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  • Yeah, good luck with that.

    a.abcnews.comView Full Size
  • Yep, that's exactly what I thought too subby.

    Bangladesh has around 4,500 garment factories that make clothes for brands including Tesco, Wal-Mart, JC Penney, H&M, Marks & Spencer, Kohl's and Carrefour.

    Witnesses said the workers, mostly women, ran for safety as the fire engulfed the plant, but were unable to come out through narrow exits.

    "Many jumped out from the windows and were injured, or died on the spot," Milon, a resident, said


    It's only been 101 years since the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, but hey, in the interest of globalization let's toss out all of our safety laws our ancestors fought for and died for, and ship jobs overseas to where labor is cheap and costs are low because there are no safety laws, child labor laws, pollution control.

    Damn Americans, we just can't compete.

    101 years and we've learned nothing.
  • Americans don't give a shiat if people die outside of a 10 mile radius.

    9/11 included.
  • What really worries me is when Three Mile Island becomes a third-world franchise operation.
  • RoyBatty: It's only been 101 years since the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, but hey, in the interest of globalization let's toss out all of our safety laws our ancestors fought for and died for, and ship jobs overseas to where labor is cheap and costs are low because there are no safety laws, child labor laws, pollution control.

    Damn Americans, we just can't compete.

    101 years and we've learned nothing.


    Can I get an Amen, from the audience?
    Amen!
  • I hope the cost of the shirts burnt will be taken out of their final pay packets and not passed on to the western consumer
  • Please refrain from smoking.
  • DiscoDJ: RoyBatty: It's only been 101 years since the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, but hey, in the interest of globalization let's toss out all of our safety laws our ancestors fought for and died for, and ship jobs overseas to where labor is cheap and costs are low because there are no safety laws, child labor laws, pollution control.

    Damn Americans, we just can't compete.

    101 years and we've learned nothing.

    Can I get an Amen, from the audience? choir
    Amen!

  • In the big picture, 101 years really isn't that long ago. After seven or eight measly decades, the big business interests merely moved elsewhere to kill people for profit since they couldn't do it as easily over here anymore. It'll sadly take a lot longer for common people in third world places such as this to rise up and demand to live humane lives than it did here.

    Over here, the Right has managed to demonize labor unions and common people in general over the last 25 years, even convincing a large proportion that our downfall from an industrial society is the workers' faults. Don't be surprised if, over the next century, we'll see some of the things we take for granted rolled back so that big business interests can fark us over a little more easily. We're already there with 40-hour weeks being mostly a thing of the past for non-retail people.
  • I would love to see a catalog, by the way, of the exact garments made by this place. Out them, if they are destined for Wal-Mart!

    Maybe this one was made there?

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  • Ow My Balls: In the big picture, 101 years really isn't that long ago. After seven or eight measly decades, the big business interests merely moved elsewhere to kill people for profit since they couldn't do it as easily over here anymore. It'll sadly take a lot longer for common people in third world places such as this to rise up and demand to live humane lives than it did here.

    Over here, the Right has managed to demonize labor unions and common people in general over the last 25 years, even convincing a large proportion that our downfall from an industrial society is the workers' faults. Don't be surprised if, over the next century, we'll see some of the things we take for granted rolled back so that big business interests can fark us over a little more easily. We're already there with 40-hour weeks being mostly a thing of the past for non-retail people.


    Yep
  • RoyBatty: Yep, that's exactly what I thought too subby.

    Bangladesh has around 4,500 garment factories that make clothes for brands including Tesco, Wal-Mart, JC Penney, H&M, Marks & Spencer, Kohl's and Carrefour.

    Witnesses said the workers, mostly women, ran for safety as the fire engulfed the plant, but were unable to come out through narrow exits.

    "Many jumped out from the windows and were injured, or died on the spot," Milon, a resident, said

    It's only been 101 years since the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, but hey, in the interest of globalization let's toss out all of our safety laws our ancestors fought for and died for, and ship jobs overseas to where labor is cheap and costs are low because there are no safety laws, child labor laws, pollution control.

    Damn Americans, we just can't compete.

    101 years and we've learned nothing.


    I imagine their conditions are fairly similar to 101 years ago. Who is we? We learned something...get someone else to make our shiat.
  • Ow My Balls: I would love to see a catalog, by the way, of the exact garments made by this place. Out them, if they are destined for Wal-Mart!


    But if they are destined for designer stores, or retail outlets that employ union workers, then shush your mouth. Right?
  • RoyBatty: 101 years and we've learned nothing.


    101 years and American industrialists haven't changed.
  • edmo: RoyBatty: 101 years and we've learned nothing.

    101 years and American industrialists haven't changed.


    101 years and American Industrialists are still starting businesses expecting to make a profit...
  • RoyBatty: Yep, that's exactly what I thought too subby.

    Bangladesh has around 4,500 garment factories that make clothes for brands including Tesco, Wal-Mart, JC Penney, H&M, Marks & Spencer, Kohl's and Carrefour.

    Witnesses said the workers, mostly women, ran for safety as the fire engulfed the plant, but were unable to come out through narrow exits.

    "Many jumped out from the windows and were injured, or died on the spot," Milon, a resident, said

    It's only been 101 years since the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, but hey, in the interest of globalization let's toss out all of our safety laws our ancestors fought for and died for, and ship jobs overseas to where labor is cheap and costs are low because there are no safety laws, child labor laws, pollution control.

    Damn Americans, we just can't compete.

    101 years and we've learned nothing.


    once upon a time we had rules that didn't allow us to bring in goods from places that didn't have decent working wages and conditions. Americans had good jobs and there were far less imports.
    Then our politicians sold us out to the multinationals.
  • Ow My Balls: In the big picture, 101 years really isn't that long ago. After seven or eight measly decades, the big business interests merely moved elsewhere to kill people for profit since they couldn't do it as easily over here anymore. It'll sadly take a lot longer for common people in third world places such as this to rise up and demand to live humane lives than it did here.

    Over here, the Right has managed to demonize labor unions and common people in general over the last 25 years, even convincing a large proportion that our downfall from an industrial society is the workers' faults. Don't be surprised if, over the next century, we'll see some of the things we take for granted rolled back so that big business interests can fark us over a little more easily. We're already there with 40-hour weeks being mostly a thing of the past for non-retail people.


    Or the labor unions decided to overstep their purpose and demand ridiculous things from the companies, therefore driving them to find another alternative.
  • So let's all jump on the bandwagon of "Less regulation" and the new catch phrase, "We need to
    roll back regulations".. A certain pachyderm party had that a lot in their commercials.
    The "Job Creators" keep blaming those pesky regulations for cutting into job growth..Ya...
  • Hobodeluxe: RoyBatty: Yep, that's exactly what I thought too subby.

    Bangladesh has around 4,500 garment factories that make clothes for brands including Tesco, Wal-Mart, JC Penney, H&M, Marks & Spencer, Kohl's and Carrefour.

    Witnesses said the workers, mostly women, ran for safety as the fire engulfed the plant, but were unable to come out through narrow exits.

    "Many jumped out from the windows and were injured, or died on the spot," Milon, a resident, said

    It's only been 101 years since the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, but hey, in the interest of globalization let's toss out all of our safety laws our ancestors fought for and died for, and ship jobs overseas to where labor is cheap and costs are low because there are no safety laws, child labor laws, pollution control.

    Damn Americans, we just can't compete.

    101 years and we've learned nothing.

    once upon a time we had rules that didn't allow us to bring in goods from places that didn't have decent working wages and conditions. Americans had good jobs and there were far less imports.
    Then our politicians sold us out to the multinationals.


    Yes, the protective tariffs of the 1920s and 30s did so much for the working man.
  • We need two things...
    tarrifs on imports (free trade is a non-sequetur), and self-deportation (if "people who are here illegally" can't get jobs, they will go back).
    When my tax dollars no longer go to support a school system of 40% or more "people who are here illegally", then my tax dollars will go further. Like going to help African-Americans who got the short end, and are still getting it.
  • PreMortem: Americans don't give a shiat if people die outside of a 10 mile radius.

    9/11 included.


    if you put a little thought into your statement you'd realize people around the world maintain a small focused environment. some have no choice because they are not exposed to world events. those who have contact with readily updated media from multiple sources have to adopt a separation of self from the incessant flow of negative imagery and stories that flow. if they did not their humanity would suffer degradation, this would lead to depression and in time they would either become dysfunctional or suicidal. it's not Americans are cold and uncaring. it's that we live in a world where tragedy and suffering is a constant and to dwell upon same incessantly would have truly negative repercussions.

    American consumers are going to buy and wear out t shirts, jeans and sneakers day after day regardless of where they are manufactured, or by whom. it is a very few corporate heads that make the decision to manufacture or purchase goods made in third world countries by women and children working in unsafe conditions. these corporate heads sell their souls to make these decisions, enjoy a large annual salary for doing same, all in the attempt to secure a return of profit for investors.

    9/11 then, the foggy Texas highway deaths days ago. people can shed just so many tears. be thankful that you do have a thick skin protecting your senses else you'd have slit your wrists wide open long ago. a/k/a Lighten up, Francis.
  • DiscoDJ: We need two things...
    tarrifs on imports (free trade is a non-sequetur), and self-deportation (if "people who are here illegally" can't get jobs, they will go back).
    When my tax dollars no longer go to support a school system of 40% or more "people who are here illegally", then my tax dollars will go further. Like going to help African-Americans who got the short end, and are still getting it.


    Just out of curiosity, in your mind, what does 'non sequitur' mean?
  • It's not like they're people.
  • Nice Rasputina reference in the URL, subby.
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