, why's that?
  • incendi: (4) Retired members of a regular component of the armed forces who are entitled to pay.


    Can you cite a single case in the last 20 years of a retired officer on a pension being brought up on charges under the the UCMJ?
  • While I wouldn't want the guy as a brother-in-law, why exactly does infidelity make a man unfit to run the CIA? And I don't really buy the "classified material" line, unless someone can point to actual documents of value. Hell, the weather forecast is probably classified top-secret.

    I am all for law and order, and having good state security- but we have gone too far. The rules of search and protection from state-sponsored snooping have not caught up with the ability of gather and analyze electronic communications.

    I don't consider myself especially paranoid, but I suspect that most of my phone calls and emails are monitored somewhere along the line by some giant computer. I just hope we don't destroy our liberty and freedom in trying to protect our liberty and freedom.
  • So, essentially, the job of POTUS is to say who's allowed to talk sh* about whom while businesses actually tun the country?
  • incendi: sammyk: The Director of the CIA is a civilian position. UCMJ does not apply.

    (a) The following persons are subject to this chapter:

    (1) Members of a regular component of the armed forces, including those awaiting discharge after expiration of their terms of enlistment; volunteers from the time of their muster or acceptance into the armed forces; inductees from the time of their actual induction into the armed forces; and other persons lawfully called or ordered into, or to duty in or for training in the armed forces, from the dates when they are required by the terms of the call or order to obey it.

    (2) Cadets, aviation cadets, and midshipman.

    (3) Members of a reserve component while on inactive-duty training, but in the case of members of the Army National Guard of the United States or the Air National Guard of the United States only when in Federal Service.

    (4) Retired members of a regular component of the armed forces who are entitled to pay.

    (5) Retired members of a reserve component who are receiving hospitalization from an armed force.

    (6) Members of the Fleet Reserve and Fleet Marine Corps Reserve.

    (7) Persons in custody of the armed forces serving a sentence imposed by a court-martial.

    (8) Members of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Public Health Service, and other organizations, when assigned to and serving with the armed forces.

    (9) Prisoners of war in custody of the armed forces.

    (10) In time of war, persons serving with or accompanying an armed force in the field.

    (11) Subject to any treaty or agreement which the United States is or may be a party to any accepted rule of international law, persons serving with, employed by, or accompanying the armed forces outside the United States and outside the Canal Zone, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands.

    (12) Subject to any treaty or agreement t which the United States is or may be a party to any accepted rule of international law, persons within an area leased by or otherwise reserved or acquired for use of the United States which is under the control of the Secretary concerned and which is outside the United States and outside the Canal Zone, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands.


    He's not being paid by the military. CIA is not a military organization.

    That said, affairs like this can kill your security clearance.
  • That does it! Next international terrorist/criminal/kinky/tasteless scheme I run, it will be conducted using snail mail, sealed with wax, embossed by my signet.....

    /that, or quantum crypto
  • mark12A: That does it! Next international terrorist/criminal/kinky/tasteless scheme I run, it will be conducted using snail mail, sealed with wax, embossed by my signet.....

    /that, or quantum crypto


    Me, too. I man, if he business of humanity isn't an endless escalation of better bullets and better armor, what is?
  • XveryYpettyZ: Can you cite a single case in the last 20 years of a retired officer on a pension being brought up on charges under the the UCMJ?


    Just because they don't, doesn't mean they can't. 

    /It'd be a silly waste of resources to try and prosecute retirees for bullshiat all the time.
  • LazarusLong42: He's not being paid by the military. CIA is not a military organization.


    He's a military retiree.
  • mark12A: That does it! Next international terrorist/criminal/kinky/tasteless scheme I run, it will be conducted using snail mail, sealed with wax, embossed by my signet.....

    /that, or quantum crypto


    Or you could go for maximum privacy and publish the updates in Newsweek.
  • HotIgneous Intruder: It's awesome to see the state surveillance apparatus directed up its own ass, isn't it?


    This. They're probably actually wondering, "what group of post-9/11 pants wetting knuckleheads" gave them THIS kind of surveillance capability?

    Some federal prosecutors have sought to establish a "wall" whereby one set of agents conducts a first review of material, disclosing to the investigating agents only what is relevant.

    Blow me, Feds. You asked for indiscriminate, unaccountable surveillance, now deal with it.
  • incendi: XveryYpettyZ: Can you cite a single case in the last 20 years of a retired officer on a pension being brought up on charges under the the UCMJ?

    Just because they don't, doesn't mean they can't. 

    /It'd be a silly waste of resources to try and prosecute retirees for bullshiat all the time.


    The fact that they don't ever prosecute retirees, and won't in this case, is a pretty firm indicator that the UCMJ is completely irrelevant to the Patraeus issue.
  • ... yes, work e-mail servers generally keeping indexable backups is definitely evidence of a sinister FBI doom conspiracy and not industry standard for the last two decades for literally every industry in existence.
  • And she's scrambling around, trying to get her files back on, but it's too late. I've seen everything.
  • The Republic of gotcha smells of despair and boot leather.
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