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  • What they lacked in sheer numbers they more than made up for in lack of influence.
  • Walking off your shift is grounds for a firing, right?
  • Well, given that those associates are working at Walmart, they do have to consider how limited their options are once they're fired.
  • Arthur Jumbles: Walking off your shift is grounds for a firing, right?


    In a 'right to work' state, they can fire you whenever they want to for any reason they damn please (up to, and including, no reason at all).
  • kid_icarus: Arthur Jumbles: Walking off your shift is grounds for a firing, right?

    In a 'right to work' state, they can fire you whenever they want to for any reason they damn please (up to, and including, no reason at all).


    As opposed to a union job, where they can't fire you without you violating major rules or laws, several times usually.

    Most of the articles I've seen on this point out how horrifying it is that Wal-Mart employees often start at close to minimum wage, and receive pay raises of only 40 to 60 cents per year after that, with a cap around $15 or so.

    The union that covers this industry, for the most part, the UFCW, let me tell you about their contracts:

    Everyone starts at minimum wage. Pay raises are 5c a year for the first 4 years, then 10c a year for several more years. Maximum pay is typically around $12 or so, unless you have 20+ years in, then the maxes go up.

    At least, this was the agreement that the last grocery store I was in had. It was about as close to slave labor as you can get in this country without actually working at an Amazon warehouse.
  • kid_icarus: Arthur Jumbles: Walking off your shift is grounds for a firing, right?

    In a 'right to work' state, they can fire you whenever they want to for any reason they damn please (up to, and including, no reason at all).


    Please learn the difference between "at will" and "right to work" before posting.
  • kid_icarus: Arthur Jumbles: Walking off your shift is grounds for a firing, right?

    In a 'right to work' state, they can fire you whenever they want to for any reason they damn please (up to, and including, no reason at all).


    No. No they can't.

    There are specific reasons they CANT fire you. Religion, Sex, Age... But they can fire you because you're ugly and your mom dresses you funny. Especially if one of the reasons they WANT to fire you is one of the reasons they can't use... they will just right-size your department.
  • ekdikeo4: kid_icarus: Arthur Jumbles: Walking off your shift is grounds for a firing, right?

    In a 'right to work' state, they can fire you whenever they want to for any reason they damn please (up to, and including, no reason at all).

    As opposed to a union job, where they can't fire you without you violating major rules or laws, several times usually.

    Most of the articles I've seen on this point out how horrifying it is that Wal-Mart employees often start at close to minimum wage, and receive pay raises of only 40 to 60 cents per year after that, with a cap around $15 or so.

    The union that covers this industry, for the most part, the UFCW, let me tell you about their contracts:

    Everyone starts at minimum wage. Pay raises are 5c a year for the first 4 years, then 10c a year for several more years. Maximum pay is typically around $12 or so, unless you have 20+ years in, then the maxes go up.

    At least, this was the agreement that the last grocery store I was in had. It was about as close to slave labor as you can get in this country without actually working at an Amazon warehouse.


    And there are really either two ways to resolve the employee crisis:

    1). Force the employers to compete for the employee either using government regulation or consumer boycotts
    2). Allocate more power to the employee by either collectively supporting the unionization of Walmart or by endorsing lawsuits by employees for things like an employer not adequately compensating for services rendered.

    We, as a society, have to determine what values we want our society to reflect and then agree that even if it takes more effort on our part, it's worth making that transformation.
  • The point's been made. Walmart, as big and monolithic as it may be, doesn't like bad press. This could lead to second thoughts on management's part when dealing with employees. If they were to blatantly mistreat an employee now, it's more likely to have light shone on it.
  • To be fair, I'd rather be outside than in the hellish innards of a Black Friday sale.
  • Subby: The actual number of Walmart associates who participated in the Black Friday walkout? Less than 50

    The actual number of Walmart walkout participants who will now find themselves jobless? Probably identical.
  • olddeegee: The point's been made. Walmart, as big and monolithic as it may be, doesn't like bad press. This could lead to second thoughts on management's part when dealing with employees. If they were to blatantly mistreat an employee now, it's more likely to have light shone on it.


    Right. Because before this lame stunt - not a single article has ever been written on the labor practices of Walmart. Evar.
  • Well, that'll show 'em!
  • Josue Mata, a 28-year-old employee of a south Dallas store, ...raises four kids, pays child support and lives with his parents.

    Making smart choices in life is not one of his strong points.

    /Refused to go to any stores that ran 'Black Friday' sales on Thanksgiving.
  • Shame more people didn't take part. The only way to make a change is for most of the employees to make a stand, yet I doubt that's going to happen anytime soon.
  • ... according to Walmart.

    Maybe Walmart has an incentive to lie about the number of its workers who are on strike?
  • WizardofToast: To be fair, I'd rather be outside than in the hellish innards of a Black Friday sale.


    ^^^^^

    There are things I need to purchase, completely unrelated to christmas or any occasion. However, today, the whole Black Friday thing and the fact the windchill is about 22F, I'm good staying in and drinking early. I can go early tomorrow morning, be home in time to make snacks and restock the bar for tree trimming party later tomorrow afternoon.

    Yes, I'm fine with that.

    /still in her awesome leopard print flannel jammies, drinking a nice unfiltered wheat beer.
    //splurging on heat, have it turned up to 67, nice and toasty.
  • Raw_fishFood: Shame more people didn't take part. The only way to make a change is for most of the employees to make a stand, yet I doubt that's going to happen anytime soon.


    hard to take a stand when you really need the money. This is, of course, why the "free market" thing is complete hooey, but whatever...
  • UNION! UNION! UNION!

    The good for nothing phuqs. I bet the Walmart employees, with what little money they earn, don't feel like giving some of it to what appears to be clearly, ineffective union representation.
  • How much do the unions pay the people they have protesting? If I recall it's usually homeless people working for minimum wage or less.
  • Bontesla:

    We, as a society, have to determine what values we want our society to reflect and then agree that even if it takes more effort on our part, it's worth making that transformation.

    Haha, yeah.  If it requires more effort on the part of the general population, it isn't going to become a part of our society.
  • olddeegee: The point's been made. Walmart, as big and monolithic as it may be, doesn't like bad press. This could lead to second thoughts on management's part when dealing with employees. If they were to blatantly mistreat an employee now, it's more likely to have light shone on it.

  • I have an old acquaintance who has worked at Walmart for about 20 years I think. Ran into him the other day when I went there and after the pleasantries, I asked him about the protest. He told me that word had been passed around in an unofficial way that if anyone at that location walked off of a scheduled work day, they would more than likely lose their job soon after. Personally I don't give a shiat. If someone works there, they choose to work there knowing how that company is.
  • ekdikeo4: kid_icarus: Arthur Jumbles: Walking off your shift is grounds for a firing, right?

    In a 'right to work' state, they can fire you whenever they want to for any reason they damn please (up to, and including, no reason at all).

    As opposed to a union job, where they can't fire you without you violating major rules or laws, several times usually.

    Most of the articles I've seen on this point out how horrifying it is that Wal-Mart employees often start at close to minimum wage, and receive pay raises of only 40 to 60 cents per year after that, with a cap around $15 or so.

    The union that covers this industry, for the most part, the UFCW, let me tell you about their contracts:

    Everyone starts at minimum wage. Pay raises are 5c a year for the first 4 years, then 10c a year for several more years. Maximum pay is typically around $12 or so, unless you have 20+ years in, then the maxes go up.

    At least, this was the agreement that the last grocery store I was in had. It was about as close to slave labor as you can get in this country without actually working at an Amazon warehouse.


    I'm glad to live in a state (WA) where grocery workers aren't treated like total garbage because my company's union doesn't allow it. I'm maxed out at almost $20/hr with decent benefits in a stocking job. When the wife and I researched job opportunities in her home state of Florida, we found that in a similar job there you'd be lucky to make $10/hr.
  • iccky: ... according to Walmart.

    Maybe Walmart has an incentive to lie about the number of its workers who are on strike?


    Ya think? came here to say basically the same thing.
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