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  • Phone book: that thing we used to have to look sh*t up in before the internet. Get rid of it.
  • I don't even know my friend's phone numbers anymore, it's been years since I've had to do anything but touch their name on the screen to call them.
  • millions of telephone number books distributed across America annually. bring in billions in advertisement revenue. responsible for employing thousands of tax payers. subby has never seen one.

    /867-5309
  • I don't get the hate for phone books, I can usually find something in it faster than whomever is ridiculing me for using it can get google loaded on their smart phone
  • In other news, The phone book has an "Animal Carcass Removal" section.
  • Oldiron_79: I don't get the hate for phone books, I can usually find something in it faster than whomever is ridiculing me for using it can get google loaded on their smart phone


    Same here. I don't have or want a smart phone. I can look something up in a phone book long before firefox even opens to search.
  • How is that not food?

    One guy I know stuck a deer in his freezer at his Messican restaurant....
  • invisbob: Oldiron_79: I don't get the hate for phone books, I can usually find something in it faster than whomever is ridiculing me for using it can get google loaded on their smart phone

    Same here. I don't have or want a smart phone. I can look something up in a phone book long before firefox even opens to search.


    So what happens when you need to look something up from a different state, or for a business that doesn't even have a physical presence like Amazon or eBay? I'm no smart-phone fanboi but, good god man. Enjoy your buggy whips.
  • abhorrent1: In other news, The phone book has an "Animal Carcass Removal" section.


    And apparently, that's considered the politically correct term. Roadkill removal is too offensive.
  • I showed my 9 year-old a phone book the other day. She had no idea what it was.

    A few months back, a rep from one of the companies came to sell me advertising in one. After he left, I asked the 80 year-old woman in the waiting area the last time she'd used one to look up a number. She said that she just used the internet.

    /Won't waste the money.
  • Phone books: front-porch-delivered fire starter material. I think it's a fantastic concept.

    /yes, that's what I use them for
  • Macular Degenerate: invisbob: Oldiron_79: I don't get the hate for phone books, I can usually find something in it faster than whomever is ridiculing me for using it can get google loaded on their smart phone

    Same here. I don't have or want a smart phone. I can look something up in a phone book long before firefox even opens to search.

    So what happens when you need to look something up from a different state, or for a business that doesn't even have a physical presence like Amazon or eBay? I'm no smart-phone fanboi but, good god man. Enjoy your buggy whips.


    Actually I do enjoy buggy whips, although for bedroom purposes rather than buggy purposes
  • my wife is a Realtor®™©
    guess what people new to the area ask her for?

    #1 on the list. go on, guess.
  • Eirik: /Won't waste the money.


    It just might get you on Jay Leno!
  • The phone book is for businesses that refuse to believe people use the Internet to look up their company before doing business with them. Hey business owner, hire a hipster to create a google+ or Facebook page for you. Then post your FULL contact info, and check back often.
  • In other news, what's a phone book?

    If you read beyond the opening of the article you will find the phrase "online directory" which should be sufficient for the learning-impaired snowflakes overpopulating the modern world.
  • Macular Degenerate: So what happens when you need to look something up from a different state, or for a business that doesn't even have a physical presence like Amazon or eBay? I'm no smart-phone fanboi but, good god man. Enjoy your buggy whips.


    I look those up on the internet, duh. Also some of us are not walking around with a smartphone glued to our person 24 hours a day, but we might find ourselves needing a phone number while we're not right next to a computer. For local stuff, I can also get a better feel for the business, and usually find it faster, using my FREE phonebook that gets thrown up against the door every year anyway.

    An internet search doesn't classify things as well, businesses are put into different groups on every different website you search, and you end up making phone calls to the business to find out exactly what it is that they do anyway after you find them on the internet--at least, that's what happened to me the last time I needed a certain business and I was out of town. Turned out that the "auto repairs" shops I was looking for were actually a farm equipment place, a muffler store, and a place that only did body work. A phone book usually has all that information right there in front of you.

    Carrying around a little lighted screen with you and using it constantly doesn't actually make you smarter than everyone else. That's just marketing.
  • A phone book is, by far, the best hyperlocal filter. Almost every business listed in the phone book has a local physical presence and is not faking it. Most also are enduring businesses that have persistence over time. These factors can be useful when you need a credible local specialty shop instead of some virtual vaporcorp that happens to be good at tweaking Google search algorithms.
  • Phone books don't leave bruises
  • Johnson: my wife is a Realtor®™©
    guess what people new to the area ask her for?

    #1 on the list. go on, guess.


    A bj?
  • Nakito: A phone book is, by far, the best hyperlocal filter. Almost every business listed in the phone book has a local physical presence and is not faking it. Most also are enduring businesses that have persistence over time. These factors can be useful when you need a credible local specialty shop instead of some virtual vaporcorp that happens to be good at tweaking Google search algorithms.

    THIS
  • I just recycled a few the other day when I realized they had never been looked at and were just wasting space. I'm sure the point is valid that they highlight the local businesses, but I would probably ask the long time residents for advice via Facebook and check Yelp! as well. Some local maps went out with the phone books.
  • These factors can be useful when you need a credible local specialty shop instead of some virtual vaporcorp that happens to be good at tweaking Google search algorithms.

    GPS coordinate to place name mapping often leads to place names I have never heard of. In that case I go to Google. If the first page of search results is primarily ads offering "meet singles in Northwest Farkistan" and "houses for sale in Northwest Farkistan" the place is a forgotten dot on a century-old USGS map. It was revived when somebody fed a list of every place name in America into a sales computer. So thanks to all those sales guys, you not only helped answer a question you also told me something about your web sites.

    Sometimes the places are real and in current use.  I overlooked them.
  • Johnson: my wife is a Realtor®™©
    guess what people new to the area ask her for?

    #1 on the list. go on, guess.


    A home in both their price range and a reasonable neighborhood?
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