Real News. Real Funny.

Comments

  • This week, Meyers said he declined to pay the fine because doing so would end his case, and therefore his ability to file an appeal based on what he alleges to be mistakes by Clervi.

    Isn't it game over once you plead guilty?
  • How else could he be a criminal judge?
  • Oblig....

    DO YOU KNOW WHO I AM?!?!?!?!?!?!?

    /out
  • Politician acts stupid....What else is new?
  • No man is above da law!!11!1
  • Well - an insanity plea is pretty much airtight with him being a Texan & all..
  • Marcus Aurelius: How else could he be a criminal judge?


    Not all criminal judges have warrants out for their arrest. Some of them have already been booked.
  • FTA: It is unlikely that police will track down and arrest Meyers because law enforcement seldom actively pursues warrants for traffic violations.

    Couldn't you, I don't know, arrest him once he shows up at work?
  • Isn't it game over once you plead guilty?

    He's saying the judge was mean to him so his guilty plea doesn't count. He spent years dragging out the case doing all the tricks "beat your ticket" guides say to do. The traffic court judge finally said the fine would be over $400 instead of the usual $200. The speeder judge said he felt pressured into paying and now he's going to take his case all the way to the supreme court (which he sits on, but he'll have to recuse himself).  So basically he's like any other whiny defendant. That's not to say he was doing anything wrong when he drove 79 mph on a highway, but he played the game and he lost. In the process he annoyed the judge.

    He's lucky. In Georgia annoying a traffic court judge can land you in jail. In Texas it earns you a bigger fine.
  • He's got a long way to go to beat Judge Drycleaner Pants.
  • Perhaps he thinks he is working at Mega-City Three...

    www.id-wall.comView Full Size
  • cgraves67: No man is above da law!!11!1



    netflix.hs.llnwd.netView Full Size


    The Magna Carta is just a damn piece of paper!
  • Couldn't you, I don't know, arrest him once he shows up at work?

    At work like in the garage, but not in his office. There's an ill-defined principle that one should not disrupt judicial proceedings by executing warrants. Not worth testing over an unpaid ticket.
  • ZAZ: Isn't it game over once you plead guilty?

    He's saying the judge was mean to him so his guilty plea doesn't count. He spent years dragging out the case doing all the tricks "beat your ticket" guides say to do. The traffic court judge finally said the fine would be over $400 instead of the usual $200. The speeder judge said he felt pressured into paying and now he's going to take his case all the way to the supreme court (which he sits on, but he'll have to recuse himself).  So basically he's like any other whiny defendant. That's not to say he was doing anything wrong when he drove 79 mph on a highway, but he played the game and he lost. In the process he annoyed the judge.

    He's lucky. In Georgia annoying a traffic court judge can land you in jail. In Texas it earns you a bigger fine.


    Ah. So he's a bigger asshole than I'd originally thought.
  • "If they can show I sped with no particular good reason, then I should be found guilty," he said. "That's what I've been prevented from showing - the reason I had to go a little bit over the speed limit at that particular place and time. If you are breaking the law and you have no acceptable defense to that, then surely that is not acceptable conduct. But that is not what I have right now."

    Is this judge saying that it's OK to break the law if you have a good reason?
  • FTA:"If they can show I sped with no particular good reason, then I should be found guilty," he said. "That's what I've been prevented from showing - the reason I had to go a little bit over the speed limit at that particular place and time. If you are breaking the law and you have no acceptable defense to that, then surely that is not acceptable conduct. But that is not what I have right now."

    So what's his defense? He's too important to obey the law?

    Meyers also has a second case pending in Austin Municipal Court for an unpaid fine after a city red light camera photographed his car running a stoplight at Interstate 35 and East 11th Street in January 2010. Records show Meyers hasn't paid a $75 fine and $25 late fee for the infraction, a civil matter for which defendants don't face arrest.

    Meyers said this week that he didn't remember receiving that ticket but promised to investigate and pay any fine he owes.


    Of course he will
  • They should just get that other moran judge down here to give a beating with his belt, like he did his daughter for downloading music.
    Honestly, my state embarrasses me.
    - driving like a grandma from now on.
  • He should be arrested for resisting arrest. Not turning yourself in the moment the warrant is issued is resisting isn't it? Of course it is. That'll be an extra $500 fine and we'll shoot your dog.
  • Is this judge saying that it's OK to break the law if you have a good reason?

    In Texas exceeding the speed limit is evidence of a crime but is not illegal per se. You can present evidence that you had a good reason or it wasn't unsafe under the circumstances.  You can even demand a jury trial.
  • ZAZ: Couldn't you, I don't know, arrest him once he shows up at work?

    At work like in the garage, but not in his office. There's an ill-defined principle that one should not disrupt judicial proceedings by executing warrants. Not worth testing over an unpaid ticket.


    I understand that, but I would think Judges should be held to a higher standard since they're the ones who sentence us to fines, community service, and/or prison if we've done bad things. I think judges should own up to their own crimes, especially if they plead guilty.
  • Any lawyer who comes before him should petition that he be removed from the case based on the fact that he's a wanted criminal.
  • guy's a hypocritic douche who deserves to be ripped from the bench, have all pensions cancelled, and have every case he's ever sat on reconsidered due to bias.
  • So...if he has a good reason for speeding, why has it taken him 4 years to get around to telling it to a judge? Oh, right, he's full of shiat and should either pay his fine or get thrown in jail for contempt of court.
  • Load 18 of 18 newer comments

This thread is closed to new comments.