Real News. Real Funny.

Comments

  • Anyone who thinks the US has a decent health-care system has never had to deal with a serious illness.
  • Just wait until you little shiats turn 50, you'll see what health care costs REALLY are.
  • "Gallup" has become a verb meaning "to completely destroy your own credibility"
  • I'm healthy and paying $300 a month for a high deductible plan - I can't say I'm thrilled. I'm definitely looking forward to the exchanges opening up to see if I can't get a better deal.
  • I have great health insurance, but if you have to take a prescription for anything - that's where they get you these days. I got a cold and a week of pills was $140 AFTER the insurance discount.

    Meanwhile, I had a hernia and the whole surgery to fix it, including pre- and post-op office visits, was $35.
  • Republican logic: I would rather $1,200 a month for me and my family than pay half that if the gubbermint is runnin it!

    /still not sure why we need insurance companies at all

    YOUR Government pays YOUR doctor. Simple
  • Lsherm: I have great health insurance, but if you have to take a prescription for anything - that's where they get you these days. I got a cold and a week of pills was $140 AFTER the insurance discount.


    Yeah, that's pretty expensive for what are for all practical purposes placebos.
  • t3knomanser: Anyone who thinks the US has a decent health-care system has never had to deal with a serious illness.


    Does spina bifida qualify?
  • They wouldn't be satisfied with their health care costs if they knew what people in Switzerland, Australia, Germany, Japan, France, or really any other developed country on the entire planet were paying for their health care. I guarantee it.
  • Hey Subby, does the NICU count? Just shy of $1M billed for a $150 copay. Worked for me and mine.
  • I have great coverage and a medical plan with a $3000 annual deductible. My employer kicks in $3000 a year into an HSA. I've said it before and I'll say it again: If you want good benefits, get a big boy job.
  • Serious Black: They wouldn't be satisfied with their health care costs if they knew what people in Switzerland, Australia, Germany, Japan, France, or really any other developed country on the entire planet were paying for their health care. I guarantee it.

  • It's like a long running Elephants turd.
  • My husband works in a NYC school. I am disabled. We are very happy with the cost of our healthcare. I have had seven operations and take twenty pills a day. If they change it, I will not be able to afford my meds, then what do I do. Should I wait in my bed to dye?
  • daffy: Should I wait in my bed to dye


    At least lay down some newspaper.
  • Honest Bender: I have great coverage and a medical plan with a $3000 annual deductible. My employer kicks in $3000 a year into an HSA. I've said it before and I'll say it again: If you want good benefits, get a big boy job.


    Because only the well-to-do deserve good healthcare.
  • Honest Bender: I have great coverage and a medical plan with a $3000 annual deductible. My employer kicks in $3000 a year into an HSA. I've said it before and I'll say it again: If you want good benefits, get a big boy job.


    In other words, about $3,000 of your salary is directed into an HSA instead on your behalf. Plus the employer portion of the premium.
  • Honest Bender: I have great coverage and a medical plan with a $3000 annual deductible. My employer kicks in $3000 a year into an HSA. I've said it before and I'll say it again: If you want good benefits, get a big boy job.


    Can women get those too or just Cool Bros?
  • Kind of like how you need a job while applying for other positions; once you're out of the loop, you may as well toke up/bottom up and watch it all burn.
  • Yeah, just don't go through a windshield while you're waiting for your coverage to kick in.
  • I went to my physical therapist yesterday for a persistent foot problem. She asked if I had seen a podiatrist as such a visit would be covered by insurance. I said "No, My deductible is $1250, so if it is not catastrophic it is out of pocket.". She laughed and said "Me too!" and went on to solve my problem.
  • The biggest problem roadblock to healthcare reform, or problem with attitudes towards healthcare, is that healthy people don't think rationally about health.

    There's a pretty large subconscious mindset of "well, I'm healthy, so things must be good and if something changes, my health could change." It's not just that people haven't had to deal with the healthcare industry, but that our brains are miswired a little when it comes to health and change.
  • Honest Bender: I have great coverage and a medical plan with a $3000 annual deductible. My employer kicks in $3000 a year into an HSA. I've said it before and I'll say it again: If you want good benefits, get a big boy job.


    The world needs service/food employees too... and taking one of those jobs shouldn't mean you get to die early because you wont get the drugs you need to stay alive. I understand where you're coming from, but we don't have to settle for a society in which the poor are left to die and vector diseases to everyone else... we should be better than that.
  • This is one of the weaknesses with healthcare reform. One of the issues that healthcare reform tries to address in the issue of the uninsured. 15% of Americans have no insurance. However, 85% have insurance and while these people may not love their insurance plans they are worried reform will make things worse for them. Known versus the unknown, they prefer the devil they know. Since 85% is more than 15% you get a majority of people who have reservations about healthcare reform.
  • Load 25 of 106 newer comments
  •  

This thread is closed to new comments.